Health/Phys. Ed.

ELA (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X)

Are the Titans from Attack on Titan Evil? | PBS Idea Channel

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The titans, from the anime series "Attack on Titan," are most definitely the bad guys. But can we call them evil? If you're unfamiliar, the titans are huge beings that devour humans, but their motivation is a little unclear. Is it just hunger? Do they hate humans? Are they just dumb? And with all this doubt, what's the use in the label of evil anyway? Nietzsche, Kant, and Jung all weigh in, but you should probably watch the episode and find out! Tell us what you think!

Pre-Production Research | Video Production: Behind the Scenes with the Pros

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KET administrative assistant and writer Anna Gordon talks about researching in pre-production for News Quiz.

Scientists Develop Ebola-fighting Robots

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Dive into the technology scientists are developing to fight viruses with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 26, 2015.

How Lead Went from Household Staple to Dangerous Toxin | PBS NewsHour

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Learn why lead exposure is still a concern throughout the country with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 12, 2016.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

How Does a Computer Diagnose Cancer?

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Discover how strides in artificial intelligence assist doctors with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 12, 2015.

How Do Different Social Media Platforms Affect Your Mood? | Above the Noise

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Do a quick Google search on how social media affects your mood, and the results make it seem like all the social media platforms will plunge you into depression. Facebook shows everyone’s perfect life and exotic vacations. Expertly curated selfies abound on Instagram. But, if you look at the actual research, the results aren’t that simple. In this Above the Noise video, host Myles Bess breaks down the science and cuts through the hype about the link between depression and social media use, and looks at how different social media platforms may affect your brain in different ways.

The Rise of Social Networking

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In this video segment from FRONTLINE: "Digital Nation," teens talk about why they use social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook.

Modifying Cell Genes Could Help Beat Blood Cancer

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Discover how an experimental treatment could help leukemia patients with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 17, 2015.

Doctors Need Cheaper, Faster Ways to Detect Ebola Virus

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See what is being done to update diagnostic tests used in the fight against Ebola with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 5, 2015.

Why Do Our Brains Love Fake News? | Above the Noise

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Ever have an argument with someone, and no matter how many facts you provide, you just can’t get that person to see it your way? One big reason for this is cognitive bias, which is a limitation in our thinking that can cause flaws in our judgement. Confirmation bias is a specific type of cognitive bias that motivates us to seek out information we already believe and ignore or minimize facts that threaten what we believe. Studies show that when people are presented with facts that contradict what they believe, the parts of the brain that control reason and rationality go inactive. But, the parts of the brain that process emotion light up like the Fourth of July. In this video, host Myles Bess dives into the research and offers some tips to combat confirmation bias. This resource is part of the News and Media Literacy Collection.

Are You A Hipster? | PBS Idea Channel

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Hipsters aren't the most likeable people, right? They seem so smug and arrogant, with their ray bans, scarves, and ironic t-shirts. Even those who clearly are hipsters still recoil at the label. Embracing irony over earnestness, the key to hipsters is not just what they enjoy, but how they enjoy it. Borrowing from other subcultures, hipsters reappropriate these fashion elements as their own. But don't we all do that? Our own fashion came from somewhere and certainly has been refined. Do we all have a little bit of hipster blood in us? Watch the episode and tell us what you think!

Are There Internet Dialects? | PBS Idea Channel

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We consider ourselves natives of Internetland, which has made us wonder if there's such a thing as an internet dialect. Is there a common way of communicating through word choice, vocabulary, and how these words are arranged and used? So what is Standard Internet Speak? Acronyms, emoticons, and hashtags? Purposeful misspellings and abbreviations? 

Animal Fitness

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Engage your Kindergarten through 5th grade students this activity that combines motor and listening skills. Using commonly known animals such as a fox, dog and an inchworm, students enjoy learning about the movements of various animals. The teacher demonstrates how to move and be like that animal using various exercises and students follow along. Students are able to showcase their psychomotor skills in this lesson.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

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In this Kindergarten through 2nd grade video, students listen carefully as their teacher reads the story “The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything” by Linda Williams. Students listen for key verbs such as clomp and wiggle throughout the story and as they hear them, they will perform a specific physical movement such as stomping their feet or wiggling their fingers. This is great for focusing on psychomotor and cognitive skills.

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