Chapter 1 (Spring 2017)

In the Media Library: 

Wayside School Is Falling Down (Unabridged)

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More teetering tales and quirky characters from the 30th floor of towering Wayside School. The craziness continues.

Author: 
Grade Level: 
Lexile: 
440L
Length: 
03:32
Wayside School Is Falling Down (Unabridged)

Frozen Summer

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Copies: 29

It's 1816, and Remembrance Nye and her family are enduring a cold, hard summer in their new home in western New York. There's barely any food, since Papa's crops were destroyed by the late frosts. Mem's mama has never gotten used to their new home and finds it even harder to cope after she gives birth to baby Lily. Papa puts Mem in charge of caring for the baby, her younger brother, and their sick mother. Though Mem tries her best, it's hard to do the chores and watch them every moment. Then the worst happens: One stormy night Mama and Lily disappear.

Lexile: 
810L

Magic Tree House #9: Dolphins At Daybreak (Unabridged)

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Morgan le Fay will make Jack and Annie masters of the tree house if only they can solve four riddles. "Dolphins at Daybreak" begins the third set of four books in the magical series, as Jack and Annie embark upon solving riddle number three in a whole new world under the ocean!

Grade Level: 
Lexile: 
350L
Length: 
00:38
Magic Tree House #9: Dolphins At Daybreak (Unabridged)

Pink and Say (Unabridged)

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Drawing from the rich store of Civil War reminiscences handed down in her family, acclaimed author Patricia Polacco tells the true story of a remarkable wartime friendship between a young white Union soldier, Say Curtis, and a young black Union soldier, Pinkus Aylee. They are captured by Confederate soldiers and sent to Andersonville Prison.

Grade Level: 
Lexile: 
590L
Length: 
00:23
Pink and Say (Unabridged)

Casey at the Bat

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Copies: 1

"And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout; But there is no joy in Mudville-mighty Casey has struck out." Those lines have echoed through the decades, the final stanza of a poem published pseudonymously in the June 3, 1888, issue of the San Francisco Examiner. Its author would rather have seen it forgotten. Instead, Ernest Thayer's poem has taken a well-deserved place as an enduring icon of Americana.