Social Studies

Science (X) - Social Studies (X) - Geography (X)

Rhinoceros Release

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Due to unregulated hunting and poaching, the black rhinoceros has become an endangered species across the African continent. In an effort to preserve the remaining rhinos and repopulate the species, wildlife preserves have been created. The black rhinoceros now thrives in the South African National Park system. In order to spread the success of the South African preserve to other regions, rhinos from this sanctuary are being relocated to other preserves across the continent. In this video from Nature, learn about the factors taken into consideration to release the Black Rhino back into the wild.

A Planetary Perspective: Landsat and Google Earth Engine

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Since July 1972, NASA's Landsat satellites have gathered images over the entire land surface of the Earth, creating the most complete record ever assembled. These images, archived at United States Geological Survey, reveal dynamic changes over time due to human activity (deforestation, urbanization) and natural processes (volcanic eruptions, wildfire). Now, Google Earth Engine allows scientists, researchers and the public to easily view and analyze this treasure trove of planetary data.

Skidaway Island State Park | Fast Forward

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Despite what you see in cartoons, not all Park Rangers say "Hey, Boo Boo!" Luckily, one of ours does, as well as explain what Park Rangers really do. You'll want to meet her, along with the other rangers who help maintain this beautiful state park located just outside of Savannah. The park is a great place to get away to for a few days.

Mother Nature in Charge | Long Commutes

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Clarence Greene, roads superintendent for the Spirit Lake Reservation, has to drive great distances to get to job sites because roads are under several feet of water. He has seen many family farms flooded out, farms that have been passed from one generation to the next, leaving no legacy or livelihood for this generation.

Mother Nature in Charge | Geographical Outlets

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NDSU geology professor, Dr. Allan Ashworth discusses natural outlets for the Devils Lake basin; most notably the Sheyenne River.

Mother Nature in Charge | Lee Gessner

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Lee Gessner is a farmer near Penn, ND, who worries if the water has risen while he sleeps each night. While he is frustrated by the situation he does understand that Mother Nature is the one in charge and that he must learn to adapt to her wishes.

Mother Nature in Charge | When the Water Came

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Jeff Frith, manager of the Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board, explains how the flooding of Devils Lake began in 1993 with some areas of the basin getting nearly thirty inches of rain that year. The fall of 2008 through the spring of 2009 brought more rain and snow, causing a dramatic rise in the lake. Frith explains the amount acreage lost and the economic losses of the past year.

Battle for the Elephants: The History of the Ivory Trade

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Explore the history of the ivory trade and the resulting devastation of Africa’s elephant population—from 26 million elephants in 1800 to fewer than one million today.

Illinois Tornadoes | PBS Newshour

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An outbreak of tornadoes blasted the Midwest over the weekend, leaving at least eight people dead and leveling entire neighborhoods. The most powerful storm cut through Washington, Illinois, Sunday afternoon with winds of almost 200 miles per hour. This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on November 19th, 2013.

 

How Coral Grows

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The Andros Island Coral Reef Diorama at the American Museum of Natural History has been showcasing life below the ocean since the 1930s. This video from DIORAMA and SciTech Now takes a close look at coral polyps, the tiny animals that makes giant coral reefs. Meet dinoflagellates, algae that lives inside coral polyps. Footage from the 1920s and 1930s shows scientists and artists as they study, document, and even paint underwater in order to recreate this setting.

Analyze the environmental conditions that Coral reefs need to thrive using the Coral Distribution activity found in the Support Materials section below.

Isle de Jean Charles | Global Oneness Project

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Students watch a 9-minute film, Isle de Jean Charles by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a tiny island community off the Louisiana coast. The film explores the changes taking place on the island through the lives of two residents whose families are facing a future where rising seas, coastal erosion, and storms are threatening to wash their home away. 

In the accompanying lesson, students discuss the effects of hurricanes and the advantages and disadvantages for living near the coast. Students will participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of cultural displacement and the effects of environmental change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

An Interview with the Sami | EARTH A New Wild

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The Sami, also known as Laplanders, are people indigenous to Scandinavia. This interview with a reindeer herder showcases Sami culture, touching on they have adapted over the years to a more modern form of living. The culture places a great importance on the husbandry of reindeer, a profession now illegal for anyone other than the Sami to practice. Use this resource to introduce students to the Sami culture, specifically regarding reindeer, clothing, and their adoption of a modern way of life.

Record Snowfalls Hit Boston

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See the effects of record-breaking snowfall on Boston's communities with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 18, 2015.

Battle of the Atlantic

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The Battle of the Atlantic was the closest scene of combat to the United States during World War II. Using a magnetometer, NOAA seeks to document the final days for those on board the more than 60 merchant marine and navy warships. Using modern technology, researchers are locating and documenting the sea battle that raged off North Carolina's coast during World War II.

Earthquake Prediction

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Earthquake prediction has never been an exact science or an easy job. In 1923, the debate between two Japanese seismologists over whether or not a large earthquake was imminent and the citizens of Tokyo should be warned ended in tragedy. In this video segment adapted from NOVA, a contemporary seismologist tells the story of these two pioneers and describes the events of the infamous Kanto Earthquake.

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