Geometry

Geometry (X)

Shapes in Transportation

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Two children explore the different shapes they see during a road trip to the city. Defines geometric terms such as angle, cylinder, dimension, line segment, parallel, prism, and rhombus.

Shapes in Transportation

What's Your Angle, Pythagoras?

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Young Pythagoras can't seem to stay out of trouble. Every time he tries to help, people get angry. What's a curious kid to do?


On a trip to Egypt, Pythagoras' curiosity helps him discover the secret of the right triangle. A clever introduction to the Pythagorean Theorem.

What's Your Angle, Pythagoras?

Sir Cumference and the Isle of Immeter

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When young Per visits her uncle Sir Cumference, aunt Lady Di of Ameter, and her cousin Radius, they teach her how to play Inners and Edges. After Per finds a clue linking the game to the mysterious castle of the Countess Areana, she and Radius sail to the island of Immeter. There, they have to decipher cryptic clues while avoiding a sea serpent. To unlock the island's secret, Per has to figure out how to find the perimeter and area of a circle. Only then can she become Per of Immeter.


Sir Cumference and the Isle of Immeter

Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone

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King Arthur has issued a challenge. The first knight to find the sword, Edgecalibur, will be the next king. Sir Cumference, Lady Di of Ameter, and Radius help their friend, Vertex, find the sword.


Keywords: king, heir, geometry, math, quest, puzzles

Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone

Sir Cumference and the Great Knight of Angleland

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On a quest to earn his knighthood, Radius uses different geometry concepts to find and rescue a missing king.


Keywords: king, heir, geometry, math, quest, puzzles, knight

Sir Cumference and the Great Knight of Angleland

Sir Cumference and the First Round Table

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What would you do if the neighboring kingdom were threatening war? Naturally, you'd call your strongest and bravest knights together to come up with a solution. But when your conference table causes more problems than the threat of your enemy, you need expert help. Enter Sir Cumference, his wife Lady Di of Ameter, and their son Radius. With the help of the carpenter, Geo of Metry, this sharp-minded team designs the perfect table conducive to discussing the perfect peace plan. Thanks to Sir Cumference and the First Round Table, even the most hesitant will be romancing math.

Sir Cumference and the First Round Table

Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi

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When Sir Cumference drinks a potion which turns him into a dragon, his son Radius searches for the magic number known as pi which will restore him to his former shape.


Keywords: king, heir, geometry, math, quest, puzzles, dragon

Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi

Let's Face It! Bilateral Symmetry (2016)

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This multi award-winning series takes the mystery out of math and puts the fun back into learning. Each episode takes viewers to Uncle Norm's workshop, usually the scene of his latest misadventure. The Radicals—cousins Kevin and Alanna—come to the rescue every time by enlisting experts to help them solve Uncle Norm's problems with mathematical solutions.

Grade Level: 
Elementary
Length: 
00:15
Let's Face It! Bilateral Symmetry

Makey Takey: Shape Identification

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This kit is designed for use as a center activity with a Pre-K or Kindergarten class. This was designed to address the NY Common Core Math standards PK.G: Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles), and K.G: Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres). The accompanying lesson plan can be found later in the record.

The kit includes the following materials:

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Predicting Travel Time Using Line Graphs

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In this Cyberchase video segment, Harry wants to visit his grandmother. He decides that the cheapest way for him to get there is to travel by unicycle, but he wonders if he can get there before dark. Using a line graph, he tries to predict the amount of time it will take to travel the twenty miles, assuming he travels at a constant speed. Once he sets out on his unicycle, he charts his progress on a new line graph. After the first hour he appears to be ahead of schedule, but he is not able to keep up the pace and soon finds himself falling behind.

Calculating Rectangular Area | Cyberchase

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In this video segment from Cyberchase, the CyberSquad must measure two differently-shaped parcels of land to determine which has a larger area. The CyberSquad uses tarps, fence posts, and finally a grid made out of rope to count squares and determine the area of each parcel.

Scale City: Greetings from Sky-Vue Drive-In

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Greetings from Sky-Vue Drive-In takes students on a tour through the history of drive-in theaters and a visit to one that's still open and thriving in Winchester, Kentucky. Looking at shadows through the drive-in movie projector introduces the relationship of a shadow's size to its distance from the light source.

Volume of Prisms: Volume of a Rectangular Prism - Fractional Cubes

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To find the volume of a rectangular prism, divide it into fractional cubes, find the volume of one cube, then multiply that area by the number of cubes.

Prisms with Quadrilateral Faces

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In this video from KCPT, watch an animated demonstration of finding the surface area of rectangular and trapezoidal prisms. In the accompanying classroom activity, students do two hands-on activities: they calculate the surface area of an object in the shape of a rectangular or trapezoidal prism and design and construct a rectangular or trapezoidal prism with a surface area of 24 square inches. To get the most from this lesson, students should be comfortable calculating the area of parallelograms. Prior exposure to rectangular and trapezoidal prisms and to surface area is helpful.

Area of a Trapezoid

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Learn about the characteristics of a trapezoid and how to find its area in this video from KCPT. In the accompanying classroom activity, students develop the formula for the area of a trapezoid by decomposing it into smaller, more familiar shapes. 

This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School collection.

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