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Dodging Bullets | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 8

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The highly contagious and pandemic nature of Ebola was exposed in 2014, when an infected US diplomat flew from Liberia to Nigeria, exposing dozens of passerby and doctors along the way. Contact tracing and quarantine can contain an outbreak, but not before lives are lost in the course of getting these procedures in place. An army of contact tracers in Lagos sprung into action and prevented the outbreak from becoming a global catastophe.

Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond | Full Program

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Over the last few decades, diseases that spill over from animals to humans have been on the rise. Learn what's behind the increase, and what we can do to fight these dangerous diseases. Join scientists as they investigate the rise of spillover viruses like Zika, Ebola, and Nipah, and see what scientists are doing to anticipate and prevent epidemics around the world.

Ebola Invades | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 2

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Learn about Ebola, a virus was first recognized in Zaire in 1976, transmitted by person-to-person contact and causing isolated outbreaks. An unexpected and large outbreak occurred in 2014 in West Africa, a region that had not experienced the disease before.

Introduction to an Epidemic | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 1

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Learn about Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that hit Brazil in 2015. Over the last few decades, diseases that spill over from animals to humans have been on the rise. Soon after the onset of Zika, epidemiologists noticed an uptick in the number of babies born with microcephaly, a severe birth defect affecting the head. Were the two related? See how epidemiologists studied the unfolding outbreak to determine Zika's origins, and also to determine if the virus was responsible for the babies born with microcephaly.

League of Denial: What Causes CTE?

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Learn about one scientist’s hypothesis that “just playing the game” places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids. Use the lesson to learn more about how children's brains are impacted differently and to write down your responses to evidence that football may be unsafe for young children. For background on CTE, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: Introduction to CTE

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Learn how the 2002 death of one of football’s greatest linemen helped bring to light a rare disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. In 1991, "Iron Mike" Webster retired after 17 years in football and thousands of hits to his helmet. Soon after, he and his family suspected that playing football had taken a devastating toll on his brain. After Webster died, pathologist Bennet Omalu examined Webster’s brain tissue. His findings suggested that repetitive brain trauma causes an abnormal protein ("tau") to accumulate in the brain. This was the first evidence that playing football could cause a progressive neurodegenerative disease that results in permanent brain damage. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial Update | NFL Player Quits over Concussion Concerns

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Learn about NFL player Chris Borland, who retired after just one season due to his concern about concussions, and why his decision prompted one media outlet to call him “the most dangerous man in football,” in this video from FRONTLINE. Borland left professional football, the game he loved since childhood, after reading about the effects of repeated head contact on the brain and speaking with a leading brain scientist. In response to the young star’s headline-making retirement decision, NFL commissioner Goodell stated the game was safer than ever. Estimates from actuaries hired by the NFL state that three out of ten NFL players will have brain damage in their lifetimes. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Download teacher support materials for this resource:  Teaching Tips  |  Video Transcript

Disease! | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about disease and the effects that disease has had on human history. Disease has been with man since the beginning, and it has shaped the way humans operate in a lot of ways. John will teach you about the Black Death, the Great Dying, and the modern medical revolution that has changed the world.

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