Computer Science

What Gemini Means to Gemini Elementary | Your Space Place

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Gemini has a lot of history to its name and makes sure to connect their STEM programs to the heritage. See how else they are involved with space exploration.

SciGirls | Baile Digital 02: Recoger y Crear (Collect and Create)

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The SciGirls work together to create all the assets they need to complete their dance program. The girls collect photographs, create costumes, and program the Spheros robots to accompany the choreography for the final dance presentation. 

Justin Garretson, Robotics Engineer

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Justin Garretson is a Robotics Engineer in Intelligent Systems Robotics & Cybernetics at Sandia National Laboratories. He answers the question, "Why did you become a scientist?"

Space Launch System and Computers | | Mission Control Clip

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At Johnson Space Center, Nujoud Merancy speaks with us about the Orion Capsule, then we head over to Stennis Space Center to learn about the RS-25 engine which will propel the SLS Rocket to space. And Lastly, we learn about the Core Stage of the Space Launch System and the computers.

Screen Time: How Much Is Too Much? | Above the Noise

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Even by conservative estimates, the average American spends over 6 hours per day staring at a screen. That’s a lot of time. What does the scientific research say about it? Is it good or bad for us? Co-produced with Common Sense Education. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Being a Woman at NASA | Moon Memories

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As one of the only female technicians for the Apollo 11, Elizabeth Muchow helped test the lunar module, but not without added challenges. Elizabeth Muchow shares how she didn’t have time to think of her gender while working on the lunar module for Apollo 11.

How Much is Too Much? | American Graduate

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“Our students are not widgets!” 

Certainly that is the sentiment of educators who see business involvement in schools as “putting in orders” for workers. Yet that refrain might be less common in an era when the whole notion of career and technical education is evolving way beyond shop class. 

Maybe that’s because each side understands its boundaries. Businesspeople and educators both say the same thing: Industry lays out the workforce needs; schools develop the curriculum. 

The video above, the final one in our opening series for American Graduate: Getting to Work, includes voices from a major regional employer as well as from K-12 and higher education.

"Getting to Work" at Holland 1916 | American Graduate

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Holland 1916 is a North Kansas City, Missouri manufacturing company with a history that dates back to the earliest years of the 20th century. But it has not shied away from a new approach to recruiting employees and preparing the workforce of tomorrow. 

The company regularly hosts fourth-graders at its Burlington Street headquarters to illustrate the real-world applications of math. 

“Business is the primary consumer of what educators are producing — students,” CEO Mike Stradinger said. “So we need to be involved in the process, and we have for too long been silent.” 

That epiphany came at Holland 1916, Stradinger said, when the company experienced problems with the quantity and quality of available workers. 

“Manufacturing, like most businesses, is a people game,” Stradinger said, “and if we don’t have great people, we are not going to be a great company.” 

Holland 1916’s initial education foray came about five years ago with high school students. But after feedback from teachers, the company decided to catch kids as early as possible. They landed on fourth-graders because that is when they learn division. 

But partnering with education is not without its difficulties, Stradinger said, and that’s mainly because business operates at a very different pace. 

“Our customers are constantly giving us feedback: we want it faster, we want it to do this, we want it to be less expensive,” Stradinger said. 

But to educators, even annual changes can feel disruptive. “And trying to get those two to work together,” he said. “You have to overcome that challenge.”

 

Nick Stergiou: UNO Professor and Creator of UNO’s Department of Biomechanics | What If – Innovator Insights

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NOTE: Spanish version is captions only.

Nick Stergiou leads the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s biomechanics program. They conduct a wide range of human movement research. He has degrees in exercise science and biomechanics.

Innovation Insights features short video interviews with innovators and creators answering questions about things like influences, passions, and mistakes, and offering advice for the next generation of innovators.

Inventions: Need a Light? Try Science. | Science Trek

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Inventors use the Scientific Method to answer questions, solve problems and invent things. Learn what the Scientific Method is and how Edison used it to invent the light bulb.

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