Fine Arts

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X)

The Power of Popular Songs | The Great War

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Listen to the way songs helped spread the news and influence opinion before the United States entered World War I, in this video adapted from The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Through recordings and sheet music, the words to popular songs written in Manhattan’s “Tin Pan Alley” served as both entertainment and a news source at a time when many people didn’t read newspapers or couldn’t read English. This resource is a part of The Great War: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE | Collection.

Anthems of the Counter-Culture | ​Ken Burns & ​Lynn Novick: The Vietnam War

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The late sixties were a kind of confluence of several rivulets. The anthems for that counterculture were provided by the most brilliant rock and roll music that you can imagine.

The Beaches of Agnes: Plan a Video Self Portrait

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Agnes Varda recalls her youth as she sails down the Seine in a small boat.

Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars: Music as Social Protest

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In this clip, the Sierra Leone Refugee All Stars perform the song Weapon Conflict at the Sembakounya Refugee Camp in the Republic of Guinea.

Background

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In this clip from Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World, learn some historical background and context to the development of Islamic culture, art and architecture. During the 7th century, the tribes of Arabia began one of history's greatest revolutions in power, religion, culture and wealth, united under the new faith of Islam. Consider how the artwork that emerged from the spread of these diverse civilizations represents and reflects the people and context in which it was produced.

MN Original | The Telling Project - Theater

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The Telling Project, a performing arts non-profit, uses theater to help deepen understanding of veterans’ experiences. Racheal Robinson is a wife, mother and Staff Sergeant currently serving in the Minnesota Air National Guard. With The Telling Project team Racheal delves into her story of service and, along with five other veterans, step on The Guthrie Theater stage to tell their stories in their own words.

 

For more MN Original resources, click here.

The True Origin of Killer Clowns | Origin of Everything

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Well, sure the answer is partly from 1980s horror movies like IT and Killer Klowns from Outer Space, but the reality is much deeper than that. From the Middle Ages through the Renaissance to 19th Century England, clowns have always been around to bring a little chaos. And the truth is, up until the late 1800s they were NEVER for kids. The truth is, terrifying killer clowns are nothing new.

Is Miku Hatsune A More Authentic Pop Star Than Lana Del Rey? | PBS Idea Channel

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Lana Del Rey might be The Girl Who Launched a Thousand Blog Posts, but we think there might be something else really interesting here. How is it that she, a real person, pales in Pop Star Comparison to a computer program? With the rise of Miku Hatsune, a computer generated pop star from Japan, and the recent kerfuffle surrounding Lana Del Rey's album release, we take a look at what it means to be authentic in today's music world. Is Miku Hatsune, a piece of software, more authentic than human being Lana Del Rey? 

Is Over The Garden Wall About Having Faith? | PBS Idea Channel

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Our viewers really enjoy the Over the Garden Wall series on Cartoon Network, as indicated by all the comments and tweets. We do too! Wirt and Greg's journey to find their way home through The Unknown makes for not just a great show, but a great exploration into the idea of faith in the face of fear. The show and its two central characters seem to perfectly illustrate cynicism and optimism. So what can we learn from the brothers, as well as Beatrice and their frog, about faith and facing the impossible?

Is The LEGO Movie Anti-Copyright? | PBS Idea Channel

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"Everything is awesome" in the LEGO' movie, except when "Lord Business" gets in the way and wants to control everything and to stifle creativity! Emmet, Wyldstyle, Batman, and others in the movie seem completely opposed to the imposition of any sort of structure that dictates what will be built and how. To us at Idea Channel, this sounds very similar to discussions around copyright law and intellectual property (IP). Are master builders just artists who make good use of the public domain? Can the LEGO movie advocate for open culture even if LEGO itself is historically opposed to it? 

Is BMO From Adventure Time Expressive of Feminism? | PBS Idea Channel

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BMO from the show Adventure Time identifies as both male and female, and because of that expresses the ideals of Third Wave Feminism. Third Wave Feminism questions if gender is actually binary, tied to our biological sex. Is our understanding of masculinity and femininity fair, or even accurate? Of course, BMO has no biological gender, so there's no cultural expectations that anchors her (him?) down. It all seems to be a non-issue in the Adventure Time world. What do you think, is BMO male or female? Or does it even matter? 

Deviance on Stage | The Nance

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Watch this scene from The Nance in which the characters argue about decency laws restricting freedom of expression in the theater in 1930s New York City. Nathan Lane stars in this ensemble production as Chauncey Miles, a homosexual actor working in the burlesque theater district. In this excerpt, the characters discuss Mayor Fiorello La Guardia's efforts to shut down burlesque shows.

The Art of Double Entendre | The Nance

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Watch as actor Nathan Lane defends burlesque comedy performances before a judge in this excerpt from the play The Nance. Lane's character, Chauncey Miles, tries to explain to the court what the term "double entendre" means and why it's funny to audiences. Chauncey is on trial for violating decency laws in the theater in 1930s New York City.

How Does Steven Universe Expand Our Ideas of Family? | PBS Idea Channel

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We love Steven Universe, but what makes it so great? Is it more than just a story of mismatched characters trying to save the world? Could Steven Universe really be about family and how it's impossible to define it universally? What else, or who else, can we call family? Are fandoms family? Can things be family? 

How is Seeing Enders Game a Political Action? | PBS Idea Channel

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The science fiction novel Ender's Game has been a part of the sci-fi canon for the past 30+ years and with its huge new blockbuster movie release, it's bigger than ever. But its author, Orson Scott Card, has inspired more debate than the novel itself. Card has been labeled homophobic, racist, and a handful of other distasteful things, and the opinions held by Card have created a great deal of anger and opposition. Now that Ender's Game has been made into a movie, this leads to a big question: should you see it? Does buying a ticket to a film equal an endorsement of the creator's ideas? Or, should you join the bandwagon of boycotts against the film? Should you avoid it based on your moral beliefs? 

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