ELA

Rumpelstiltskin for Parents: Guided Viewing | Understanding Fairy Tales Old and New

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The Miller's Daughter and star of the show sits down and takes you behind the scenes of the learning concepts embedded in this modern retelling of the fairy tale Rumpelstiltskin. This video is designed for parents to watch without their children to learn valuable co-viewing tips and tricks such as discussion questions, pausing points, and questions to ask children during and after the fairy tale video.

Designed to meet Grade 4 English Language Arts Standards: Reading Literature: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).

1850-1874 Era | Lesson 8: Notable Nebraskan - J. Sterling Morton

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Today, J. Sterling Morton is best known as the co-founder of Arbor Day. Living in Nebraska City, Morton carefully watched the growth of the Nebraska Territory through all its ups and downs. He did not believe Nebraska was a Great American Desert, but quite the opposite. He believed in Nebraska's agriculture, and the honorable work of farmers. It was estimated that more than one million trees were planted in Nebraska on the first Arbor Day.

Learn more at NebraskaStudies.org.

Pre-1500 Era | Lesson 1: A Sense of Geologic Time

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Scientists divide geologic time into eras, measured in millions of years. Within each named era are periods, and within each period are epochs. Each vast unit of time is defined by the appearance and disappearance of various life forms and climactic conditions on Earth's ever-changing face. Geologists, paleontologists, archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians read the book of time in Nebraska's land. Their shared insights and interpretations can paint a detailed picture of life ten thousand years.

Learn more at NebraskaStudies.org.

City of Gold: The Story of South Pass City | Political Pioneers

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Learn about the key role South Pass City played in helping Wyoming become the first territory or state to allow women the right to vote and hold public office.

In the accompanying lesson plan (found in the Support Materials), students will watch a video that introduces South Pass City citizens and explains how they helped the women’s suffrage movement advance in Wyoming territory. They will discuss the main ideas presented in the video, and then work collaboratively to create and perform a short theater piece. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 

  • Students will develop grade level appropriate speaking and listening skills, as described by the standards.
  • Students will learn how South Pass City created a small change that would lead to major changes for the country by allowing women the right to vote. 
  • Students will apply collaborative skills to create a dramatic piece. 

Doctor Atomic | The Metropolitan Opera

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On July 16, 1945, an atomic bomb was tested for the first time in the deserts of New Mexico; within a few short weeks, the entire world would have to confront what this monstrous invention meant for humanity. Yet in Doctor Atomic, composer John Adams takes the audience back to the days immediately before the bomb’s first test to explore a more intimate side of this momentous event. The opera’s music is an excellent example of Adams’s signature “minimalist” style, while the libretto spotlights the complex feelings and conflicted loyalties of the Manhattan Project physicists—a small group of people tasked with developing the most destructive weapon the world had ever seen.

Watch John Adams’s opera Doctor Atomic, get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Met’s production, and use the accompanying Educator Guide to explore a defining moment of the twentieth century through the work of one of America’s greatest living composers.

Madama Butterfly | The Metropolitan Opera

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One of the most beloved operas ever written, Madama Butterfly is the story of Cio-Cio-San, a young Japanese geisha who gives up everything to marry the American lieutenant Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton. Yet when Pinkerton must leave Cio-Cio-San to return to America, the young lovers’ conflicting conceptions of fidelity and commitment become all too clear, and Cio-Cio-San finds herself facing an impossible choice. In the Met’s production, acclaimed film director Anthony Minghella draws on both Western and Japanese theatrical traditions to bring Cio-Cio-San’s story to life, while Puccini’s expansive music gives Cio-Cio-San’s vulnerability and courage a voice.

Watch Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Met’s production, and use the accompanying Educator Guide to explore artistic representations of Japan around the turn of the twentieth century.

La Fanciulla del West | The Metropolitan Opera

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Set in a frontier mining town during the California Gold Rush, Giacomo Puccini’s La Fanciulla del West is an operatic “spaghetti Western” that revels in all the hallmarks of the genre. Populated by ruthless bandits, tough-talking but goodhearted miners, a cynical sheriff, and one remarkable female tavern-keeper, Puccini’s Wild West is every bit as exciting as the world inhabited by John Wayne or Clint Eastwood. Yet this rough-and-tumble context also allows Puccini (and his audience) to explore universal questions about justice, forgiveness, and love.

Watch Puccini’s La Fanciulla del West, get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Met’s production, and use the accompanying Educators Guide to explore both Puccini’s great opera and real-life stories of women in the American West.

The Quilts of Ken Burns in 360° | Nebraska Stories

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Renowned filmmaker Ken Burns has collected quilts since the early 1970’s. In this 360 video from Nebraska Stories, take a virtual tour of an exhibit featuring his unique collection of quilts at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Deepfakes: Can You Spot a Phony Video? | Above the Noise

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Recently, a doctored video of Speaker Nancy Pelosi got millions of views on social media. Deepfakes are becoming easier to make and spread, and Above the Noise is here to help people understand this new phenomenon and what to do about it. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

 

 

Racist, Coded Language and the “Politics of Distraction” in U.S. History | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the video, and answer the discussion questions below. You may want to read along with the transcript.

Summary: President Donald Trump’s attacks on women of color in the U.S. House of Representatives have launched fierce debate about whether his meaning was racist. There is no doubt, though, that his words echo threats and insults that have been lobbed against perceived outsiders in America for generations, although there is little modern precedent for such language coming from a sitting U.S. president. To explore the painful history, NewsHour’s William Brangham talks to the University of Minnesota’s Erika Lee and UC-Berkeley’s Ian Haney Lopez.

“We have a political leader who, for his own benefit and for the benefit of his party, sees himself as leading the country further into division and hatred and violence,” Lopez stated, adding that, “At the very moment that this is so treacherous, it’s also an opportunity, because President Trump is making clear, through his actions, a dynamic that has actually plagued our country for the last 50 years since the civil rights movement.” Trump denies his tweets to the Congresswomen, which involved him saying they should “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came,” were racist. All four lawmakers are American citizens; three were born in the U.S.

July 18, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

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