Science

Science (X) - Geography (X)

Why Only 9 Countries Have Nuclear Weapons | Above the Noise

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North Korea has been making headlines recently, mostly due to its nuclear weapons. In early January, the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un, boasted of his ability to reach the U.S. with nuclear-armed missiles. Then in March -- in an apparent 180 -- he told South Korean officials that he would be willing to negotiate with the U.S. to completely denuclearize. What are the rules that govern who has nukes and who doesn’t? And why do some countries maintain huge nuclear arsenals, while many other countries don’t have any nukes? Joe Hanson of It's OK to Be Smart joins host Myles Bess to investigate.

Avalanche Town

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In 1995, an avalanche overran an unsuspecting fishing village in Iceland, killing 20 of its residents. Although avalanches are a common occurrence in the region, this was the first avalanche in this village's history to travel as far as the city center. In this video segment adapted from NOVA, learn more about the Iceland avalanche and how engineers plan to protect the village from future avalanches.

Oil Spill: Exxon Valdez, 1989

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Coastlines serve as both physical and biological frontiers between land and sea. They are highly vulnerable to pollution from contaminated rivers as well as from urban waste and industrial products that are discharged at sea and wash up on shore. This video segment adapted from NOVA features one of the largest oil spills in history: the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound, the costliest industrial accident to date.

Waste Deep

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Enhance your health, science, and environmental studies curriculum with this video which features a landfill in South Jersey and examines the state of food waste in America today. Then, use the accompanying lesson plan, "Making Mountains Out of Landfills: Telling a Visual Story of Waste," to prepare students to visually track and document different kinds of trash in their community.

 

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Clean Water Systems in Mexico

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In this video segment adapted from Rx for Survival, learn about the importance of clean water and sanitation systems. Hear the story of how, in the early 1990s, Mexico's entry into a North American trade agreement was threatened by a cholera epidemic. Find out how the Mexican government rebuilt the water and sanitation system to stop the spread of the disease and how the investment in clean water helped the country win the trade agreement.

Bridging Culture, Community and Science

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CREST models an interdisciplinary approach to connecting students to their threatened communities, using technology as a tool and place-based education as a vehicle. By engaging in local projects based in the surrounding Gulf of Maine ecosystem, students learn to apply science and technology skills to support their community’s natural, social, and economic resources.

London: The Price of Traffic

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Learn how London's mayor has instituted policies that respond to the city’s growth while improving its livability and sustainability.

From the Ground to the Cloud: Transforming Chimpanzee Conservation with High-Tech Tools

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Watch how the Jane Goodall Institute uses mapping technology on mobile devices for forest monitoring and chimpanzee conservation.

Obama Vetoes Keystone Pipeline Expansion

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Go inside the debate over the Keystone Pipeline expansion with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 24, 2015.

Collecting Data Below the Earth's Surface

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Underwater surfaces and subsurfaces are mapped for environmental and commercial reasons, including marine and coastal resource management, navigational charting, and oil and gas exploration. In this video segment adapted from Discovering Women, geologists employ special acoustic devices to learn what lies beneath the water...and deeper still. They hope to use the specialized maps they create to learn more about what is driving the western part of the North American plate to split apart.

Teen Maps Contaminants from a Coal Plant

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Meet Marisol, a high school student from Little Village in Chicago in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute. Hear about how she volunteered within her community and found out about the toxins produced by the local coal-burning power plant. Learn about some of the health risks associated with such pollution, and observe how she helped create OurMap of Environmental Justice, an interactive online map that includes videos, facts, and descriptions of toxic pollutants in the community.

Growing Energy

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Discover how Brazil's innovative fuel usage provides an argument for alternative fuels.

Teachable Moment: Climate | Fast Forward

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What makes Georgia so suitable to blueberries? Part of the answer lies in the fact that our geographical location allows for two blueberry crops each season.

The Combustion of Wood

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What happens when wood burns? Learn about the chemistry of combustion, as well as the different types of combustion, including the types that are harmful to human health. 

The new e-book, Engineering is Saving the World with Cookstoves, tells the story of the need for a new design for cookstoves in Darfur and how researchers have worked to make that happen. Videos, animations, and interactive graphics explain the design process, and provide a deep dive into science concepts, like combustion. This video is part of the e-book.

Faces of America | Migration Sensations

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This video segment from Faces of America follows the routes of human migration through the haplogroups. We learn that all humans have their origins in East Africa. Over time they migrated from Asia to Europe and later to North and South America. Historian Henry Louis Gates, Jr. examines the haplogroups of Elizabeth Alexander, Kristi Yamaguchi and Meryl Streep.

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