12.E4 - Tools of Economic Policy in Global Economy

The Future of Water

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From ancient civilizations to current day metropolitan cities, all societies have been shaped by the struggle to control water. The future of humankind will be shaped by the element of water and this struggle for control will establish the balance between peace and war, profoundly influencing relations between countries and continents. Climate change will also greatly affect water resources in the future. In the next decades huge water projects will radically change the face of the Earth.

What's the Economy for, Anyway? (2009)

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Ecological economist Dave Batker presents a humorous, edgy, factual, timely and highly-visual monologue about the American economy today, challenging the ways we measure economic success - especially the Gross Domestic Product - and offering an answer to the question: What's the Economy For, Anyway?

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:40
What's the Economy for, Anyway?

International Trade: For Whose Benefit? (2012)

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The U.S. auto industry lost a lot of mileage in 1973 with the rise of the more efficient Japanese imports. In the 1970s, the "trigger/price mechanism" was developed in order to differentiate between fair and unfair trade practices.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:29
International Trade: For Whose Benefit?

Stabilization Policy: Are We Still In Control? (2012)

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Between 1982 and 1985, the Fed tightened the money supply to combat inflation, despite rising unemployment. Also in the 1980s, U.S. citizens began to feel the debilitating effects foreign trade would have on job loss. Paul Volker's monetary policy in the mid-1980s was designed to quell inflation once and for all.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:29
Stabilization Policy: Are We Still In Control?

Monetary Policy: How Well Does it Work? (2012)

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Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volker pushed us through two deep recessions using monetary policy and increased interest rates to combat inflation in the 1980s. His successor Alan Greenspan used a different tactic in the early 1990s and 2000s: flood the market with liquidity to prevent freezing.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:29
Monetary Policy: How Well Does it Work?

Global Economic Issues (2004)

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"Global Issues for Students" provides an in-depth analysis of current world problems. We have entered a new era of globalization - a level of interconnection unprecedented in world history.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:23
Global Economic Issues

GNP/GDP (2012)

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During the Great Depression, Simon Kuznets led an investigative study resulting in the first publication of the nation’s national income. It was called the Gross National Product (GNP). Using GNP to assess the overall production-to-consumption ratio of the U.S., President Roosevelt entered World War II without jeopardizing the basic needs of U.S. citizens.

Grade Level: 
High
Professional
Length: 
00:28
GNP/GDP

Globalization and Economics (2004)

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How have the forces of globalization shaped the modern world? This unit travels from the Soviet Union to Sri Lanka and Chile to study the role of technology and the impact of economic and political changes wrought by globalization. 

Grade Level: 
High
Professional
Length: 
00:28
Globalization and Economics

The Federal Reserve: Does Money Matter? (2012)

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The Federal Reserve was originally created in 1913 as an emergency lender to banks--a sort of bank of last resort. The Banking Act of 1935 and the Fed Accord of 1951 broadened the powers of the Fed, widening the range of options and tools it could use to manage the economy.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:28
The Federal Reserve: Does Money Matter?

Fiscal Policy: Can We Control the Economy? (2012)

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In 1954 relying on "automatic stabilizers," President Dwight Eisenhower withheld raising taxes in order to encourage consumer spending. In the 1960s, newly elected John F. Kennedy and economic advisor Walter Heller pushed Congress to approve a $12 billion tax cut stimulus.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
00:28
Fiscal Policy: Can We Control the Economy?

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