Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Professional (X) - World History (X)

Time for School | Benin: Nanavi

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In this media gallery from Time for School, meet Nanavi, a girl who lives in a remote village in Benin, West Africa. Typically, girls her age would be initiated into the traditional voodoo cult and readied for marriage. However, Nanavi has been selected to take a different path in her life. She has been recruited to attend school as part of a nationwide effort to educate the girls of Benin. As a country, Benin has one of the worst literacy rates and biggest educational gender gaps in the world. Check out the entire collection of resources from the documentary "Time For School" here.

J. Alden Loring

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Loring, a naturalist, mammologist and author, had worked for U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, the Smithsonian Institute, and the Bureau of Biological Survey. In 1909 he embarked on an expedition to Africa with President Theodore Roosevelt to collect specimens for a new Natural History Museum.

Alexander Graham Bell | Scientist, Inventor, and Teacher Video

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Alexander Graham Bell devoted his life to helping people—deaf and hearing—communicate. Working tirelessly to integrate the deaf into society—like his pupil Helen Keller—Bell was also an avid inventor. He created numerous communication devices, including the telephone. Using a short video and two primary sources, students will learn about Bell’s inventions and his work with the deaf community.

View the Lesson Plan.

Time for School | Afghanistan: Shugufa

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One of the many causalities of the three decades of conflict in Afghanistan was the Afghani educational system. In rebuilding the system, much effort has been put into overcoming the cultural barriers preventing the education of girls. In this media gallery from the documentary "Time for School", meet Shugufa and follow her over 12 years as she struggles to get an education amidst the turmoil of war-torn Afghanistan. Check out the entire collection of resources from the documentary "Time For School" here.

Booker T. Washington | Orator, Teacher, and Advisor Video

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Freed from the bonds of slavery by the Emancipation Proclamation, Booker T. Washington worked relentlessly to become a teacher, an accomplished orator, and an advisor to two Presidents. He was considered a hero in the late 1800s, although some opposed his philosophy that equality and respect must be patiently earned. Through two primary source activities and watching a short video, students will learn about Booker T. Washington’s commitment to African American education, and assess his ideas about how to achieve equality for African Americans in the years after the Civil War.

View the full Lesson Plan

Examining Chamizal National Memorial

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Examining Chamizal National Monument

Brattonsville: Choosing Sides | The Southern Campaign

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After the crushing defeat at Waxhaws, the people of the South Carolina backcountry had a decision to make.  Were they “Tories”—loyal to the crown; or would they become “Whigs” or “partisans” and fight the British invaders? 

General Thomas Sumter gathered militia troops in South Carolina. Militia units consisted of “civilian” farmers and sometimes included Catawba Indians and slaves. The American militia and partisans couldn’t just line up and take on the British. The British forces were too well-trained and disciplined. The Americans had to whittle away at the enemy, strike their supply lines—fight dozens of little battles, rather than one big battle. This strategy became known as “guerrilla warfare.”

In June 1780, the British had established an "outpost" at Rocky Mount, in the Catawba Valley. Lieutenant Colonel George Turnbull sent troops into what are now York and Chester counties to round up and eliminate the rebels. Captain Christian Huck, a loyalist from Philadelphia, was the leader.

In the community of Brattonsville, Martha Bratton sent a message to warn her husband, Colonel William Bratton, that Captain Huck was on his way. The message was delivered by Watt, the family’s African-American slave.

On July 12, 1780, the Patriot militia, led by Colonel Bratton, defeated the British Legion. This battle became known as the "Battle at Williamson's Plantation" or "Huck's Defeat."

Musgrove Mill: Ray of Hope | The Southern Campaign

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August 19th 1780, three days after the Battle of Camden, another battle was fought. British Provincials from Ninety-Six were camped near Edward Musgrove’s grist mill on the Enoree River (Laurens County), with many recuperating from wounds received at the Battle of Cedar Springs.

Funding and support for the production is provided by The National Park Service, The Self Family Foundation, The George Washington Endowment Fund of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, The South Carolina State Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and a contribution from Dr. Charles B. Hanna.

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