Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - WNET (X) - U.S. History (X)

The New Negro

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Arturo Schomburg, a historian, writer and collector of artifacts of African culture and history, was an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Today, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is a national research library that collects, preserves and provides access to resources documenting the history and experiences of peoples of African descent. This video segment from A Walk Through Harlem discusses Schomburg's life and talks about some of the important writers and poets of the Harlem Renaissance.

The Sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis

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During World War II, the South Pacific Philippine Sea was not only the site of many battles but also where the United States had many ships stationed.  One of the ships was the U.S.S. Indianapolis, which sank after being torpedoed by an enemy submarine. This History Detectives video segment chronicles that attack from the perspective of one survivor, L.D. Cox.  While being interviewed about his memories of a fellow sailor, Cox describes the sinking from the instant the boat was hit to the moment he heard the engines of the rescue planes.  He illustrates his furious swim away from the sinking vessel, surviving extreme dehydration and floating for days in shark-infested waters. 

St. Domingue | The African Americans

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Learn about the slave revolt in St. Domingue (now Haiti) that led to the world’s first black republic in this video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

Creative Resistance | The African Americans

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In this video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross, we learn that despite the efforts of Europeans to erase the identities of slaves, they created a new culture.

Haitian Carnival | The African Americans

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This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross explores the culture and ideas that passed throughout the Black Atlantic and how it continues to inflect our traditions.

Fugitive Slave Act | The African Americans

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This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross explains the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, and what led to its implementation.

Colonial House

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In an experiment to experience the realities of life in colonial America, seventeen people in 2004 participated in a reenactment to build a settlement on the New England coast in a similar scenario to settlers of the year 1628.  In this video segment from Colonial House, modern day colonists struggle to build homes, grow crops and fight frequent illness caused by exhaustion and exposure to cold.  They also have to establish relationships with the native Passamaquoddy people in order to gain the seed needed to plant a corn crop.  There are fears exhibited by both sides when the colonists and the Passamaquoddy people first meet.

 

What was the Harlem Renaissance? | A Walk Through Harlem

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This video segment from A Walk Through Harlem takes a look at the Harlem Renaissance, a large social and cultural movement of the early 1900s -1930s stemming from the “Great Migration" of African Americans from the rural South to cities of the urban North of the United States. In New York City, they found their voices in a politically, socially and culturally vibrant Harlem. Harlem spawned writers and poets like Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston,  whose writing encouraged African Americans to take on an independent, enlightened approach to education, culture and politics.

Sapelo Island Culture

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This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents the Gullah/Geechee community of Sapelo Island, a barrier island located off the coast of Georgia. The original Gullah/Geechee people were enslaved there but when slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the former slaves. Sapelo Island's valuable land is now threatened as it is the only Gullah/Geechee community to successfully resist real estate development. Each year, in order to preserve and educate people outside Sapelo, island residents hold a festival bringing people to the island to teach them about Gullah/Geechee life and culture.

Hutchinson’s Rebellion | The African Americans

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In this video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross, examine Hutchinson’s rebellion (also known as the Stono rebellion), a slave revolt that started outside Charleston, SC, but ultimately failed.

The Fourteenth Amendment - Part I

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By the end of the Civil War, the Union victory over the Confederate states marked a dramatic change in American history with the abolition of slavery and new amendments written into the U.S. Constitution. Passed in 1868, the 14th Amendment gave Congress special powers to protect and enforce the rights of former slaves in Southern states that adopted the greatest resistance to the new set of liberties afforded African Americans through citizenship. In this first of two video segments from The Supreme Court, learn how the nine justices evolved in their decisions to interpret the 14th Amendment as the nation moved forward after the war. To learn more, see “The Fourteenth Amendment - Part II.”

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