Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Economics (X) - Economic Growth (X)

Red River Divide | Recreation

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The Red River of the North provided for commercial endeavors with the people and freight carried by steamboats earlier in its history and for commercial fisherman. Swimming in the river was once common, as were sleigh riding and skating on the ice in the winter. In more recent years, recreational fishing and boating have become more popular.

Parsing gross domestic product

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This video provides understanding of what the gross domestic product (GDP) does and doesn't measure by using specific examples.

Circular Flow of Income and Expenditures

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A link to a video which represents the flow of resources in a simple economy in which one individual sets up a firm.

Boomtowns Spur Economic Growth in Mexico

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Keep your kids in the loop on how Mexico’s reputation is changing for the better, thanks to new economic investments, with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resources from April 7, 2014. Mexico is now the third biggest trading partner of the United States, but with poverty afflicting half of the country's 120 million people, the country faces an uphill battle toward future prosperity.

Experiment Highlights Effects of Poor Neighborhoods

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Hear about the factors that contribute to upward mobility with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 1, 2015.

Race Riot of 1906 | Georgia Stories

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How can we avoid repeating our past mistakes? One of the best ways is to understand what happened and why it happened so we can avoid doing the same thing in the future. One such event in Georgia's past was the race riot of 1906. As economic conditions worsened after the Civil War, poor whites joined blacks moving to Atlanta where both groups competed for work. In mid-September, a riot started in Atlanta when violent mobs of whites began randomly attacking black men, beating and killing them.

Child Labor and the Textile Mills | Georgia Stories

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Today there are laws that regulate how many hours children can work and at what age they can begin to work. That was not always the case. In the early 1900s there were no Georgia laws prohibiting child labor, a situation that coincided with the rise of the textile industry. Professor John Lupold of Columbus College describes how poor Georgians abandoned their farms and moved to cities to find work. Times were so hard that everyone in the family worked. 

219: Modern Georgia, Part VII | Georgia Stories

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Modern Georgia is constantly finding ways to improve the way of life of its citizens. For some, that means homes built by Habitat for Humanity, which was started in Georgia. For others, it means developing recycling programs to ensure the continued health of the state. It could even mean starting a farm to provide ostrich and emu meat.

Technology & Innovation | Segment 1

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In 1931, Watson laid out expansion plans that included a research center and training/sales school. This marked one of his greatest contributions to the growth of IBM and the information technology industry.

Southern Africa: Troubled Water

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In 2005, FRONTLINE/World featured the PlayPump, a promising new technology that pumped fresh water when children played on a merry-go-round. The story appealed to the good intentions of politicians, celebrities and funders, who gave support to installing thousands of these devices in Africa.

Now, in Troubled Water, reporter Amy Costello continues her investigation into what happened to those communities as the promise of the PlayPump fell short, villages were left with non-working PlayPumps for months, and the device’s biggest American boosters began to back away from a technology they had once championed.

 

Trail Town | Appalachian Innovators

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Examine how community members of West Eaton, PA and other towns along the Great Allegheny Passage are expanding upon existing resources such as railroads, hiking trails, and bike paths to increase economic development in their areas.

the.dollar: iPhone Launch

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Follow the.News correspondent Stacy Delikat as she reports on the hype, impact and possible outcomes of the the iphone prior to its release. Learn how Apple's stock and the public perception of the company can play a role in the market economy.

How Much is Too Much? | American Graduate

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“Our students are not widgets!” 

Certainly that is the sentiment of educators who see business involvement in schools as “putting in orders” for workers. Yet that refrain might be less common in an era when the whole notion of career and technical education is evolving way beyond shop class. 

Maybe that’s because each side understands its boundaries. Businesspeople and educators both say the same thing: Industry lays out the workforce needs; schools develop the curriculum. 

The video above, the final one in our opening series for American Graduate: Getting to Work, includes voices from a major regional employer as well as from K-12 and higher education.

Quick Ways to Good Money | American Graduate

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What would you say to making $18 per hour after less than half a year of post-secondary training? Or $35 an hour in a union job? Those aren’t hypotheticals. Workforce experts say those jobs exist in the Kansas City area, and workers are in demand. One of the biggest hurdles in matching people with those positions, observers said, is overcoming the stigma that has developed around blue collar professions like manufacturing and construction. 

How is it that such good jobs can have such a bad reputation?

Workforce Challenges in KC and Beyond: Videos | American Graduate

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This collection of videos accompanies the Workforce Challenges in KC and Beyond lesson plan featuring KCPT's American Graduate: Getting to Work series.

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