Health/Phys. Ed.

This Video Is Just for You | BrainCraft

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Persuasive and personalized messages are around all of us. Find out how they influence our response, and what happens in the brain when they do.

Career Connections | Prosthetist Columbus

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Prosthetists evaluate and measure patients for artificial limbs—designing and making prostheses that fit patient needs and the patient's lifestyle.

In Small Doses: Arsenic

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This video segment adapted from In Small Doses: Arsenic explains how arsenic contaminates groundwater and how people can protect themselves from its hazards. Most arsenic in groundwater comes from minerals in rocks that dissolve through natural processes. But the conditions of the water must be right for arsenic to occur in high concentrations. In the video, scientists also detail the U.S. drinking water standards, the possible health effects of exposure to arsenic, and the steps that cities and private homeowners should take to ensure arsenic levels in their water supplies are safe.

Myles Porter: "Part Rival, Part Respect."

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Myles Porter talks about his judo rival and nemesis, Brazil's Antonio Tenorio da Silva. Porter discusses what drives him to compete, in this video from Medal Quest.

Tobacco, Advertising, and Cancer - Media Literacy Activities | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Media can be a powerful force in shaping perceptions about products and our own consumption habits. During the early to mid 20th Century, cigarette advertising was pervasive and the use of it was high. In the 1970s, a wave of anti-smoking advertising was released which ultimately changed the public’s perception and use of tobacco. The media encouraged people to smoke and when scientists proved that smoking was harmful the media in turn encouraged people to stop. In viewing these three clips from Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, students will understand how media can influence the habits and attitudes of an audience.

Your Brain on Tetris | BrainCraft

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Tetris taps into our psychology in a complex way. Find out how in this week's episode.

Why People Fake Illness Online | Braincraft

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When illness goes viral, Munchausen by Internet may be the symptom.

West Nile Virus Outbreak in NYC

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This video segment adapted from Rx for Survival follows Tracey McNamara, lead pathologist at the Bronx Zoo, and her work to explain why crows in New York City were literally falling dead from the sky during one summer. McNamara traced the cause of the mystery illness to a mosquito-borne virus, and then suggested a possible link between the animal illness and an ongoing outbreak of human illness. In the end, McNamara was proven correct: it turned out that the same virus—West Nile virus—was infecting both birds and humans.

Jeneen Robinson's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Jeneen Robinson is an African American single mother, as well as a newly ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. She balances the responsibilities of parenting, schoolwork, and creating an original preaching style.

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

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Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.

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