Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X) - Economics (X)

110: The Rise of Modern Georgia, Part I (Reconstruction and Growth) | Georgia Stories

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This episode tells the history of Georgia's culture from the Civil War onward. The first segment discusses the importance of trains to Atlanta both during and after the Civil War. The second segment tells the struggles of the Reconstruction era, with particular focus on the lives of sharecroppers. The final segment discusses Georgia music starting in the Civil War and the lasting impact the music of the south has had on American musical forms.

216: Modern Georgia, Part IV | Georgia Stories

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Major events and industry are vital to the Georgia economy. Each year, special events, such as conventions, trades hows, and sporting events, happen all across the state of Georgia and bring in millions of dollars. These events attract new people to the state every year, and while they are there, they can see a show that, perhaps, will feature a new up and coming artist in Atlanta's booming music industry.

209: The New South, Part I | Georgia Stories

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At the end of the 19th century, Georgia was undergoing many changes. The Coca-Cola company started up in Atlanta and through massive advertising campaigns came to be a worldwide brand. The Morton Theater provided a haven for African American performers to practice their craft before a crowd. And the tragedy of the lynching of Leo Frank shocked the city.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | The Decline of Railroads and Streetcars

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Discover how the building and use of railroads declined due to the popularity of automobiles and trucks. One effect was the development of regional and short line railroads that served smaller communities. Several larger cities used local electric streetcars until the automobiles took over.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | In Mid-continent and “The Holy Dog”

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Discover how transportation has affected every step of North Dakota history. North Dakota’s position in the center of North America has always made transportation a challenge with even the earliest peoples seeking ways to cover large distances of land. The arrival of horses to the Northern Plains had a radical effect on the Native American culture and way of life.

Piracy or Defending | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how history is in the eye of the beholder and Americans traditionally see their economic successes as progress in this video from the Steamboat on the Red series. In the case of the steamboats, however, the Chippewa people saw the Americans as rude and in violation of international law. When the Native people attempted to enforce their land rights, they were seen as pirates in the eyes of Americans.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Layover in Atlanta: The Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport | Georgia Stories

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 Flying came into vogue at the turn of the century. Asa Candler built a speedway on 300 acres of cotton fields near the village of Hapeville where popular auto races and flying shows were staged. Cities need good transportation features to prosper and Atlanta was already a railroad hub in the South. Local pilots urged that an airport be built but aviation was thought to be a fad. It was not until 1927 when the city of Atlanta bought the speedway and the federal government made Atlanta an airmail stop that the airport really took off. Through the years new terminals were built and billions were pumped in the economy.

New Cargo | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how, beginning in the late 1880s and early 1900s, the cargo transported on the steamboats changed from buffalo robes and furs to hard spring wheat, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. As a result, grain elevators were built along the banks of the river, and farmers were able to get their crops to market fairly quickly.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

People and Businesses | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how communities began to develop on the banks of the Red River along the steamboats’ route in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. With new, cheaper means of transportation come people—first workers, then settlers, then merchants. 

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

111: The Rise of Modern Georgia, Part II (Black Leadership at the Turn of the Century | Georgia Stories

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This episode discusses the rise and change of cultural status for African Americans from the Civil War through today.

Segments: Alonzo Herndon Family, Race Riot of 1906, African-American Inventors

Teachable Moment: Who is Salmon P. Chase? | Fast Forward

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Learn more about Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury from 1861 to 1864.

Henry Ford Institutes Worker Shareholders | American Experience

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Discover how Henry Ford used an increase in wages to address challenges facing his automobile company in this clip from American Experience. By more than doubling wages and creating "worker shareholders," Ford was able to both reduce assembly line turnover and create an expanded customer base for his Model T automobile. The policy played a major role in the transformation of the United States during the early 20th century from a society focused on production alone to one that emphasized both production and consumption. This resource is part of the American Experience collection.

African-American Inventors | Georgia Stories

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Chris Mitchell teaches Georgia students about African American inventors using original patents, documents, and photographs. Among African American inventors she recognizes are Garrett Morgan from Cleveland, Ohio who designed the traffic signal we see every day. Lewis Latimer proposed the use of the carbon filament for light bulbs that allowed them to burn longer. He was hired by and was the only African American in Thomas Edison’s laboratory. Frederick McKinley Jones holds 60 patents. He designed the technology that adapted silent movie projectors and allowed them to show talking movies. His invention of the refrigerated truck allows fruits and vegetables to remain fresh when they are shipped across the country.

Affordable Green Housing

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In this video, students learn and understand the importance of affordable housing to the social and cultural aspects of the community.

How Will Robots Affect Your Career Options?

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Find out how artificial intelligence could impact the future workforce with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 20, 2015.

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