Social Studies

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Richard Bresnahan: The Taste of the Clay | Glazing and Design Traditions

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This video clip explains how the eco-consciousness and farming roots of Master Potter Richard Bresnahan influence the creation of the glazes and pottery designs he chooses.

Richard Bresnahan: The Taste of the Clay | The Johanna Kiln

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Learn about the unusual naming of the kiln at Saint John's University. The unique and complex kiln used to fire the pottery is named after Sister Johanna Becker, OSB, a guiding force at Saint John's University.

Indian Pride, Health: Part 4

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 The Turtle Mountain Metis Fiddlers perform. The fiddlers are from the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota.

Indian Pride, Heroes: Part 4

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JuniKae Randall introduces Quintanya Claw of the Navajo Nation of Arizona who shares songs from a wooden flute.

 

 

Indian Pride, Economic Development: Part 5

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Joe Garcia, a member of the San Juan Pueblo of New Mexico and president of the National Congress of American Indians, sings a traditional lullaby. 

Indian Pride: Myths and Real Truths | Part 4

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JuniKae Randall introduces Lefty's Little Steppers, dance group from the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians in North Dakota, demonstrate their craft.

Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota | Flandrau State Park

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One of the most unusual designs build by Civilian Conservation Corps, is at Flandrau State Park, Minnesota.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Crosby

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A large commercial building in Crosby, used primarily as a retail store, has been renovated for use as apartments, a hotel room, coffee shop, and other business space with minimal expense.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Grand Forks

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Like many cities, Grand Forks had seen a decline in activity and economic development in its downtown area during the 1960s and 1970s which was escalated by the devastating flood of 1997. Federal assistance and local restoration projects have revitalized the area by rehabilitating the buildings that could be saved.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Revitalizing Downtowns

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Many rural communities are struggling to preserve their downtowns, their economy and their identity, which can be helped by revitalizing historical buildings.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bowman

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To help the community of Bowman survive, keep business at home, and provide jobs, the town has morphed a grocery store into the library and a lumberyard into a museum.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Minnesota Legacy Short | Paul Olson: Sculptor

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Learn about Minneapolis sculptor Paul Olson who started out in life never intending to be an artist of any kind. But once he found his passion, sculpting became a way of life. Paul regularly makes and sells installations to Twin Cities businesses. The Concordia College of Moorhead graduate let us follow his process and find out what drives him.

Richard Bresnahan: The Taste of the Clay | The Apprenticeship in Japan

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Richard Bresnahan, Master Potter, talks about his pottery apprenticeship in Japan. He explains "tsuchi-aji," which means "the taste of the clay." It is metaphor for a spiritual element of Japanese pottery making.

Richard Bresnahan: The Taste of the Clay | Sustainability and Community Involvement

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Learn how a sense of community emerges during a firing of the massive Johanna kiln.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Hillsboro

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Hear how the Hillsboro Community Partnership has led the rehabilitation of two significant buildings on the central downtown corner of Main Street and Caledonia Avenue.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”
 

 

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