Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - High (X) - Prairie Public (X) - U.S. History (X)

Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota | Scenic State Park

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Learn about Scenic State Park, that has one of the most distinctive collections of decorative arts in Minnesota.

A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson | Segues Between Experiences

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Gudmundson evolves into visually recording social issues related to the landscape.

Wayne Gudmundson’s black-and-white photographs are admired not only for their beauty, but also for their cultural significance – they capture the grandeur of Gudmundson’s native North Dakota landscape with a focus that evokes a meaningful sense of place. A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson chronicles the route this prolific photographer has taken – how his Icelandic heritage relates to his craft, the mentors and muses that inspire him, the students who enthuse him, and the philosophy that explains his considered view.

A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson | Teacher and Visual Artist

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Gudmundson is both a Zen master in the classroom and a nationally recognized photographic artist.

Wayne Gudmundson’s black-and-white photographs are admired not only for their beauty, but also for their cultural significance – they capture the grandeur of Gudmundson’s native North Dakota landscape with a focus that evokes a meaningful sense of place. A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson chronicles the route this prolific photographer has taken – how his Icelandic heritage relates to his craft, the mentors and muses that inspire him, the students who enthuse him, and the philosophy that explains his considered view

Indian Pride | Spirituality | Part 3

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Joseph Fire Crow of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe of Montana performs traditional music through singing, flutes, and other instruments.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | The Decline of Railroads and Streetcars

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Discover how the building and use of railroads declined due to the popularity of automobiles and trucks. One effect was the development of regional and short line railroads that served smaller communities. Several larger cities used local electric streetcars until the automobiles took over.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | In Mid-continent and “The Holy Dog”

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Discover how transportation has affected every step of North Dakota history. North Dakota’s position in the center of North America has always made transportation a challenge with even the earliest peoples seeking ways to cover large distances of land. The arrival of horses to the Northern Plains had a radical effect on the Native American culture and way of life.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Roads from WWII to the Present

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Learn how World War II meant funding was diverted to all but strategic roads and highways. After the war, the state had to play catch-up on road maintenance, helped by federal funding of the interstate system. In today's world, larger and heavier trucks are critical to transporting freight. In rural North Dakota, providing local transit for a growing senior citizen population is a big issue.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Water Communication

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Learn how rivers already provided an avenue for the movement of goods and people in 1803 when Lewis and Clark traveled up the Missouri River to look for a waterway to the West.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Individual Freedom

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Learn about the history of automobiles in North Dakota. The automobile age gave freedom of movement and choice for passengers and freight. With more people driving cars, the push came for better roads.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | “A Reluctant and Homesick Pig”

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Learn about the history of steamboats on the Red River. Although its course meandered like a lost and homesick pig, the Red River of the North was a major artery for steamboats, which coordinated with stagecoaches from St. Paul to Fort Abercrombie.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Peerless Transportation

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Learn about the role of railroads in North Dakota history. In their time, railroads had no peer in their ability to move people and goods, although shipping costs were high. The railroad companies helped increase immigration to North Dakota by actively marketing the opportunities here to foreigners, especially Scandinavians and Germans from Russia.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Red River Oxcarts

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Learn about the Red River oxcarts that were the primary means of transporting goods from the Red River Valley to St. Paul.

Red River Land | History of Travel | The Automobile

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At first people in the Red River Valley thought that automobiles were a nuisance that scared horses, but as automobiles became cheaper people began to trade in their carts and carriages for cars.  The gasoline engine resulted in big changes, and automobiles began realizing their full potential when a suitable network of roads was built in North Dakota. Electric streetcars and motorized busses provided city transit.

Red River Land | History of Travel | Wheels and Boats

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The first method of transportation in the Red River Valley that used wheels was the “Red River cart.”  These were built by the Métis people, who were both Chippewa and French. Covered wagons and stagecoaches followed.  River travel included steamboats and barges.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kathleen Enders

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Learn why Kathleen Enders of Tioga, North Dakota, views all the change in her small town as an exciting opportunity for Tioga to grow. “Our town would die and become a ghost town if we didn’t have the change.”

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