Health/Phys. Ed.

My Love, Don't Cross That River (2016)

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Jin Mo-young’s film My Love, Don't Cross that River documents the final years of a South Korean couple, 89-year-old Kang Gye-Yeol and 98-year-old Jo Byeong-Man, who have been married for 76 years. The film, which follows the couple over 15 months, explores the complex and often challenging experience of growing old and facing death.

Grade Level: 
High
Length: 
01:26
My Love, Don't Cross That River

Teen Fights for Toxic Waste Cleanup

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New York student Shadia Wood tells how she became an environmental activist in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute’s New Leaders Initiative. Wood lives near several toxic waste sites and was concerned to learn that the New York Superfund—the money set aside for cleaning such sites in her state—had gone bankrupt. Working with other students and environmental groups, Wood lobbied the New York legislature for eight years until the Superfund program was refinanced. Environmentalist Laura Haight says that this law was the most important environmental law passed in New York State in a decade.

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

Consumption Food and Choices

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As with all things in life, food and health are about balance. Since no two people are the same, different diets meet different needs. With a little help and enough determination, your goals are well within reach.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Content Area: 
Health/Phys. Ed.
Family/Consumer Science
Play Time: 
120 min.
Consumption Food and Choices

Skeletons | Science Trek

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Without a skeleton, we would be a heap of skin and muscles. A skeleton gives shape and form to the bodies of vertebrate animals. The set of bones known as vertebrae make up the spine, and others such as ribs and skull protect the major organs. Bones are actually living tissue, and the center of the bone, or marrow, is where your blood is created. Find out more about your bones.

Is Video Game Addiction Real? | Above the Noise

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As the video game Fortnite is taking over the world, there's a rising panic that some gamers are getting full-on addicted, with headlines like “Parenting the Fortnite Addict” and “I almost lost my sons to Fortnite” popping up all over the place. Even the World Health Organization is worried about video games—just recently, it officially recognized “Gaming Disorder” as a mental health condition. But it’s not that simple. The American Psychiatric Association isn’t convinced, and says there’s not enough research showing that video game addiction is its own disorder. So what’s going on? Is video game addiction REALLY a thing? Find out in the latest Above the Noise episode. And join the discussion about video game addiction with other students on KQED Learn by going to Activity in Support Materials. (Log in required.)

What Causes Suicide? | You Are Not Alone

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Experts in adolescent medicine and suicide research explain the factors that contribute to the rise in youth suicides. Dr. Hatim Omar, an adolescent medicine specialist at the University of Kentucky, and Melinda Moore, PhD, a psychology professor at Eastern Kentucky University, both agree that limiting access to lethal means of suicide is crucial to reducing overall rates. This video segment is part of You Are Not Alone, a youth mental health series produced by KET.

Diagnosing and Treating Depression | You Are Not Alone

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A psychiatrist discusses the reasons for the increase in depression among teenagers. Dr. Christopher Peters, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Louisville’s School of Medicine, says that in recent years more adolescents have been diagnosed as meeting the criteria for depression, with an increase of around three to four percent over the past 10 years. This video segment is part of You Are Not Alone, a youth mental health series produced by KET.

Beating the Odds

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When a degree is your goal, nothing can hold you back. Beating the Odds highlights how students everywhere are overcoming obstacles to get to college, standing on their struggles to reach even greater heights. Hear how leaders like Former First Lady Michelle Obama and Paralympian Scout Bassett made it to graduation—and beyond—by ignoring the odds and betting on themselves.

Note: Page 10 of the Viewing Guide incorrectly states that “Michelle Obama was the first in her family to attend college.” Mrs. Obama’s older brother, Craig Robinson, went to Princeton ahead of her. He graduated in 1983, and she graduated from the same institution in 1985.

On their Own | Not Broken

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Brynn and Gabriel begin their journeys toward independence and share their determination to move forward.

This video segment is part of Not Broken, a candid and hopeful documentary about seven young people fighting to live their dreams despite their mental health challenges, produced by Arizona Public Media.

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