Social Studies

ELA (X) - Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X)

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Why Can't Anyone Agree on the Crime Rate? | Above the Noise

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The news media is chock-full of contradictory stories about crime in the United States. Are murders on the rise, or at remarkable lows? A skim of the headlines might not give you a clear answer. So why is there room for disagreement about what should be a very basic statistic? The answer isn’t really about the data itself, but how we slice and dice that data. It’s about how we determine trends, what we’re comparing, and sometimes, what answer we want to find. In this Above the Noise video, host Shirin Ghaffary looks into why the crime rate in America can be such a confusing, and often misleading, topic to read and write about.

National Aquarium Dolphins Move to Seaside Sanctuary | PBS NewsHour

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Find out why the National Aquarium has decided to end its dolphin program by 2020 with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 14, 2016.

West Virginia | Three Rivers: The Bluestone, Gauley and New

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3 Rivers: the Bluestone, Gauley, and New documents the economic, social, and political impact of the rivers on Southern and Central West Virginia.  Included in Teachers Resources is a cross-curricular unit which addresses the West Virginia Content Standards and Objectives for 8th grade West Virginia Studies.  The video is divided into 4 chapters: Introduction, Bluestone, Gauley, and New.  Curriculum is available under the Resource tab by the content area.

Ben Hall of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ben Hall of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island and community. We learn the island is made up of some of the most valuable real estate in America, but its inhabitants have resisted the sort of development that has captured the other coastal islands off the shores of Georgia and South Carolina. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island."

Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island.The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ronald Johnson of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. A festival is held each year to bring people to the island to learn about the culture and foster interest in preserving the culture. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ben Hall of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island".

City Horses Part I

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When you think of horses you don’t usually think of the city, but in this segment from Wild TV, Carolyne DeGrammont tells us about the Cedar Lane Stables in Queens, one of the five boroughs of New York City. People with different levels of skills with horses as well as people from all disciplines and backgrounds come to the stables. For Carolyne, going to the stables helps her find relief from the stresses of her fast-paced day. She can forget all of her troubles and feel happy. The atmosphere helps her feel connected to nature, too.

Rosemary Wells

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Rosemary Wells is the author and illustrator of delightful books for youngsters. In this interview, Wells talks about creating books for children and their adult readers that will stand up to being read over and over again. Watch the interview, view the interview transcript, read a short biography on Rosemary Wells, or see a selected list of her children's books.

The Blizzard of '49 | Operation Haylift & Snowbound

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The Storm of the Century: The Blizzard of 49 is a WyomingPBS documentary.  This documentary tells the story of the worst series of storms in Wyoming's history.  But for all the tragedy and loss, suffering, and death, there was hope and heroism, unselfish sacrifice, and generosity. Students will learn about the Blizzard of 1949 and the emergency actions taken by the United States government in response.

The resource videos are based on this documentary and include associated lesson plans.  There are two video clips. Clip one starts at the beginning and ends at 3:25 minutes, Clip two begins at 3:40 minutes and ends at 8:02 minutes. 

 

 

Students will learn about the Blizzard of 1949 and the emergency actions taken by the United States government in response.

Family History | History Detectives

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Family stories are a rich window on the past. They can paint pictures of an important period in history through the experience, perspective, and memories of people who lived during that time. These lesson plans and videos, based on artifacts and family heirlooms featured in History Detectives episodes, offer students opportunities to dig deeper into their own family history. Through activities that emphasize genealogical research and oral history interviews, students can begin to discover and access new information about themselves—as well as acquire the skills required to become history detectives in their own right.

Historical Research | History Detectives

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By the middle of the 19th century, a vast new territory from New Mexico all the way to California beckoned settlers and homesteaders. But as their wagon trains rumbled west from Missouri, along major arteries such as the Santa Fe Trail, they cut through the heart of Indian country and came under frequent attack. More than a century and a half after these violent events, History Detectives takes a closer look at an old paper that shows President Millard Fillmore engaged in what appears to be an unusual act for the time - sparing the life of a Native American convicted of murder. In the paper the President commutes the death sentence to life in prison for a solitary Native American named See-See-Sah-Mah, convicted of murdering a St. Louis trader along the Santa Fe Trail. Fillmore’s pardon saved See-See-Sah-Mah’s life, but why?

Native American Reaction to Western Immigration | Wild Nevada

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Why does change often result in conflict? Learn about the Native American reaction to western immigration of the Great Basin in Nevada as told to Wild Nevada by Leah Brady, Shoshone historian. Understanding the concept of change and its effects is fundamental to understanding history.  The story of westward expansion includes many aspects of change. Students will explore how conflicts and compromise shaped Nevada’s history by exploring how westward expansion affected the Native Americans living in the Great Basin, in Nevada. By analyzing multiple perspectives on the topic, students will gain a deeper understanding of how Native Americans responded to the closing of the frontier.

Manifest Destiny | Wild Nevada

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Manifest Destiny, our nation’s idea that is it our “obvious fate” or God-given right to own the entire continent of North America from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean, drove western expansion in the 1800s. As the United States expanded westward, it brought enlightenment, freedom, technology and democracy with it. In this inquiry, students will challenge their understanding of manifest destiny by looking at multiple perspectives on how westward expansion affected the Native Americans living in the Great Basin, in Nevada. By analyzing multiple perspectives on the topic, students will gain a deeper understanding how Native Americans responded to the closing of the frontier.

Lived History: The Story of the Wind River Virtual Museum | Wyoming's Native Americans

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'Lived History' documents the making of the Wind River Virtual Museum, a high definition archive of Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho ancestral artifacts. From the time when Europeans first traveled in North America, they took collectors' interest in the arts, weaponry and attire of Native Americans. Sometimes they purchased artifacts, sometimes they stole them, and sometimes they killed for them. Over the years, pipes, war bonnets, cradle boards and parfleches accumulated in museums. The method of acquisition was often forgotten; exact historical documentation was often difficult. Many of the artifacts have perished or deteriorated over time. Many ancient artifacts remain in the vaults and display cases of museums far from their place of origin or the people who might best explain and appreciate them.

"Lived History" documents the creation of the 'Wind River Virtual Museum'—an archive of high definition images of ancestral artifacts created with guidance from Wind River tribal elders. Items like nineteenth century amulets, bags, drums, ceremonial headdresses and robes, everyday clothing, medicine related objects, hunting apparel, moccasins, and other meaningful objects were brought out of storage and displayed for the elders. Their commentary becomes part of the precarious and precious transmission of oral culture that the people of Wind River strive to honor and preserve, for future generations. 

Impacts of Cultural Diffusion | Wild Nevada

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In the late 1800’s, the federal government began sending Native American children to off-reservation boarding schools. This was an attempt to assimilate Native Americans into American culture. While at the boarding schools, Native American children could not speak their native languages, use their given names, practice their religion or culture. Instead, they were given Anglo-American names, clothing, and haircuts. Their school curriculum included classes in reading, writing, and math but focused on vocational training.

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