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Do You Choose To Have Your Privacy Invaded By Using Tech? | PBS Idea Channel

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The recent Heartbleed bug was, for many, just another reminder that our information will never be secure on the internet. We feel vulnerable and hopeless in the face of a long string of privacy concerns, and many argue that this is an inevitable result of technology. But since our culture has wholly jumped on the digital bandwagon, do we as individuals truly choose to sacrifice our privacy? Or maybe the better question is, how much do we even choose to use technology? 

Water Pollution Investigation

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Water pollution is the contamination of water resources by harmful wastes or toxins. This type of pollution can be dangerous to animals and plant populations in and around lakes, rivers, polluted groundwater areas or oceans, and can pose major problems for humans as well. Explore the detrimental effects of plastic waste pollution on the San Francisco Bay—specifically, mercury contamination, with this resource group from QUEST.

A World Away

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Middle school students from across Maryland spend a week at Camp North Bay to build self-confidence and learn ways that they can take good risks to make a difference in our environment. Students have opportunities to discover and identify different types of wildlife in the area, ride a 500 foot long zip line, and learn meaningful lessons about positively interacting with each other and with nature.

League of Denial: Should Kids Play Tackle Football?

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Learn how children's brains are affected differently by hits to the head that routinely occur during football practice and game play in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is also featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids? Use the lesson to learn more about the hypothesis that "just playing the game" places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. For background on CTE, watch Introduction To CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

What Are Viruses? | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 3

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Explore how viruses grow and spread, starting first with a host organism. The more species a single virus can occupy, the more likely it is to last into the future. The strain of Ebola that terrorized West Africa does an especially effective job of infecting the human body.

Zika Transmission | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 6

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Zika, unlike Ebola, is less commonly spread by human-to-human contact. Instead, mosquitos are the root cause. Brazil has recently implemented mosquito controls to prevent the transmission several of viral diseases, including Zika. As the world's population grows and spreads geographically, human interaction with new wildlife opens up greater opportunity for zoonotic disease to spread.

A New Foe Emerges - Nipah | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 7

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In 1988 Southeast Asia faced it's own battle with Nipah, a fruit bat-borne disease that kills more than three quarters of those infected. Nipah is only contracted in Bangladesh between the months of December and March, and this was a puzzle at first. It turns out that it is during these months that date palm sap, a national delicacy, is collected. Fruit bats, too, drink this sap, and the sap is thus the vehicle of Nipah transmission. Jonathan Epstein monitors bats in Bangladesh in an effort to prevent Nipah from becoming a global pandemic.

How Ebola Kills | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 4

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Meet Alhassan Kemokai, an Ebola virus survivor from Sierra Leone, as he tells the story of his battle with the brutal disease. Kemokai caught Ebola while caring for his mother when she contracted the virus. For this reason, some call Ebola a disease of love: it transmits while people care for their ailing loved ones. 

Why Do We Sleep? | The Good Stuff

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In this episode, we look at how humans and animals sleep and try to figure out the science behind why we spend a third of our lives asleep. Why do we do it? How do animals like sharks and dolphins sleep? Do Animals dream?

What's the Value of a Life? | Braincraft

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How do scientists—and doctors—measure the value of a life?

The PREDICT Project | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 9

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See Jonna Mazet's innovative PREDICT Project in action. PREDICT is a worldwide effort to use animal surveillance to monitor viruses, proactively preventing and containing outbreaks of infectious disease by identitifying points of contamination early on.

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan Face Desperate Conditions | PBS Newshour

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Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan are returning to flattened communities with no food, water or sanitation, as officials struggle to provide relief. This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on November 12th, 2013.

Is Marijuana Actually Medicinal? | Above the Noise

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With the results of the 2016 election, use of medical marijuana is now approved in 28 states, plus Washington, D.C., but the plant itself is not approved as medicine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It still remains federally illegal. Under the Controlled Substances Act, the federal government classifies marijuana as a schedule I drug-- which is a category reserved for the most dangerous drugs, drugs that do not show any medical benefit. This classification makes it difficult for researchers to study, because drugs in this category are very tightly regulated. Host Myles Bess explores the research surrounding medical marijuana and discusses some of the challenges researchers face in studying it.

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

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Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.

Contact Tracing | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 5

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Find out why contact tracing is such a crucial part of controlling outbreaks of infectious disease. Tracing back to patient zero during the West African Ebola outbreak shed light on Ebola's zoonotic origins and rapid spread. Contact tracing revealed that one initial "spillover" event—contact between a Guinean child and a bat in 2015—resulted in the largest Ebola outbreak the world had ever seen.

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