Fine Arts

Walking in Burano

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Burano is a beautiful island of Venice in Italy, known for its colorful houses. Walking through the island, you will see these vibrant houses on both sides of the canal, as well as the personal décor placed by the inhabitants of these houses and shops.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Content Area: 
Fine Arts
Other
Play Time: 
40 min.
Walking in Burano

Thomas Dambo: Forest Giants | Muse Moments

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Thomas Dambo of Denmark created Forest Giants in a Giant Forest using “trash”—wood from old whiskey barrels, old pallets, and trees downed in ice storms. “I try to be a trash superstar,” he says.  

Cloud Art | PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC®

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Art uses science, math, and imagination, as Pinkalicious and her brother Peter discover in this video excerpt from the PBS KIDS series PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC®. When Mom invents a machine that transforms drawings into clouds, they are all eager to try it out. Peter learns about shapes as he draws a flower out of circles and ovals. Pinkalicious decides to make her favorite animal, a unicorn. The results are magical!

For use in the classroom, see Best Pink Present Lesson Plan.

Find out more about PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC® on the series website.

Frank King - Kissimmee | Central Florida Roadtrip

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Many of us who enjoy reading the Sunday comics are very familiar with “Gasoline Alley.” First published in 1918, it is the 2nd longest-running comic strip in the U.S. “Gasoline Alley” was the creation of Frank King, who for some 20 years called Kissimmee home.

Jazz: The History of Brass Bands in Mobile, Alabama

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Watch a video slide presentation on the history of Brass Bands in Mobile, Alabama. The bands discussed include the Excelsior Brass Band 1883, Pearson's Brass Band, and Griffith's Hypnotic Band. Topics discussed include the Turkish influence, performances at parades, community events, funerals, school openings and closings, and the function of the drum major. This presentation was filmed at the Alabama Department of Archives and History as part of the ArchiTreats lecture series.

Doctor Atomic | The Metropolitan Opera

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On July 16, 1945, an atomic bomb was tested for the first time in the deserts of New Mexico; within a few short weeks, the entire world would have to confront what this monstrous invention meant for humanity. Yet in Doctor Atomic, composer John Adams takes the audience back to the days immediately before the bomb’s first test to explore a more intimate side of this momentous event. The opera’s music is an excellent example of Adams’s signature “minimalist” style, while the libretto spotlights the complex feelings and conflicted loyalties of the Manhattan Project physicists—a small group of people tasked with developing the most destructive weapon the world had ever seen.

Watch John Adams’s opera Doctor Atomic, get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Met’s production, and use the accompanying Educator Guide to explore a defining moment of the twentieth century through the work of one of America’s greatest living composers.

MN Original | Tara Sweeney: Painter

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Lifelong artist and educator, Tara Sweeney creates an alphabet picture book in Swedish with illustrator Nate Christopherson. The book features objects from the American-Swedish Institute's archival collection, many of which represent objects brought over on immigrant journeys. Sweeney learns about past journeys while contemplating present day immigrant and refugee experiences.

Julius Caesar, Rhetoric, and Relevance | Shakespeare Uncovered

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Learn about how Shakespeare uses rhetoric in his play Julius Caesar in two videos from Shakespeare Uncovered. After the assassination of Julius Caesar, Antony and Brutus both do what they think is best to protect Rome. This resource works best after students have read Act III, sc. 2, to ensure they are already familiar with the speeches of Antony and Brutus before Caesar’s burial. How do the two characters frame their choices through language? How do they persuade or fail to persuade their audience? This resource also addresses how Shakespeare’s use of rhetoric can inform our understanding of how rhetoric is used today. During a time when our sources of information are increasingly fractured and curated, how do we make sense of opinions versus facts? How does rhetoric operate in the realm of social media? Support materials engage students with contemporary connections through discussion questions, teaching tips, and a background essay.

Shakespeare Uncovered combines history, biography, iconic performances, new analysis, and the personal passions of its celebrated hosts to tell the stories behind the stories of Shakespeare’s greatest plays. To learn more and view full episodes, visit the Shakespeare Uncovered website and collection page.

 

Reconstruction: The Birth of a Nation - Rewriting History through Propaganda

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The Birth of a Nation was a 1915 silent film, directed by D.W. Griffith, fictionalizing the history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. At the time of its release, it was considered a pioneering artistic achievement in the history of cinema. But, in reality, it was a racist piece of “Lost Cause” propaganda, seeking to transform the Ku Klux Klan from terrorists into heroic vigilantes who rescued the South from uncivilized blacks. 

This film rewrote the history of Reconstruction, seeking to redeem the South and erase the positive contributions and progress that African Americans had made. African American men are vilified and shown as vengeful former slaves, while the Ku Klux Klan is celebrated as protecting the country from the perils of racial equality. Not only was this portrayal untrue, it was the opposite of what actually happened. During Reconstruction, the Klan terrorized and assaulted countless numbers of African Americans in order to intimidate them from exercising their basic rights, including voting. 

The NAACP, founded in 1909, strongly opposed the film and even sought to have it banned. But their protests were not successful. The film screened widely, even at the White House for President Woodrow Wilson. Not long after the film's release, the KKK was reborn. 

During the 20th century, many Americans learned about Reconstruction through the distorted viewpoint in films like The Birth of a Nation. The film is considered the greatest blockbuster of the silent film era. Thomas Dixon, who wrote the book The Clansman, on which The Birth of a Nation was based, reveled in its success. "The real purpose of my film was to revolutionize Northern audiences that would transform every man into a Southern partisan for life."

Creating Podcasts | Media Arts Toolkit

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As an English/digital media teacher at Henry Clay High School in Lexington, Kentucky, Jason Behler has found that his students become deeply engaged when creating their own podcasts, especially because he allows them great freedom in selecting their own genre and content. His students develop skills in collaboration and time management as well as technical and communication skills. Podcasting does not need to be confined to a class in digital media, and it does not require expensive equipment. Podcasting can be integrated into any content area to add spark to your lessons.

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