Health/Phys. Ed.

Teen Fights for Toxic Waste Cleanup

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New York student Shadia Wood tells how she became an environmental activist in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute’s New Leaders Initiative. Wood lives near several toxic waste sites and was concerned to learn that the New York Superfund—the money set aside for cleaning such sites in her state—had gone bankrupt. Working with other students and environmental groups, Wood lobbied the New York legislature for eight years until the Superfund program was refinanced. Environmentalist Laura Haight says that this law was the most important environmental law passed in New York State in a decade.

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

Consumption Food and Choices

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As with all things in life, food and health are about balance. Since no two people are the same, different diets meet different needs. With a little help and enough determination, your goals are well within reach.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Content Area: 
Health/Phys. Ed.
Family/Consumer Science
Play Time: 
120 min.
Consumption Food and Choices

Pizza Gardens | Think Garden

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This video from KET’s Think Garden collection demonstrates how to make a pizza with ingredients from both spring and summer gardens. Follow students from Cane Run Elementary in Louisville as they make fresh spring pizzas using greens, garlic, olive oil and homemade cheese with the Food Literacy Project at Oxmoor Farm. Then head back to school with the Cane Run students as they make pizzas with traditional toppings from their own school garden like tomatoes, peppers, and basil.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions. 

Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury

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Every year, as many as 3.8 million brain injuries occur in athletics, and they are more common among children and students than star athletes. We often hear about concussions in professional football, but they can be a problem in any sport and at any age. To ensure the lifelong wellness of active youth, it’s essential to better understand the brain and the process of safely navigating brain injuries. 

This media gallery features segments from the award-winning AETN documentary Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury. Through eye-opening interviews with former professional players, medical experts, and renowned researchers, we explore the short-term effects and long-term risks of concussions, how to handle them when they occur, and the best methods of preventing them.

In 2017, Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury received an Emmy for Best Director and Post Production from the National Academy of TV Arts & Sciences, a Silver Telly Award for Best General Documentary, and a Bronze Telly Award for General Education.

For further information, please visit AETN's Bell Ringer: The Invisible Brain Injury webpage.

Youth Mental Health Focus Group: Students

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In this focus group, high school students discuss a variety of issues related to youth mental health. The video can be beneficial to multiple audiences.

School districts, PTA/PTO meetings, grandparent support groups, foster care training programs, and mental health providers would benefit from experiencing the honest, heartfelt input of youth and their views on mental illness and the struggles they face in everyday situations. Youth input could result in supportive and change-producing interventions that meet actual youth needs rather than the adults’ perceived needs of youth.

It will be important to remind adults that youth today have very different perspectives and deal with unique stressors that are different from the adult generation. Being non-judgmental, empathetic, and compassionate about their struggles is necessary in understanding and intervening with youth of today.

Adults can be advocates, reduce stigma, and make mental health matter. And a teacher can be the one person who makes a difference for a student.

Youth in general would also benefit from the insight provided by the participants in the video. Hearing the challenges that their peers encounter can stimulate and encourage open discussion about individual, unique struggles that viewers face. The video can also be used by focus group facilitators.

During these types of discussions with youth, it is necessary to set healthy boundaries. Remind youth to be respectful of the subject matter and differences of opinions and experiences that may exist. Encourage them to avoid using names or identifying information when describing another person’s experience. During focus groups, always remind youth to protect and maintain confidentiality so that each person feels safe in providing open and honest input.

The Whole School/Whole Child Model | You Are Not Alone

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In the “whole school, whole child” model, everyone collaborates to improve learning by addressing the many factors that affect it, including mental health. Kathryn Tillett, AWARE director at the Kentucky Department of Education, and Melissa Goins, director of family and youth resource centers at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, talk about their long-term goals of making the “whole child” model that is common in public health departments just as common in public education throughout Kentucky. This video segment is part of You Are Not Alone, a youth mental health series produced by KET.

Pam Boyers: Associate Vice Chancellor for Clinical Simulation, UNMC | What If – Innovator Insights

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NOTE: Spanish version is captions only.

Pam Boyers helped create iExcel at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE. iExcel uses simulation and visualization technologies to improve health care education.

Innovation Insights features short video interviews with innovators and creators answering questions about things like influences, passions, and mistakes, and offering advice for the next generation of innovators.

Incarceration and Mental Health Court | Not Broken

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Living with mental illness can make it more likely that someone will experience incarceration. Mental Health Court, available in some communities, can help support the needs of the defendants.

This video segment is part of Not Broken, a candid and hopeful documentary about seven young people fighting to live their dreams despite their mental health challenges, produced by Arizona Public Media.

 

Know Ohio | Blind History

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Ohio has been a leader in educating the blind since 1837 when it established the first public school for the blind. Today, it is called The Ohio State School for the Blind, and there are other specialized schools around the state preparing the visually impaired for productive lives.

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