Computer Science

Factory Funner

Icon: 
game icon

In Factory Funner, players are factory managers who select and install machines in their factory. They try connect all machine input and output pipes to the right reservoirs or to other machines in order to build the most profitable configuration. A new machine brings revenue.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Content Area: 
Science
Computer Science
Play Time: 
40 min.
Factory Funner

ReadyFor Breakout Edu Kit

Icon: 
game icon

The Breakout EDU kit includes everything you need to play over 350 games created for the classroom environment. The kit includes access to the new BreakoutEdu Platform to be used while using the kit.

Grade Level: 
Primary
Elementary
Middle
High
Professional
Content Area: 
ELA
Math
Social Studies
Science
Fine Arts
LOTE
Computer Science
Special Education
Family/Consumer Science
Business/Technology
Library
Other
Play Time: 
30 min.
ReadyFor Breakout Edu Kit

Is Code the Most Important Language in the World? | Off Book

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The ability to code allows people to mold interactions between humans and computers. Coders have become the gatekeepers of how our culture uses technology. Because of this, many people now preach that everyone should learn how to code, saying that knowledge of programming languages is akin to reading and writing. But is it reasonable to assume that everyone will learn how to code?

NOVA Online | Surviving an Elevator Plunge

Icon: 
Streaming icon

What do you think would happen to you if you were in an elevator plummeting downward at 30 mph? NOVA Producer Joe Seamans helps you use your powers of reasoning to deduce the answer to this question in this video from NOVA Online.</p

CDC Racing to Stop Ebola

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Take an inside look at the fight against Ebola at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with this video and educational materials from PBS NewsHour from October 8, 2014.

Greening the Golf Course

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This UNC-TV segment demonstrates how the management of Pinehurst Golf Course #2, with the help of environmental engineers, made the course more sustainable. They used fewer chemicals, replaced the turf with native species, and cut water use in half.

Humanoid Robot Brains | MIT's Science Out Loud

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The smartest people in the world have spent millions on developing high-tech robots. But even though technology has come a long way, these humanoid robots are nowhere close to having the "brain" and motor control of a human. Why is that? Evan takes you behind the motor control processes in the human brain, and how cutting-edge research is trying to implement it in robots.

The Human Face of Big Data | Under the Data Microscope

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In the past, when we thought of things, those ideas became knowledge when we wrote them down. The current "big data" field couldn't be more different. There, data isn’t quite knowledge until researchers analyze it and shift it into interesting pieces of information - much like a microscope. However, researchers don't collect exo-bits and peda-bites of data. Instead, they look through that microscope to find what they could never see before using incredibly powerful algorithms.

Amateur Rocketeers Reach For The Stars

Icon: 
Streaming icon

For decades amateur rocket builders, or "rocketeers," have been aiming their rockets towards space. Now with advances in materials and technology, they're actually able to get there. QUEST travels to rocket launches in fallowed fields and barren deserts to learn more about this addictive hobby and to meet a group of passionate high school rocketeers who are about to launch their rocket into the stratosphere!

Building Wonders | Hydraulic Engineering in Ancient Petra

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how Nabataean engineers supplied the desert city of Petra with water more than 2,000 years ago, in this video from NOVA: Building Wonders: Petra. Archaeologists have discovered that underlying the city’s Great Temple is evidence of a citywide water system. However, the nearest spring that could have supplied the city with water is 5 miles away. After conducting a series of tests in the U.S. and taking measurements from Petra, a hydroengineer reveals the Nabataeans’ design solution that enabled them to transport water fast and without leaking from the spring to Petra: a ceramic pipeline with a precise slope of 4 degrees.

Pages