Health/Phys. Ed.

Should Schools Suspend Suspensions? | Above the Noise

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Suspensions have some unintended consequences. They disproportionately target minorities, and some students who get suspended are more likely to repeat a grade, drop out of school and become involved in the criminal justice system. But suspensions are viewed by some as a necessary tool to keep schools safe. It may not be great for the suspended student, but they say it’s more important to keep everyone else at the school safe. Should suspensions be suspended? Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Barriers to Care | Not Broken

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Living in a rural community comes with its own unique opportunties and challenges, especially when you're growing up.

This video segment is part of Not Broken, a candid and hopeful documentary about seven young people fighting to live their dreams despite their mental health challenges, produced by Arizona Public Media.

Why Recovering from Opioid Addiction Is so Difficult | Addiction

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Examine biological mechanisms in the brain that help explain emotions and behaviors resulting from chronic opioid use, in this video from NOVA: Addiction. Opioids are a class of drug that includes prescription pain relievers as well as illegal drugs such as heroin. Because opioids change brain function and affect biological feedback mechanisms, opioid addiction is especially hard to overcome. Neurological scans of chronic drug users show decreased grey matter in the prefrontal cortex, the region of the brain associated with decision making. This condition lowers one’s ability to control behavior. Opioids can also change the way DNA functions, switching on genes that should be off and switching off genes that should be on. This creates an imbalance that impairs brain function.

Muscles | Science Trek

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The human body has about 650 muscles and they come in all shapes and sizes. The muscles are part of the body’s muscular system. They give the body shape and movement. Find out more about the amazing muscular system.

SciGirls | Atletas Maravillosos 02: Planear y Prueba (Plan and Test)

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The SciGirls take what they learned from their mentor about different types of exercise and decide to create an exercise program that their friends and families can do. The girls research some activities and try out their first version.

Tre Maison Dasan | Interview of the Month

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During a weekly visit, Maison and his dad ask and answer questions in a candid conversation about memories, feelings, their relationship, and incarceration.

Suicide Prevention: An Educator’s Story | You Are Not Alone

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A Kentucky educator reflects on his own struggle with depression and suicidal thoughts, and how faith and family support helped him. Jeremy Cole of Pulaski County uses those insights to help students who show signs of depression and anxiety. This video segment is part of You Are Not Alone, a youth mental health series produced by KET.

Should Colleges Still Require the SATs and ACTs? | Above the Noise

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Taking the SAT or ACT is a right of passage for high school students applying to college. Millions of juniors and seniors take at least one of the tests every year, albeit reluctantly, and most colleges still require it to be considered for admission. But a growing number of colleges are putting much less emphasis on test scores. Many have made the test entirely optional. Should tests like the ACT or SAT still be used for college admissions? Find out in the latest Above the Noise episode. And join the discussion about standardized testing with other students on KQED Learn by going to Activity in Support Materials. (Log in required.)

Angel's Awakening | Not Broken

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A local author of young adult science fiction reflects on her life experiences with bipolar disorder and how they have influenced her writing. 

This video segment is part of Not Broken, a candid and hopeful documentary about seven young people fighting to live their dreams despite their mental health challenges, produced by Arizona Public Media.

The Power of Play in Child Development | STEAM: Ideas That Shape Our World

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Peter Gray, a research professor in the Department of Psychology at Boston College, studies the role of play in human biological and cultural evolution. In his talk at the 2017 IdeaFestival in Louisville, Gray discusses the correlation between the decline of play and the rise of mental disorders, and explains why play is crucial for child development.

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