Fine Arts

Fine Arts (X) - Middle (X) - Theater (X)

Otello | The Metropolitan Opera

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Shakespeare’s meditation on the downfall of a volatile hero and the poison of jealousy finds its match in Verdi’s bold, turbulent music. The opera thrusts the audience into the turbulent world of the protagonists—characters of deep heroism, unmitigated malice, idealistic love, and jealous despair—and their larger-than-life passions. Otello is the second of Verdi’s three great Shakespeare adaptations and a devastating portrayal of a man who is deceived into murdering the woman he loves.

A Raisin in the Sun Revisited: Chapter 8

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The ending of A Raisin in the Sun Revisited takes stock of how these three plays, A Raisin in The SunClybourne Park, and Beneatha’s Place, by their mere creation and popularity, show that the topic of race in America is still a relevant and unresolved issue and one that audiences are eager to continue discussing. The actors talk about what they’ve learned and felt through portraying these characters. Kwame Kwei-Armah muses on producing the two plays: “It was bold, people responded to it positively…as an artist I’m here to explore, to try to be as exciting as possible, win or lose, that’s what art is here to do.” 

Greek Theater: Oedipus Rex

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This is a reader’s theater performance of a scene from Oedipus Rex, generally regarded as the masterpiece work of the Greek tragedian Sophocles (circa 497-406 BCE). In this scene, Oedipus argues with Teiresias about Laius’ murder. In a reader’s theater format, the actors read from the scripts wearing everyday clothes and seated on a stage in limbo or with a minimal set.

Neo-Classicism: Tartuffe Scene 2

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Tartuffe is an example of satire. This segment shows two scenes, performed in reader’s theater style, from this 1664 play by Moliere. Moliere (1622-1673) was a premier playwright of satire and comedy. In the first scene, Mariane and Dorine discuss Mariane’s upcoming marriage to Tartuffe, a dishonest and conniving man who has been befriended by Mariane’s father Orgon. In the second scene, Cleante, Orgon’s brother-in-law enters the action. After Orgon has kicked his son Damis out of their house because he disagrees with Mariane’s marriage to Tartuffe, Cleante confronts Tartuffe.

Realism: A Doll's House

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This reader’s theater performance presents a scene from A Doll’s House, written in 1879. The play, by Henrik Ibsen, is a scathing criticism of the traditional roles of men and women in Victorian marriage. The main character is a woman named Nora. Just before the scene opens, a former employee of her husband, Torvald Helmer, has threatened to blackmail Nora. The blackmail attempt stems from Krogstad’s knowledge that Nora forged a loan application to pay for a trip. In the scene, Torvald affectionately treats Nora like a plaything, and their home is “a doll’s house.” It is clear that he does not understand why Nora is nervous and preoccupied. It is also clear that Nora sees why she cannot tell Torvald about her predicament. By the play’s end, Torvald has learned Nora’s secret. Although he forgives her, Nora realizes that he is not the noble creature she has supposed him to be.

State of Contemporary American Theater: The Importance of Regional Theater

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This segment profiles the New American Play Festival at Actors Theater of Louisville. The theater’s staff, directors, and actors talk about the importance of regional theater.

Words Like Freedom

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This segment includes performances of works by three African-American women writers: “Ain’t I a Woman?” by 19th century abolitionist and feminist Sojourner Truth; “Alabama Centennial,” a poem about the civil rights movement of the 1960s by Naomi Long Madgett; and Nikki Giovanni’s popular self-love poem, “Ego Tripping.”

Dhana Bradley Donaldson and Priscilla Hancock Cooper, cofounders of the former Theatre Workshop of Louisville, present a “poetic concert” featuring the words of African-American writers. Their performances focus on the significant role of African-American women in the struggle for racial justice and opens with Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech.

Career Connections | Senior Vice President of Theatre Operations

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Gina Vernaci started as a temporary assistant in Cleveland’s Playhouse Square. Today, she’s the Senior VP of Theatre Operations - Playhouse Square is the second largest theatre district in the country. Hear her fascinating story.

Joan Jonas: Reflecting on Performance | Art in the 21st Century "Fiction"

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore the relationship between performance and video art with artist Joan Jonas. In this clip, Jonas explains the process behind her performance installations, which have been enjoyed by audiences for decades. Watch Jonas' performance piece using mirrors, and explore the relationship between mythic story and modernity her work. The artist also talks about her use of masks and her interest in the concept of identity, as well as how she has used videos to augment live performances.

Pink Morton | Georgia Stories

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The importance of buildings to communties can vary wildly, but there is one building in Georgia that has had a huge impact on the African American artist community. Monroe Bowers Morton was known as "Pink" for his light skin (he was the son of a former slave mother and white father). He built the Morton Theater in 1910. Morton served as a postmaster, published two newspapers, and owned 30 buildings. The center of his empire was the Morton Building, which became the center of African-American business and entertainment in Athens at the turn of the century.

Steve Martin Celebrates Tina Fey | Mark Twain Prize

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Steve Martin discusses Tina Fey's comedic genius at the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

Use this resource with the accomanying lesson plan to discuss the role of rhetoric in presentations and ceremonies, as well as the use of irony and humor in delivering a successful speech.

The Hiroshima Children’s Peace Memorial | A World of Stories

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Megan Hicks incorporates origami with storytelling to tell the true story behind the Children’s Peace Memorial in Hiroshima, Japan.

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories collection.

The Merchant of Venice: Evaluating Values | Shakespeare in the Schools

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In Shakespeare's The Merchant of VeniceShylock contemplates various values: financial, familial, and universal after the loss of his daughter and money.

Teaching the Holocaust Through Art: Social Justice | Murals of the Holocaust

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Louisville drama teacher Kim Joiner of Noe Middle School incorporates the arts into Holocaust history lessons. In this video, she explains how she facilitates discussions of social justice and connects study of the Holocaust to the drama classroom. She asks students to consider a central question: When do you stand up to authority instead of obeying it? Joiner explains why teachers should not be afraid to teach the Holocaust.

Teaching the Holocaust Through Art: Interpretation | Murals of the Holocaust

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Kim Joiner describes how she prepares her students for a field trip to Louisville’s Jewish Community Center to view an exhibit of student-created murals about the Holocaust. She describes art interpretation and drawing lessons, and explains how she incorporates the performing arts in ways that focus on the emotion of the event and remain respectful of the lives lost. She describes how she guides the students to create their own art in response to the murals and reflect on their meaning.

Pages