Social Studies

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City OKs Radical Plan to Keep Families in Their Homes

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Help students understand the concept of eminent domain with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials from September 20th, 2013. 

Government Shutdown Continues and Tensions Between Parties Remain High

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on October 7, 2013.

It is day seven of the government shutdown: thousands of government employees have been ordered to stay home without pay, national parks remain closed and tensions between Democrats and Repulicans have reached a new high.

Shift in U.S. Policy Opens Cuba to American Tourists

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Find out why many people anticipate increased tourism in Cuba with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 15, 2015.

How U.S. Laws on Maternity Leave Impact New Parents

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Learn how maternity leave in the U.S. compares to other countries with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 22, 2015.

Titans of Idaho Industry: Harry Magnuson | Idaho Experience

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The town of Wallace has seen it all—and survived. But its biggest threat came in the 1970s. We’ll look at how Harry Magnuson fought to save Wallace. It’s a powerful tale of surprising heroes and deep love of one’s hometown.

Please refer to the accompanying Facilitator Guide (found in the Support Materials section) for the Idaho Content Standards associated with this resource.

Hot Shots & Hot Jobs: Urban Design and Neighborhoods of the Future

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We don’t give much thought to our daily commute—the routes we take to get to school or to our jobs. Those same networks of roads and sidewalks we take for granted every day, plus the parks and plazas we pass by, are planned by urban designers.

Urban designers are in charge of arranging city structures: they design plazas and parks, groups of buildings, and the roads and sidewalks that connect them all. They help make cities accessible, efficient, and visually pleasing for the people who live there. “There’s nothing cooler than seeing people using the walkways and passing the city features that you helped to design,” says Ashley Montgomery, an architecture student at Hampton University.

Video produced by Lisa Sadler, Virginia Sea Grant Science Multimedia Intern.

Hot Shots & Hot Jobs: Software Engineers Create Solutions through Code

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Just about everything you can do on a computer—checking your email, posting to Facebook, online banking and shopping—is powered by software. The people who come up with that software, and keep it working efficiently, are behind the scenes of a big portion of our lives.

Hot Shots & Hot Jobs: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Go Soaring for a Bird’s Eye View

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In just a few short years, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, sometimes called drones) has risen dramatically. You may know someone who flies one as a hobby, and you’ve certainly seen the breathtaking bird’s-eye footage they can produce for movies and television. But these agile little planes can do a lot more than make cool movies. Since their human pilots are safely on the ground, UAVs are light and nimble enough to move freely around an area without the usual dangers of flight.

They can be deployed for a variety of practical purposes: monitoring crops, checking on oil pipelines, even helping to fight wildfires. Their ability to see a large area from a safe distance makes them useful in military operations, border security and disaster relief. They can even fly into the eye of a hurricane to study its strength and progress.

Hot Shots & Hot Jobs: Powering Up with Renewable Energy

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Most of us don’t realize how dependent we are on electricity until a storm or accident suddenly takes it out. Our work, our entertainment, the comfort of our homes, even the safety of our food all depend on a steady flow of electrical power. But providing that power can take a heavy toll on the environment. In recent years, that has led to increased interest in renewable energy, which focuses on making the process more efficient and minimizing its effect on the environment. It’s a big responsibility, and doing it well requires all kinds of people with different skills and talents. Let’s meet three Dominion Energy employees who are doing very different jobs to bring power safely to our communities.

Hot Shots & Hot Jobs: Pilots Enjoy Breathtaking Views and Plentiful Job Options

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The possibilities for trained pilots are varied—from piloting huge passenger jets across the ocean to guiding small aircraft for police, fire and medical operations—and the job prospects are higher now than ever.

“Airlines are experiencing a shortage of pilots because most of the baby boomers are starting to retire,” says Gabrielle DiSanza, a flight instructor at Liberty University. “So right now there is a desperate need for pilots in the regionals, in the majors, all over aviation."

State Budgets | Peach State Politics

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In this episode of Peach State Politics, host Stephen Fowler explains how Georgia's state budget works, where the money goes, and how the money is spent.

How Much is Too Much? | American Graduate

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“Our students are not widgets!” 

Certainly that is the sentiment of educators who see business involvement in schools as “putting in orders” for workers. Yet that refrain might be less common in an era when the whole notion of career and technical education is evolving way beyond shop class. 

Maybe that’s because each side understands its boundaries. Businesspeople and educators both say the same thing: Industry lays out the workforce needs; schools develop the curriculum. 

The video above, the final one in our opening series for American Graduate: Getting to Work, includes voices from a major regional employer as well as from K-12 and higher education.

Should We Get Free Money from the Government? | Above the Noise

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When the robots come to take our jobs, what are we all going to do to keep a roof over our heads and food on the table? That’s the question that the universal basic income (UBI) hopes to answer. The government gives everyone JUST enough money to afford the basics so that no one falls into total, abject poverty. Supporters think a universal income is essential to fight financial inequality and help the millions of people who could lose their jobs to artificial intelligence. But opponents think it would be WAY too expensive and could hurt the economy by stripping away the incentive to work. Where do you stand? Is the universal basic income a good idea or bad idea? Have your students join the discussion with other students across the country on KQED Learn. (Log in required.)

Should Colleges Still Require the SATs and ACTs? | Above the Noise

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Taking the SAT or ACT is a right of passage for high school students applying to college. Millions of juniors and seniors take at least one of the tests every year, albeit reluctantly, and most colleges still require it to be considered for admission. But a growing number of colleges are putting much less emphasis on test scores. Many have made the test entirely optional. Should tests like the ACT or SAT still be used for college admissions? Find out in the latest Above the Noise episode. And join the discussion about standardized testing with other students on KQED Learn by going to Activity in Support Materials. (Log in required.)

What’s It like to Go to School in a One-Room Schoolhouse? | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the summary, watch the videos and answer the discussion located under support materials. You may want to read along with the transcript.

Summary: The one-room schoolhouse may seem like a distant memory from US history, but about 200 of them still exist today, including tiny Valley Elementary School in Cody, Wyoming. It has only six students, but in Wyoming, education funding is redistributed so that students can have access to similar resources, no matter how small or remote their location. Mason Baum of Student Reporting Labs has the story.

May 31, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

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