Elementary

Computer Science (X) - Elementary (X)

Do an Hour of Code | Tynker

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Build the computer literacy and problem solving skills students need to become innovators of the future. 

Introduce students to computer programming, or take their coding skills to the next level as they engage in fun activities and projects that enhance STEM learning outcomes. With an Hour of Code with Tynker, teachers can easily introduce the basics of computer programming in a fun and intuitive way.  Start with any of the six adventure puzzles, then students can apply what they’ve learned to create fun projects to share with others – multi-level and multi-player games, math patterns, interactive comics and greeting cards. 

No programming experience is required.  Use the resources provided to quickly plan a successful Hour of Code for your class. Students can access Candy Quest and Dragon Dash puzzles from this site.  The rest of the activities, plus a teacher's guide and answer keys, can be found at hourofcode.tynker.com.

Building a Fence

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In this Cyberchase video segment, Harley convinces Harry to help put up a fence in their grandmother's backyard. With no instructions other than to put up the fence in the shape of a rectangle, Harry must figure out how to do this with different lengths of fencing. He breaks the problem down by adding up different combinations of pieces and then drawing a diagram to figure out where to place the pieces.

GPS: Gravity Fountain

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This DragonflyTV follows two girls as they learn about the effect of pressure on the stream of water from a fountain, and set out to design a gravity-fed fountain that shoots water 20 feet into the air

Horsepower

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In this video, a young man talks about buying a new car and tries to understand what horsepower really means. With some help from a young woman who explains where the term comes from, he sets out to look for more information to find his perfect car. In the accompanying classroom activity, students conduct an experiment to calculate how much horsepower they can produce. This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School Collection.

What is a fractal (and why do they matter)? | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Fractals are complex, never-ending patterns created by repeating mathematical equations. Yuliya, a undergrad in Math at MIT, delves into their mysterious properties and how they can be found in technology and nature.

Blossom and Snappy Build Scale Models | Count On It!

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Blossom and Snappy learn about scale models and how they are used in the design and construction of buildings. They visit an architectural firm, a construction site, Clark Atlanta University Art Gallery, and Clark Atlanta University Science Center. They learn how to build their own scale model of a house.

Applied Imagination | Muse Moments

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Meet the Applied Imagination team, visit the workshop, and witness the process of creating intricate garden railway displays. Each building in these tiny towns is historically accurate, architecturally correct, and constructed of plant materials.

Star Trek at 50: Science Fiction or Science Fact? | STEM in 30

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50 years ago this September, one of the most popular shows in the history of television premiered. Star Trek has inspired generations of scientists, astronauts, and engineers, and introduced many technologies that have gone from science fiction to science reality. Boldly go on a voyage with STEM in 30 as we explore the Star Trek universe, including the studio model of the starship Enterprise on display in our Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall.

Design Squad: Sound

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Learn about the fundamentals of sound as student teams create percussive and stringed instruments for a local band, in this video segment adapted from DESIGN SQUAD—a PBS TV series featuring high school contestants tackling engineering challenges. In the process, the teams learn about the physics of sound and music and then apply this knowledge to the construction of their own instruments. Watch to find out which instruments the band finds worthy of debuting in their next live show.

Kites | STEM in 30

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Did you know that the first aeronautical object in the National Air and Space Museum collection is a kite acquired in 1876? Kites aren’t only fun objects to fly at the beach or on the National Mall, they have a long and important history. The Wright brothers tested their wing warping theory with a kite and kites have also been used during wartime. In this episode of STEM in 30 we’ll look at not only how kites fly but their importance to aviation history.

MN Original | Assemblage Artist Jan Elftmann

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Learn how Jan Elftmann’s penchant for collecting objects shines through in all of her work. She makes art approachable for the every day person in her playful assemblage work and eye-catching art cars.

Elftmann helped found the Minnesota ArtCar Parade after she completed her first art car–a pick up truck covered with 10,000 wine bottle corks. She’s currently working on her third art car.

For more MN Original resources, click here.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

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This video segment from Building Big highlights the Clifton Suspension Bridge, one of the earliest of its kind. Though it was completed in 1864, when pedestrians, animals, and horse-drawn carriages were its main forms of traffic, its iron chain-link cables and stone piers today carry four million cars and other vehicles a year.

How to Make Your Own Font | Full-Time Kid

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Create a font on your computer using your own handwriting!

World War I: Legacy, Letters and Belgian War Lace | STEM in 30

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In this STEAM inspired STEM in 30, we will look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane’s legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we’ll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lace makers helped feed a nation.

Designing the Mall | The National Mall - America's Front Yard

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Learn about the evolution and design of the National Mall from its inception and explore the early considerations made by its designer, Pierre Charles L’Enfant. The design of the capitol city involved converting tidal flats, forests, and farmland into the major landmarks we see today. L’Enfant placed major landmarks on high points, placing the Capitol Building on the highest spot. Other design elements included a space for the President's house, the Washington Monument, and a grand promenade, lined with buildings and a broad canal, better known today as our National Mall.

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