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What Do El Paso, Dayton Gun Massacres Say about America? | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion questions below. You may want to read along with the transcript. For the sake of time, stop video #2 at 5m:30s.

Teachers’ note: For guidance on how to talk with students about mass shootings, you may want to read SAMHSA’s “Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event: A Guide for Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers.”

Summary: Terror and tragedy grip America with two deadly mass shootings in less than 24 hours. In downtown Dayton, Ohio, a gunman killed nine people, including his own sister, at approximately 1-am Sunday, August 4. Police said the carnage lasted less than a minute before they arrived on the scene and killed the shooter. On Saturday, just 13 hours earlier in El Paso, Texas, a mass shooting in a Walmart left 20 people dead and wounded at least 26 others. Investigators are treating the massacre as a case of domestic terrorism and will file capital murder charges against the suspect, now in custody. They are also trying to determine if an anti-immigrant “manifesto” posted online was penned by the alleged 21-year-old white male shooter.

August 5, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Mueller Makes Statement to Say Report Doesn’t Clear Trump | PBS NewsHour

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Summary: Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the Mueller report says there is insufficient evidence that President Donald Trump or his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 election. In response, the White House claimed victory, while Democrats insist the full report be made public. After weeks, a redacted version was made public here. For weeks, the only document that had been released to the public was Barr’s four-page synthesis of Mueller’s report. Trump sent out a list of Democrats who claimed there was evidence that he colluded with Russia, insisting they be held accountable. Meanwhile, Democrats point out that although Trump wasn’t charged with obstruction, he also wasn’t exonerated. To learn more what American voters think about the Mueller report, read this article by the Associated Press.

on May 30, Special counsel Robert Mueller broke his silence about his office’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. In a nine-minute statement, he reiterated that Justice Department policy prohibits charging a sitting president with a crime, and that his report did not clear President Trump of committing a crime. Judy Woodruff reports.

May 30, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

How Studying the Ocean Floor Explains the History of Earth’s Climate | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion questions below. You may want to read along with the transcript here.

Summary: To understand the history of climate change, researchers are digging underneath the ocean floor where organisms and plants have accumulated in sediment over millennia. Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory holds samples taken from the Earth’s ocean floor, a collection that has taken over half a century to build. One of the great scientific advances that came out of the Lamont core repository was the proof of the theory of the ice ages and this understanding that the ice ages come and go caused by variations in the Earth’s orbit around the sun.

“So right now, the Earth’s orbit should be making the Earth cooler in the Northern Hemisphere,” according to Maureen Raymo, a marine biologist and director of the core repository, “And we’re observing it’s warmer, and that’s obviously because we’re putting so much greenhouse gases into the atmosphere very quickly.” The repository collects samples from oceans all around the world and sends them to scientists to study. There are still many places to explore and many uncertainties about what happened in the past especially around Antarctica.

April 8, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Students' Take on the College Admissions Scandal | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion questions below. You may want to turn on the “CC” (closed-captions) function and read along with the transcript here.

Summary: On March 12th, federal prosecutors charged 50 people, including CEOs and celebrities, for securing college admission for their children through elaborate cheating plots and bribery. Since the scandal broke, widespread controversy and outrage has bubbled to the surface from families who feel cheated. High school students from around the country share their thoughts on the scandal and the inequities within higher education. “It’s easier to get into college if you’re rich. I feel like that’s just a given. Like, everyone knows that,” said high school student Eleanor Wirtz.

Jane Fonash, a school counselor for 24 years with Loudoun County Public Schools in Virginia and now independent college consultant, also weighed in on the scandal. She emphasized the need for college counseling services in public schools across the country to help student and families navigate the process.

April 16, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Responding to Growing Domestic Terrorism Amid California Synagogue Shooting | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion questions below. You may want to read along with the transcript here. If time is of the essence, you may wish to stop the video at 2m:18s.

Teachers’ note: Use this link to see a full list of resources on how to speak with children about gun violence, including in the immediate aftermath of a mass shooting. Resources are from a variety of organizations and for students of all ages. Use the resources that work best for you.

Summary: On April 27th, a gunman stormed the Chabad of Poway synagogue in Poway, Calif., in a San Diego suburb, where 100 worshipers were gathered. One woman, 60-year-old Lori Gilbert-Kaye, was killed, and three people were injured. One congregant was able to charge the gunman and force him out of the synagogue. The 19-year-old alleged shooter was inspired by white supremacy and posted an anti-Semitic manifesto on the internet hours before the shooting. The attack took place at the end of Passover, which is meant to be a celebratory time for Jews. Offerings of support have been flooding in for all of those affected, as the government grapples with how to stop the increase in anti-Semitic violence.

May 2, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Tales of The Natural State: Of Truth and Belief

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Arkansas is a unique place. The Natural State is a melting pot of sharecropper storytelling, myths of the Wild West and tall tales from deep in the hollers of the Ozarks. These forces have created a catalog of uniquely Arkansan folklore, which has been handed down for generations, shaping the way we see our state and the lands just outside our borders. Tales of the Natural State takes a creative look at some of the more powerful stories, to find out just what a tale needs to have a lasting impact.

Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury

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Every year, as many as 3.8 million brain injuries occur in athletics, and they are more common among children and students than star athletes. We often hear about concussions in professional football, but they can be a problem in any sport and at any age. To ensure the lifelong wellness of active youth, it’s essential to better understand the brain and the process of safely navigating brain injuries. 

This media gallery features segments from the award-winning AETN documentary Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury. Through eye-opening interviews with former professional players, medical experts, and renowned researchers, we explore the short-term effects and long-term risks of concussions, how to handle them when they occur, and the best methods of preventing them.

In 2017, Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury received an Emmy for Best Director and Post Production from the National Academy of TV Arts & Sciences, a Silver Telly Award for Best General Documentary, and a Bronze Telly Award for General Education.

For further information, please visit AETN's Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury webpage.

False Equivalence: Why It's so Dangerous | Above the Noise

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Not every topic warrants a “both sides” approach. Some viewpoints are simply not backed by empirical evidence or are based on false ideas. Journalists and anyone who work with facts have to be careful not to present them as legit debates. If they do, they are creating a “false equivalence.” False equivalence: what does it mean, and why is it helping to spread misinformation online? 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

 

 

The Address | In the Classroom

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The Gettysburg Address is known as one of the greatest speeches in American History. The compilation lesson gives you the tools to teach this incredibly powerful speech in your own classroom. Utilizing video from Ken Burn's seminal documentary Civil War as well as the 90 minute documentary The Address, this gallery has the tools to demonstrate the speech to your classroom and engage your students with some of the most famous words from one of the nation's most respected leaders.

The Giver by Lois Lowry | The Great American Read

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The Giver is a Newberry Award-winning book by Lois Lowry that tells the story of 12-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly perfect society called “the community,” where memories and feelings have been eliminated. He eventually discovers the community’s dark side and takes a daring step to save a life and seek freedom. We explore how Jonas is an ordinary boy who does the extraordinary.

Learning objectives
Students will:
 

  • Watch a video segment and answer contextual questions 
  • Build vocabulary, reading and listening comprehension skills
  • Complete a vocabulary worksheet 

 

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