Health/Phys. Ed.

No Bigger Than a Minute

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For forty years, four-foot-tall filmmaker Steven Delano has lived his life as a reluctant celebrity, disavowing his dwarf deviance and avoiding both the benefits and potential traumas of real self-discovery. In making this film Steven uses his license-of-stature and a healthy dose of irreverent humor to show first-hand how a genetic mutation marks a person for life. This resource group includes three clips associated with the film, as well as a related activity.

OnStage In America: HONKY | Looking for Something

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The black shoe designer is confronted on the subway by two teenagers from the ghetto who offer him drugs. The kids, projections of his own prejudices, force him to search his conscience and resolve his own conflicted attitudes toward race. In the end, he returns to his white girlfriend.

Big River: A King Corn Companion | Farm Nitrates in the Water Supply

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Learn how farm runoff impacts water quality and human health. Tour the water treatment plant in Des Moines, Iowa, and learn how the water is filtered, in this video excerpted from the independent film Big River: A King Corn Companion. Hear how high nitrate content in water can affect human health, causing such problems as blue baby syndrome, and understand why water treatment plants in agricultural regions need nitrate removal facilities because of the pollution from fertilizer runoff.

The Strange Science of the Placebo Effect | It's Okay to Be Smart

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How do sugar pills really interact with our bodies?

Environmental Justice: Opposing a Toxic Waste Landfill

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In this video segment, adapted from Earthkeeping: Toxic Racism, learn about the beginning of the environmental justice movement. Meet various experts and leaders who describe the issues of environmental racism and justice, and learn about the watershed event—the controversy over the location of a toxic landfill in Warren County, North Carolina—that brought the issues to national attention in the early 1980s. See footage of the residents protesting the transport of PCB-contaminated soil to their community, and hear about how the incident triggered further investigations into the relationship between communities of color and toxins.

Fire Safety in High Rises

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The goals of fire safety are clear: protect people, the structure, and the structure's contents. When planning a new building or retrofitting an existing one, it is the responsibility of structural engineers to create a design that will accomplish these goals. Their challenge is to incorporate into the building design a reliable means for evacuation and a system to control the fire's spread in the event that a fire does break out. In this video segment adapted from NOVA, learn how an old technology—fire sprinklers—and new computer systems can work together to help prevent fires large and small from turning modern multi-story buildings into towering infernos.

The Experience of Being Trolled | PBS Idea Channel

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In a very special episode, Mike rethinks his approach to hosting. Most of you have heard the phrase "Don't Feed the Trolls," but do trolls actually serve a purpose? Found in every place people converse online, their combative rhetoric can be annoying, even harmful. Can a valid argument be made for the value of trolls? 

When Do Memes Stop Being Funny? | PBS Idea Channel

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"Old meme is old." But why is this such a bad thing? Once the height of internetiness, the sight of a LOLCat is now unforgivable. Memes become passe very quickly: after just months or even weeks of a new meme, we tire of the once hugely popular joke. Why does this happen, and so rapidly? Is it a reflection of the sheer volume of visual information we absorb from the internet? Or, does it say something about this specific visual culture? 

What Do Hot Sauce Labels Say About America? | PBS Idea Channel

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Peppers are the essence of hot sauce, and hot sauce is the essence of spicy. You might be a hot sauce lover, but how much thought have you given to their labels? If you've ever taken a second to examine them, you might notice some patterns and similarities amongst them. What does this say about Americans' attitude towards hot sauces, or even towards food in general? 

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