Health/Phys. Ed.

What Is A Fact? | BrainCraft

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In this episode, we discuss the thought experiment known as the "Knowledge Argument," which seeks to demonstrate that our conscious experience is made up of non-physical things, and the "Mind-Body Problem," where philosophy and neuroscience meet. Is our physical nature our complete nature? Can some facts be subjective, and if so, are they still facts?

Episode 10: Give Me Patients | Road Trip

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We take an inside look at the fields and careers of electronics technology, occupational therapy, emergency medical technician, cosmetology, dental assistant, and construction in this installment of Road Trip. Two girls apply for an entry-level job at a hospital whose strict policy requires employees to have a high school diploma or GED. Featured schools include Northwestern Technical College, Atlanta Technical College, and Gwinnett Technical College. 

Is YouTube Making Us Smarter? | PBS Idea Channel

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Did you know there's a place where you can learn just about anything you'd like? It's true! It's called YouTube! Sure, YouTube has hundreds of thousands of hours of deliciously time-wasting content, but it's much more than just a black hole of pet videos and funny clips. If you know where to go, YouTube has some of the best educational content on the planet! Although watching Kahn Academy all day might be a bit dry, the creativity of YouTube creators has allowed "education" to be transformed in a variety of amazing and engaging ways. YouTube probably won't replace schools anytime soon, but it's a pretty awesome alternative. 

Contaminating the Rockies

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Learn how abandoned mines have been contaminating water supplies in the Rocky Mountains in this video from NOVA: Poison in the Rockies. Beginning in the 1850s, prospectors dug deep mines in the Colorado Rockies in search of precious metals. Today, more than 15,000 abandoned metal mines have filled with acidic water that carries away heavy metals like lead, cadmium, and zinc into mountain streams. In small quantities, some metals are essential to life, but in larger quantities they are toxic. Some newer mines include safeguards to make them more environmentally sound.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Why Vaccines Work | It's Okay to Be Smart

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As more and more parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children or are vaccinating them later, diseases like measles are making a comeback. Are vaccines safe? How do vaccines work? Why do some people claim there is a link between vaccines and autism? This week we look at why are people afraid of something that has saved so many lives, and look at the history and science of vaccines.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Food Justice

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Urban high school students discuss problems in food systems and what can be done about them in this adaptation of a video they created in collaboration with the Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island. They discuss lack of access to fresh fruits and vegetables in urban areas; the high cost of healthy food compared to cheap and abundant junk food; the lack of food grown locally; and animal cruelty. The students offer solutions to these problems, such as urban gardening, buying local food at farmers markets, composting, recycling, and tree planting.

Teen Maps Contaminants from a Coal Plant

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Meet Marisol, a high school student from Little Village in Chicago in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute. Hear about how she volunteered within her community and found out about the toxins produced by the local coal-burning power plant. Learn about some of the health risks associated with such pollution, and observe how she helped create OurMap of Environmental Justice, an interactive online map that includes videos, facts, and descriptions of toxic pollutants in the community.

How Much Can Data Improve Your Health? | PBS Idea Channel

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You may have heard of the Jawbone, Fitbit, Nike Fuelband, or one of the myriad of other wearable self-tracking gadgets. You might even be wearing one right now! These gadgets help track everything from hours slept, calories consumed, to number of steps taken in a given day. But, can they actually make you healthy? Sure they provide us with tons of data about our bodies, but what do we do with all that information? Is it just about the knowing? Or does this actually motivate us to change and enhance our behavior? And if it does, can that be a bad thing? 

Finding Cures Is Hard

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Explore the difficulty of finding cures for genetic diseases like cystic fibrosis, even after the genetic defects that caused the disorders have been identified. From NOVA: Cracking the Code of Life.

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