Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X) - Civics and Government (X)

Debating Slavery

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This video segment adapted from Africans in America explores the division among the state delegates to the Constitutional Convention about the issue of slavery. Although some states had already begun to abolish slavery, other states held that the right to own slaves should remain protected by the federal government. What resulted was a debate about the right to personal liberty and the right to own property, which for many included slaves.

Prairie Churches | Expressions of Faith

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Learn about Vikur Lutheran Church in Mountain, North Dakota. A montage of northern plains churches illustrates NDSU History Professor Tom Isern’s assertion that we can learn from prairie churches about the people of the plains who built them.

Liberty Minutes | Fight for Statehood

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Listen as Wayne Stenehjem discusses the issues North Dakota confronted in its fight for statehood.

It's All Earth and Sky | Citizenship and Language

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Brian Schweitzer and Al Neuharth talk about their ancestors’ citizenship status, and all five descendants talk of their family’s experiences with the German language. As they adjusted to a new life, the first generation found that learning a new language often proved difficult.

 

The White House: Inside Story | White House Renovations

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By the time Harry Truman and his family moved into the White House in 1945, the house had been home to many first families. Renovations and additions had been built haphazardly, and the upkeep of the house was not always the highest priority. After inspectors came in, Truman was told that the White House was standing up “from force of habit only.” It was under Truman that the most significant renovation of the House took place: the house was gutted and rebuilt with metal supports. When Jackie Kennedy moved in, she was disappointed to find very little interior decoration or historic furnishings. She undertook a vast renovation and brought back many historic items to the home. Today, the White House is not only a home and an office; it is also a museum that is a testament to both the Truman and Kennedy administrations.

Indian Pride | Tribal Relations | Part 2

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JuniKae Randall interviews Edward Thomas, president of the Tlingit and Haida Central Council of Alaska, about tribal relationships with the United States government.

Prairie Places | Powers Reserved to the People

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The power of the people is discussed in terms of the initiative and the referendum. 

Your Vote Counts!

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Video reading of Your Vote Counts!

The Immigrant Experience in Idaho: Forgotten Neighbors | Idaho Experience

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In 1870 nearly one-third of the Idaho Territory’s population was Chinese. Most of these individuals were men who worked in mines, though a handful of Chinese women found their way to Idaho. Although the majority of the workers ultimately returned to China, they left a substantial impact on the American West, through the infrastructure they built and the Western culture they influenced.

Somali Muslims in Maine | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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In recent years, more than 1,000 Somalis have moved to Lewiston, Maine. At first, Lewiston's mainly white, working class residents were accepting of their new neighbors, but as more and more Somalis streamed into the former mill town, tensions began to flare between longtime residents and the new immigrants. This video from  Religion & Ethics Newsweekly looks at this controversial migration and its impact on the community.

Alexander Hamilton: Early Influences

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This video segment adapted from American Experience describes the early life of one of America's Founding Fathers—Alexander Hamilton. Born outside of the thirteen American colonies on a small tropical island, Hamilton's struggles begin early when his father leaves and his mother dies of yellow fever. As a teenager, he learns about international finance by working for an export company, hones his writing skills, and witnesses the degradation of slavery.

Ramadan Observance | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Afeefa Syeed, the mother of three boys in Sterling, Virginia, states, “Ramadan is considered a visitor that comes once a year, so you open your doors and you let the visitor come in and basically take over your life.” This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows Syeed and her family as they observe the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

Ramadan Moon | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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For Muslims around the world, Ramadan is the holiest month in Islam, a time of prayer and daily fasting, as well as celebration. The start of Ramadan is signaled by the sighting of the crescent moon (hilal). This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows the process of sighting the new moon for Muslims in America.

Muslims in America | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Since September 11th, Muslims across the nation have faced numerous new challenges and opportunities as they continue to define their community in America. One of the key challenges has been differentiating themselves from terrorists in the eyes of the government and the public. This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly examines both the internal and external challenges facing American Muslims in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.

A Case for the Separation of Powers

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In this video segment adapted from American Experience, historians examine how John Adams advocated for a separation of powers when he wrote the Massachusetts Constitution in 1779. Adams called for a strong executive branch, two legislative branches, and an independent judiciary branch. This state constitution became the model upon which the federal constitution was based.

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