Science

Science (X) - Geography (X)

Food Miles

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In this video, students consider the environmental impacts of America's current food system. In the 21st century global food economy, most foods travel an average of 1,500 miles from farm to plate. As renowned author Michael Pollan elaborates, the impacts of this fossil fuel-driven system are detrimental to the environment, but also to our health and social well-being. Writer Michael Shuman argues that investing in local food systems lessens the distance between who we are and what we eat and creates wealth in the community.

Energy for a Developing World

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In this video, meet an entrepreneur who is bringing solar energy to Bangladesh. Since 1976, Muhammad Yunus has been dedicated to fighting poverty and empowering women in Bangladesh and the world. He recognizes the importance of energy as a factor in economic growth for the poor people of Bangladesh. In 1996, Yunus started Grameen Shakti, a not-for-profit company, to promote, develop and popularize renewable energy technologies in remote areas of Bangladesh. By focusing on solar, biogas, and other forms of renewable energy, Grameen Shakti sees a future where rural households will have access to reliable, environmentally friendly energy at affordable costs.

Seoul: The Stream of Consciousness

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Discover how efforts to reduce traffic by building more roadways paradoxically increased traffic. Learn about a project to remove one roadway and revitalize the stream beneath. In 2003, the city of Seoul took a rare step "back in time," demolishing a major downtown freeway to uncover and restore the ancient Cheonggyecheon stream that once flowed beneath it. An impressive feat of engineering, the project re-purposed more than 75 percent of the dismantled highway material for reconstruction and rehabilitation of the stream's banks and commercial corridor. The Cheonggyecheon is now a vital part of the city's commercial and tourism sectors and has proven that environmental restoration can revive culture and community, as well.

Faces of America | A Piece of the Pie

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In this video from Faces of America, historian Henry Louis Gates, Jr. examines how DNA can communicate ethnic identity in a manner that genealogy can’t always articulate. Gates meets with Joanna Mountain from the genetic ancestry firm 23 and Me to complete an admixture test. The test reveals not only ancestral geographical origins over a number of centuries, but also illustrates ethnic breakdown. Gates reveals the ethnic breakdown (in the form of a pie chart) of his guests including Meryl Streep, Stephen Colbert, Eva Longoria and Elizabeth Alexander.

Harvesting the Wind

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In this video, discover how wind farms may be the salvation of small-town America. In the southwest corner of Minnesota - the Buffalo Ridge region - there is a productive and progressive wind industry that is not only providing clean energy, but also economic opportunity and prosperity to the local community. Dan Juhl, president of Woodstock Wind Farm, will describe the process by which he leased land to create a wind farm in the Buffalo Ridge region of Minnesota.

Citizen Scientists | Idaho Science Journal

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A new smart phone app is helping citizen scientists leave their mark.

Idaho State University researchers have developed an app for community input on the Portneuf River. Reporter Kris Millgate follows one family as they use the app to help stakeholders discover the places people value along the river.

 

State of Resolve

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In this video, explore the politics behind the passage of two critical environmental laws in California. Could California's progressive energy policies spearhead a nationwide shift toward cleaner energy? The remarkable laws that California has passed under Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to regulate greenhouse gas emissions perpetuate the state's reputation for environmental leadership across the country, and potentially the globe.

POV | Good Fortune: Lessons in International Development

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In this lesson, students will watch video clips and read interviews with experts that will help them examine different approaches to international aid and development and begin to identify which approaches are most effective. The lesson features excerpts from the film Good Fortune, which presents the viewpoints of two Kenyans who resist development projects intended to improve quality of life in their country.

Fort Peck Dam: The Mighty Missouri

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The Missouri River spans 2,300 miles across the American landscape from the headwaters in Montana to where it meets the Mississippi near St. Louis. The Missouri represented a vital route that transported goods and supplies between the cities of the Midwest and outposts at Great Falls and Fort Benton. Unfortunately, the turning of the seasons froze the Missouri in its Montana roots and spring brought huge floods that destroyed crops in the rural farms and destroyed homes and businesses in urban Kansas City.  Ambitious plans were proposed, and were the focus of much debate, but no financier could afford the cost of harnessing the Big Muddy.

Disappearing Farm Land: Part One | Idaho Science Journal

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Farmer Clay Erskine was feeling a bit squeezed. New homes were popping up around his farm land, so he had to move. Researchers at Boise State University predict the Treasure Valley’s population could grow by as much as 160 percent by the turn of the next century and much of that growth will come at the expense of agricultural land. Learn more.

Water Pollution Investigation

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Water pollution is the contamination of water resources by harmful wastes or toxins. This type of pollution can be dangerous to animals and plant populations in and around lakes, rivers, polluted groundwater areas or oceans, and can pose major problems for humans as well. Explore the detrimental effects of plastic waste pollution on the San Francisco Bay—specifically, mercury contamination, with this resource group from QUEST.

A World Away

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Middle school students from across Maryland spend a week at Camp North Bay to build self-confidence and learn ways that they can take good risks to make a difference in our environment. Students have opportunities to discover and identify different types of wildlife in the area, ride a 500 foot long zip line, and learn meaningful lessons about positively interacting with each other and with nature.

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan Face Desperate Conditions | PBS Newshour

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Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan are returning to flattened communities with no food, water or sanitation, as officials struggle to provide relief. This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on November 12th, 2013.

Rolling Thunder River Company | Fast Forward

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We go to McCaysville to meet a group a people who claim their jobs are better than a vacation. They’re river guides at Rolling Thunder River Company, a white water rafting company where the employees, surprisingly, still use math to do those jobs. They also use a host of certifications to ensure customer safety. Oh, and being an Eagle Scout doesn't hurt either.

Where's Plum From?

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Meet Plum, a friendly purple alien—and video game designer—from the barren planet Blorb, in this video from PLUM LANDING. She's visiting Planet Earth to collect data for a new game for her fellow Blorbians. Plum can’t leave her spaceship, so she befriends a group of kids on Earth and sends them on missions to trek across deserts, plunge over waterfalls, climb mountains, and journey through the jungle, in order to learn all about life on Earth.

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