Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Professional (X) - U.S. History (X)

The Curious Mister Catesby

Icon: 
Streaming icon

(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island | EGG: The Arts Show

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the lands on the island were abandoned to the slaves. Frankie Quimby of the Georgia Sea Island Singers speaks of her pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. She also tells how the songs of the slaves also served as escape songs. For more about Sapelo Island, see “Ben Hall of Sapelo Island” and “Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island.”

We are the Music

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore the music and dance sequences of 11 cultural groups who have settled in Santa Fe, New Mexico over the past 700 years. These diverse communities include the Native Americans, Spanish, Mexicans, Crypto-Jewish, Celtic, German, Greek, Japanese, Tibetan, Sikh and the Central Americans. All performers and narrators in these segments are of school-age.

Tony Bennett | Billy Joel: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Experience a musical tribute to Billy Joel in this clip featuring vocalist Tony Bennett at the annual Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. In commemoration of George and Ira Gershwin's contributions to American song and culture, the Library of Congress names an annual award to an American musican. The George and Ira Gershwin Collection is housed in the Music Division of the Library of Congress and provides a wealth of orchestrations, lyric sheets, librettos, and audio recordings.

James Hope

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Hope volunteered for the army when the Civil Way erupted in 1861. He participated in nearly a dozen battles and made sketches of what he witnessed on the battlefield. After the war, he turned his sketches into a series of large paintings that are now displayed at Antietam National Battlefield Park.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

Icon: 
Streaming icon

[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | The Decline of Railroads and Streetcars

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Discover how the building and use of railroads declined due to the popularity of automobiles and trucks. One effect was the development of regional and short line railroads that served smaller communities. Several larger cities used local electric streetcars until the automobiles took over.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | In Mid-continent and “The Holy Dog”

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Discover how transportation has affected every step of North Dakota history. North Dakota’s position in the center of North America has always made transportation a challenge with even the earliest peoples seeking ways to cover large distances of land. The arrival of horses to the Northern Plains had a radical effect on the Native American culture and way of life.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Roads from WWII to the Present

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how World War II meant funding was diverted to all but strategic roads and highways. After the war, the state had to play catch-up on road maintenance, helped by federal funding of the interstate system. In today's world, larger and heavier trucks are critical to transporting freight. In rural North Dakota, providing local transit for a growing senior citizen population is a big issue.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Water Communication

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how rivers already provided an avenue for the movement of goods and people in 1803 when Lewis and Clark traveled up the Missouri River to look for a waterway to the West.

Thomas Edison | Inventor and Entrepreneur Video

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Thomas Edison, a leader of American innovation, was responsible for developing many modern devices. He created the first organized industrial research laboratory where he and a team of scientists and innovators brought to life home electricity, the light bulb, car batteries, movies, music players, and thousands of other innovations. Through a video and primary source activities, students will learn about Edison’s remarkable business of innovation and some of his 1,093 patented devices. 

View the Lesson Plan.

Amelia Earhart | Aviator, Record-breaker, and Activist Video

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Amelia Earhart was a pioneer of early aviation, courageously flying airplanes at a time when the risks were high. Equally bold was her pursuit of a career as a woman in a non-traditional field. Through two primary source activities and a short video, students will learn about Earhart’s passion for flying and determination to succeed as a female aviator.

View the Lesson Plan

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Individual Freedom

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the history of automobiles in North Dakota. The automobile age gave freedom of movement and choice for passengers and freight. With more people driving cars, the push came for better roads.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | “A Reluctant and Homesick Pig”

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the history of steamboats on the Red River. Although its course meandered like a lost and homesick pig, the Red River of the North was a major artery for steamboats, which coordinated with stagecoaches from St. Paul to Fort Abercrombie.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Peerless Transportation

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the role of railroads in North Dakota history. In their time, railroads had no peer in their ability to move people and goods, although shipping costs were high. The railroad companies helped increase immigration to North Dakota by actively marketing the opportunities here to foreigners, especially Scandinavians and Germans from Russia.

Pages