Fine Arts

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X)

Duke

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This video segment from Weston Woods presents the story of Duke by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney, and is about Duke Ellington, one of the founding fathers of jazz. When Duke Ellington was young, his parents wanted him to learn to play the piano. Although he began lessons, he was soon lured away by his love of baseball. Later, as a teenager he heard the new musical style called "ragtime" and he was inspired once again to learn to play piano. Soon, he created his own style of music using "hops" and "slides" on the piano. He became a popular entertainer with a flair that attracted many fans.

ArtQuest: Discovering Symbols

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Coastie and Dajiah find symbols around them

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos | Everyday Learning

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Students attend a celebration for the Day of the Dead or Dia de los Muertos, a Mexican holiday. The holiday celebrates the lives of friends and family members that have died.

Taiko Dojo: Music

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In this Spark video produced by KQED, hear the taiko drumming of Grand Master Seiichi Tanaka and the San Francisco Taiko Dojo. This art form is being performed in San Jose's Japantown as the Taiko Dojo troop seek to keep this musical form and piece of Japanese heritage alive.

Stained Glass in the Style of Chris Dutch

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Use glue, chalk, and paper to create "stained glass" art by following the steps in this demonstration video.

Geometric Quilts in the Style of Martha Osborn

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Use geometry skills to create quilt patterns by following the steps described in this demonstration video.  You may also want to view the program Martha Osborn - Fabric Artist to see more examples of her work.

Elisa Korenne: Hormel Girls

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In 1947, Jay Hormel founded the Hormel Girls to create jobs for women veterans of World War II and to promote Hormel products like Spam and Dinty Moore. The glamourous group of musicians and singers grew to include 60 members and was a top rated show on three national radio networks. The Hormel Girls are a true treasure of Minnesota history and an early symbol of the independent woman.

Lewis W. Hine

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Lewis W. Hine, a sociologist and photographer, used his camera as an instrument of social change often risking his own life to expose poor working conditions in U.S. factories where child labor was in full force.

Speer & the City | Colorado Experience

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Robert Speer was born in Pennsylvania in 1855 and traveled to Colorado to cure his TB when he was 22 years old, which he did. In 1884, Speer ran for City Clerk, just as Colorado was hitting a large economic boom off the mining of Silver and other ore. The election was fraudulent, ballots were stuffed, and Speer won the election. The 1893 Chicago World Fair inspired Speer to beautify Denver. “The City Beautiful” was the idea put forth which involved Greco-Roman styles of engineering and a large shift towards public parks. Civic Center Park was Speer’s baby, which is surrounded by the State Capitol, the City and County Building, and the Denver Art Museum. He would move on to become mayor in 1904 and reelected in 1908, again, with suspicions of a fraudulant election. However, Speer was a brilliant politician who was able to convince wealthy people to give funds towards the construction of Civic Center Park. Speer Blvd. is named thusly as he put forth the construction of the barriers which enclose Cherry Creek today. The greening of Denver was a program to incentivize people to plant trees and plants. Speer doubled the amount of park space. Speer died in 1918, before the parks were fully completed. In 2012 Civic Center Park became a national historic landmark, one of about two thousand on the list.

Profiles of the American West: Charles Russell - How the West is Fun

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Charlie Russell captured the cowboys, American Indians, and livestock of the American West in his vivid paintings and realistic sculptures.

Please Stand for the National Anthem Lesson Plan

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This lesson plan, to be used with the program The War of 1812, has students explore what Nationalism means as well as the symbolic features of a nation such as a national anthem and a flag. Students will learn the story of Francis Scott Key and create their own anthems.

Earlville Opera House

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Built in 1892, the Earlville Opera House hosted a wide variety of theatrical events including vaudeville acts, lavish productions and motion pictures. When a decline in attendance forced the theater to close in the 1950’s, the opera house remained a concern for citizens until 1971 when it was reopened and brought back to life. Today, it is fully restored and remains an example for the community’s passion for its past. 

Corning Museum of Glass

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Originally opened in 1851, Bay State Glass now known as Corning Incorporated celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1951 by creating Corning Museum of Glass. CMOG is one of the largest museums dedicated to telling the history of glass and its exhibits explore over 3,500 years of glass history. Today, museum visitors watch glass demonstrations and experience hands on exhibits. 

Scandinavian Traditions | Music and Tradition

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Traditional music and dance is one way that North Dakotans celebrate their Scandinavian heritage and find part of their own identity in their ethnic background. “No tree grows strong by cutting off its roots.” Understanding where we come from helps us know who we are. North Dakota’s largest demographic is people of Scandinavian descent. Many people in North Dakota are aware of their roots, know who they are, and take an active role in keeping those traditions alive.

Boyz II Men | Billy Joel: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize

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Experience a musical tribute to Billy Joel in this clip featuring the ensemble Boyz II Men at the annual Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. In commemoration of George and Ira Gershwin's contributions to American song and culture, the Library of Congress names an annual award to an American musican. The George and Ira Gershwin Collection is housed in the Music Division of the Library of Congress and provides a wealth of orchestrations, lyric sheets, librettos, and audio recordings.

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