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Health/Phys. Ed.

Science (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X)

Blood, Part 2: There Will Be Blood | Crash Course A&P 30

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We'll start by explaining the structure and function of your erythrocytes, and of hemoglobin, which they use to carry oxygen. We'll follow the formation and life cycle of a red blood cell, including how their levels are regulated by EPO and their signaling molecules. We'll wrap up by looking at how blood doping works and how it is truly a recipe for disaster.

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Endocrine System, Part 2: Hormone Cascades | Crash Course A&P 24

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In the second half of our look at the endocrine system, we discuss chemical homeostasis and hormone cascades. Specifically, we look at the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, or HPT axis, and all the ways your body can suffer when that system, or your hormones in general, get out of whack.

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The Heart, Part 2: Heart Throbs | Crash Course A&P 26

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In this episode, we talk about the heart and heart throbs-both literal and those of the televised variety. We learn how your heart's pacemaker cells use leaky membranes to generate their own action potentials, and how the resulting electricity travels through the cardiac conduction pathway from SA Node to Purkinje fibers, allowing your heart to contract. We also learn how defibrillators work to reset the rhythm of your heart.

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Autonomic Nervous System | Crash Course A&P 13

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Take a tour of the two–part autonomic nervous system. This episode explains how your sympathetic nervous system and parasympathetic nervous system work together as foils, balancing each other out. Their key anatomical differences–where nerve fibers originate and where their ganglia are located–drive their distinct anatomical functions, making your sympathetic nervous system the "fight or flight" while your parasympathetic nervous system is for "resting and digesting."

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Sympathetic Nervous System | Crash Course A&P 14

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Host Hank Green tries not to stress you out too much as he delves into the functions and terminology of your sympathetic nervous system.

What Cats Taught Us About Perception | BrainCraft

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Can you see what I see? In this episode, we look at how the visual experiences we have in life affect our perception of objects.

League of Denial Update | NFL Player Quits over Concussion Concerns

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Learn about NFL player Chris Borland, who retired after just one season due to his concern about concussions, and why his decision prompted one media outlet to call him “the most dangerous man in football,” in this video from FRONTLINE. Borland left professional football, the game he loved since childhood, after reading about the effects of repeated head contact on the brain and speaking with a leading brain scientist. In response to the young star’s headline-making retirement decision, NFL commissioner Goodell stated the game was safer than ever. Estimates from actuaries hired by the NFL state that three out of ten NFL players will have brain damage in their lifetimes. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Download teacher support materials for this resource:  Teaching Tips  |  Video Transcript

NOVA scienceNOW: Can We Slow Aging?

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This video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW examines how a gene called FOXO affects life span. Researcher Cynthia Kenyon at the University of California, San Francisco, increased the activity of a single FOXO gene in the microscopic worm C. elegans and doubled the worm's life span. FOXO regulates about 100 other genes that protect an organism's cells and tissues. Researchers Bradley Willcox and Timothy Donlon found that FOXO performs a similar role in humans. People who possess a single copy of the protective version of the gene are twice as likely to live to the age of 100, while those with two copies have triple the chance.

Disease! | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about disease and the effects that disease has had on human history. Disease has been with man since the beginning, and it has shaped the way humans operate in a lot of ways. John will teach you about the Black Death, the Great Dying, and the modern medical revolution that has changed the world.

Light Up Your Life in a Better Lit Office | Inside Science

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Your work environment can make a big difference in your well-being.

 

What Is A Fact? | BrainCraft

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In this episode, we discuss the thought experiment known as the "Knowledge Argument," which seeks to demonstrate that our conscious experience is made up of non-physical things, and the "Mind-Body Problem," where philosophy and neuroscience meet. Is our physical nature our complete nature? Can some facts be subjective, and if so, are they still facts?

Can You Solve This Dilemma? Featuring Vsauce3! | BrainCraft

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In this episode, we discuss the classic thought experiment known as "the trolley problem," which explores a person's response to ethical dilemmas.

 

Should the First Mars Mission Be All Women? | PBS Space Time

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Okay, going to Mars is going to be expensive. Not only that, but who we choose to pick to go on that trip also need to have the statistically lowest chance of… perishing. So it might be the case that our best scenario is all female crew!

Could NASA Start the Zombie Apocalypse? | PBS Space Time

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We're just as fascinated as the rest of you with predicting how the ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE will start. One surprisingly real scenario is that it could start in SPACE! Especially given the crazy effects space has on bacteria and viruses, and the difficulty of sterilization.

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