Health/Phys. Ed.

OnStage In America: HONKY | Your People, My People

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Skymax Shoes is a shoe company catering to African American kids. The new CEO, a white man, tells his chief designer, a black man, about how he plans to use racial attitudes to sell shoes. His attitudes are so callous and insulting that he infuriates his designer and drives him to quit.

3-D Printing Prosthetics Design & Creation with Professor Jon Schull from RIT | Move to Include

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Learn about how 3-D printing has created a worldwide community of volunteers to design and print prosthetics for those with physical disabilities and provide them at little or no cost. Professor Jon Schull of Rochester Institute of Technology explains the work & RIT's part in the project. Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Seguridad Alimentaria-segmento 1

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En este segmento la Dra. Ada Laureano Carrasquillo, profesora de nutrición define los términos seguridad alimentaria y escasez. También nos habla del efecto de los cambios climatológicos y el consumo recurrente y cómo éstos producen un problema de riesgo de seguridad alimentaria.

Cyber-bullying

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Cyber-bullying is where one or more children targets another through technology such as the Internet, cell phones, or other devices to threaten, harass, or embarrass another child. Cyber-bullying goes beyond just bullying, because it can follow you home (e.g., through text or e-mail messages, blogs, social networking web site, etc.). You can stop cyber-bullying by not responding to any of it, saving the evidence, and reporting it.

The Human Face of Big Data | Acquiring Language

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By analyzing 8-9 million words of speech recorded over a two year period, Professor Deb Roy at the MIT Medialab was able to distinguish the exact moment that his son learned a new word. Taking that idea of a “word birth,” the study looked at the gestation period of a word. By tracking the use of a particular word - what was happening, where in the house were they, and how were they moving about - the visual information provided contexts in which the words were used. The study revealed that prior theories of speech development were incorrect.

Gross Science | How Different Diseases Make You Smell

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Learn how diseases can make you have different body odors, in this episode of Gross Science from NOVA. Doctors have known since the time of Hippocrates that diseases produce distinct odors in people. For example, typhoid makes you smell like freshly baked brown bread, and the skin of people with yellow fever smells like a butcher shop. Dogs can actually sniff out certain types of cancer. Scientists are working on creating smelling machines that could be used to detect diseases. This resource is part of the NOVA: Gross Science Collection.

The Human Face of Big Data | The Smallest Heartbeat

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Twenty percent of all premature babies contract serious infections while in the hospital. By harnessing millions of heartbeat measurements from the ICU each day, Dr. Carolyn McGregor found she could detect a baby’s infection at least one day before it became symptomatic, giving physicians a potential 24-hour jump on treating and beating the bacteria. McGregor’s team, called Project Artemis, is still in the process of publishing and confirming the findings, but they hope that ICUs around the world will soon begin using their data as an early-warning system, enabling babies to begin receiving lifesaving treatments before it’s too late.

Greater Boston | Is Autism Genetic or Environmental?

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Conflicting theories about what causes autism are explored in this video segment from Greater Boston. Scientists still don’t have an answer, and while many focus on genetics, some suspect that environment may also play a role. Mark Blaxill, whose daughter Michaela is autistic, explains why he thinks the disorder is triggered by environmental factors. Dr. Martha Herbert, who studies the brains of autistic children, says that toxins like metals, pesticides, and PCBs have all come under suspicion. But other scientists, like Dr. David Miller, say the key to autism lies in a person’s genes.

Are Your New Year's Resolutions Bound to Fail? | PBS Idea Channel

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New Year's Resolutions are incredibly hard to keep. Watch this special episode to find out why, and tell us what you think!

Be Kind Online

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How do we act when we are on the Internet? Here are some good manners for when we are on the Internet. Use good words, not rude or bad words. Be patient with others. Sometimes others are beginners and are just learning how to use the Internet.

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