ELA

And Then There Were None | The Great American Read

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Writers Gillian Flynn and Christopher Bollen explain why And Then There Were None is Agatha Christie's most compelling mystery. It's an example of how thrillers are so effective when talking about villains and monsters. Christie's masterpiece doesn't rely on a detective to solve the crime, and explores an obsession with both murder and justice.

Learning objectives

Students will:

  • Watch a video segment and answer contextual questions
  • Expand vocabulary and reading comprehension using a list of words introduced in the segment

 

Dune | The Great American Read

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Frank Herbert’s Dune, published in 1965, stands as a pillar of science fiction. It was one of the first in the genre to tell a relatable hero's journey. It is also known as a political power saga, a religious allegory, and a story about conserving natural resources. Actor Wil Wheaton shares his passion for the novel, and we meet Tom Duke, a fan of the book who moved his family to Taos, NM to live a life inspired by the desert planet Arrakis featured in the novel.

Family and Individual Identity | The Great American Read

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Family is one of the first places where we're assigned a role. We come to know ourselves early on through our relationship to the people in our family. The circumstances within which our family exists further shapes our experience. We look at this through Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, Markus Zusak's The Book Thief, and Betty Smith's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

Launch | The Great American Read

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Host Meredith Vieira introduces the Great American Read and explains how readers will vote for and crown America’s favorite novel.

Beyond the Front Page 2.0: The Art of the Interview

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Learn interviewing tips and tricks used by professional journalists in news gathering. This video features interviews with professional journalists across a range of media, and deals with a variety of topics ranging from proper etiquette to formulating effective questions.

Minding the Gap | Lesson Plan Clips

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Minding the Gap is a coming of age film by Bing Liu. Starting in high school, Bing begins to make skate videos. What starts as a hobby ends up as a profound exploration of issues that is likely to resonate deeply with students.

The diverse group of participants in the film — Bing, Keire, Zack, and Nina — see and feel the often jarring challenges of life in a small, declining Rust Belt city. Collectively, they experience family violence, substance abuse, economic insecurity, racism, and teen pregnancy, along with the typical struggles of identity formation as teens become adults. To cope, they skate — regulating the speed at which they move through life, attacking obstacles and flipping over platforms, sometimes unsuccessfully. The risks they take are sometimes rewarded and sometimes the source of pain. But they persevere.

6th Grade Explicit Comprehension Lesson: Informational Text Structure: Sequence

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Discover how a 6th grade teacher helps her students build comprehension skills by learning to identify sequential structure in science text.

Jamal Khashoggi’s Legacy and Freedom of the Press | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary with your students, watch the video (if helpful, follow along with the transcript) and then answer the discussion questions.

Summary: On October 2, 2018, Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi Arabian journalist and permanent resident of the United States, visited the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, to pick up documents for his upcoming wedding. While inside, Khashoggi was brutally murdered by Saudi agents, according to Turkish officials. Khashoggi had moved to the U.S. in 2017, and worked for the Washington Post. He was a well-known critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s (MBS) harsh treatment of journalists and the regime’s role in Yemen’s civil war. For several days, President Donald Trump urged the public not to pass judgment on Saudi Arabia, a long-time ally of the U.S., until the facts were known. Trump’s reaction led to criticism from abroad and inside the U.S., since America has long been viewed as a key protector of human rights and freedom of the press. On Oct. 20, Saudi state television confirmed Khashoggi’s death and announced 18 Saudi officials had been detained in connection with the incident. Saudi’s MBS denies he ordered or knew anything about the killing.

October 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

How Media Literacy Helps Teachers and Students Talk about Gun Violence | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the video (be sure to preview) and then answer the discussion questions. All of this week’s discussion questions have been based around media literacy! Your students may find it helpful to follow along using the transcript. For more information, read NewsHour’s What we know about the California mass shooting

Note: If you are a teacher, parent or concerned adult, you may want to use NewsHour’s resource, How to talk with children in the immediate aftermath of a mass shooting, with information from a variety of organizations and for students of all ages. Use the resource that works best for you and keep in mind this idea by PBS’ Lydia Breisith who writes, “Remember that it is ok to admit that you don’t have all of the answers. Mr. Rogers offers the following: ‘If the answer is ‘I don’t know,’ then the simplest reply might be something like, ‘I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.'”

Summary: On Wednesday November 7, at least 12 people including a sheriff’s deputy were killed in a mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. The shooter, 28-year-old Ian David Long, a Marine Corps veteran, is also dead. California’s Democratic lieutenant governor, Gavin Newsom, was elected governor just this week. “This can’t be normalized. This is just remarkable, just another day in America, but, tragically, now, in our state,” Newsom said.

November 9, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

 

Pulitzer and the Roots of Modern Journalism | Joseph Pulitzer: Voice of the People

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The 19th century was the world of print, and the master of that world was Joseph Pulitzer. Discover how Joseph Pulitzer transformed the newspaper industry in this video from the American Masters film Joseph Pulitzer: Voice of the People. Learn how Pulitzer reshaped journalism, from the visual presentation to the stories covered, and used his newspaper to fight for the interests of everyday people. Support materials include discussion questions and teaching tips which ask students to evaluate Pulitzer’s journalism strategy, and learn to become effective journalists themselves.

American Masters – Joseph Pulitzer: Voice of the People explores the remarkable man behind the prestigious prizes. A Jewish immigrant from Hungary, Joseph Pulitzer began as a gifted journalist before becoming a successful publisher and businessman. Pulitzer was famous in his own time for his outspoken and cantankerous editorial voice and his newspapers’ striking illustrations, visual style, national circulation, and financial success. Against the context of America’s explosive growth as a world force during the Gilded Age, Pulitzer emerges as the country’s first media titan, reshaping the newspaper to bear witness to and even propel that transformation. Joseph Pulitzer tirelessly championed what he regarded as the sacred role of the free press in a democracy.

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