Health/Phys. Ed.

Social Studies (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - ELA (X)

Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign | Move to Include

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Spread the Word to End the Word is an educational campaign to increase awareness for the need to respect and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The initiative is supported by Special Olympics and Best Buddies and numerous other organizations. It promotes using people first accepting language in schools and in the community.

Visit the Move to Include collection for more resources. 

Healthy School Lunch Menus Spark Political Food Fight

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Use the debate about healthy school lunch rules to show students how Congress works and spark a discussion with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from May 30, 2014. The 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act required schools to use more wholesome ingredients and set fat, sugar and sodium limits. But Republican lawmakers have proposed a one-year waiver, arguing that students won't eat the new offerings or that schools can't afford them.

Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law Subsidies

Icon: 
Streaming icon

See how President Obama responded to the Supreme Court's decision to uphold his health care law with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 25, 2015.

Rikers Island Announces Reforms Following Death of Former Inmate

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn why Kalief Browder became the face of prison reform at Rikers Island with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 23, 2015. 

The Doctor Will See You Now… Online

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Find out how technology is changing the way doctors see patients with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from July 13, 2015.

Ebola Outbreak in Africa Claims Nearly 900 Lives

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Four African nations are fighting to contain the largest outbreak in history of Ebola, a virus with no cure. Update your students with the latest on the health crisis with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials from August 5th, 2014.

Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Above the Noise host Shirin Ghaffary weighs the potential health risks of drinking energy drinks, and compares them to other sugary, caffeinated beverages. Energy drinks are a billion dollar industry and their popularity keeps growing despite health concerns. We are warned they are particularly dangerous for children and teens -- and there have even been reports of deaths linked to energy drink consumption. In this video we take a closer look at the science to see if energy drinks are really as bad as the hype, and what it is about them that has doctors concerned.

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

How Gold Star Families Became a Political Issue | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

For the sake of time, we recommend stopping the video at 3m:23s.

President Donald Trump continues to face criticism for a condolence call to the Gold Star family of Sgt. La David Johnson, a Special Forces soldier recently killed in Niger. Gold Star Families are the relatives of US military members who died in battle. There was a time when a political leader would never politicize the death of a service member or question a grieving family, said Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report. “It’s a little bit like the customer’s always right. Right? The grieving family is always right in this case,” she said. Walter added this was no longer the case after Trump criticized the Khan family, a Gold Star family, after they spoke out against him at the Democratic National Convention.

October 25, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

How Widespread Is Student Homelessness? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Student homelessness in the US is a tricky thing to quantify. HUD -- the federal government's Department of Housing and Urban Development -- controls most of the money used to help the homeless. But, that agency misses about 4 in 5 homeless students. Why? It’s all about how you define the term “homeless”. According to HUD, you’re only considered homeless if you’re living in a shelter or living on the streets. But according to the Department of Education, about 80% of the 1.3 million homeless students living in the US are couch surfing, living in motels, or doubling up with family or friends. These students aren’t eligible for HUD money, so increasingly, it’s up to schools to provide help. Host Myles Bess explores how homeless students get the help they need when different federal agencies use competing definitions to define who’s homeless.

Should Sexting Be a Crime? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Numerous research surveys and school scandals indicate that teens are engaging in sexting, and as technology and trends rapidly change, it’s hard for parents, schools and the law to create rules around this behavior. Watch the latest Above the Noise video to help students discuss the tricky issue of sexting.

Introduction to the Smoking Section

Icon: 
Streaming icon

New York Voices looks at the battle over fresh air in bars and restaurants. For reasons concerning public health, states all over the country are beginning to ban smoking in public places. For example, in 2003, New York State became the third state to stamp out cigarette smoking in virtually all businesses. Legislation ended smoking in certain restaurants, bars and other public places. Smokers describe when they began to smoke and why, how they feel about smoking and how they are viewed as smokers by others. Learn more about the controversy regarding banning smoking in The Smoking Section, another video in this series.

High School Football Players Discuss the Pressure to Stay in the Game, Despite Concussions

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore why, despite reports on the dangers of concussions, high school athletes feel pressured to hide their injuries in order to get back in the game with this video fromPBS NewsHourvideo from February 17th, 2014. According to the National Academy of Sciences, there are 11 recorded concussions for every 10,000 high school games and practices, twice the rate of college players. But researchers believe the number is actually much higher because many go unreported.

70 Years After Nuclear Test, New Mexico Town Fights for Compensation

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Listen to residents of a New Mexico town talk about their concerns over exposure to nuclear radiation with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from July 28, 2015.

Pages