Social Studies

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SRSLY What Does IKEA Say About The Human Condition? | PBS Idea Channel

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While a huge corporate entity may not be the most likely place to find discussion points for the human condition, we're going to tackle this subject anyway. In particular, what is "The IKEA Effect?" What is it about building your own furniture that is so satisfying, or frustrating? We can also undoubtedly find some metaphors in the labyrinthine layouts of their stores themselves! What does IKEA say about the human condition?

King Cotton and the Cotton Gin | Georgia Stories

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Today if you drive through Georgia in the summer, you will pass miles and miles of cotton fields. That was not always the case. It took one very small sized invention to make the difference – Eli Whitney’s cotton gin. With the debut of his invention in 1793, the history and economy of Georgia as well as that of the entire South was changed forever.

The French Family | The Homefront

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Learn about the challenges of the military lifestyle for kids in this clip from The Homefront. Army Colonel Jeffrey French, his wife Kathy, and their three children Kyle (20), Sarah (19) and Annemarie (13) are currently stationed at the Army War College in Carlisle, PA—their eleventh duty station. For the kids, these moves have meant leaving friends and changing schools frequently—as many as nine, in Kyle's case. While deployed to Afghanistan in 2009-2010, Jeff's unit suffered many casualties, and several of its soldiers were found guilty of war crimes. Despite this challenging period, the Frenches remain committed to the Army—particularly their son, Kyle, who is following in his father's footsteps and is now a third year cadet at West Point.

It Wasn't Called PTSD | Iwo Jima: From Combat to Comrades

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Iwo Jima was an unusual battle even by WWII’s tough standards. The 8-square mile island had nearly 100,000 combatants on it. In 36 days, 28,000 men died protecting or seizing this piece of volcanic rock…thousands of Japanese are still entombed there. Four out of every five men who fought on this island would either be killed or wounded. Battlefield ghosts stalk both American and Japanese survivors.  Although it was not called PTSD in 1945, it was just as destructive a condition. The men who fought on Iwo Jima describe how they coped after the war. And one fighter pilot describes the unexpected family event that brought him redemption. 

Transfusion | Knocking Film Module

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This clip follows the Thomas family as they struggle to obtain a bloodless liver transplant for their son Seth. It examines the complexities of medical decision-making as family and physicians try to follow religious beliefs and save a young man’s life. Medical ethicists reflect on the Witness’s role in obtaining advancements in treatment that may benefit many people.

A Pellet of Poison | Medicine Woman

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The strange story of how the lives of two famous women—Marie Curie and Doctor Susan Picotte—intersected in 1915. In the autumn of 1915 on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Nebraska a small package arrived at the home of Doctor Susan Picotte. It contained a tiny pellet of radium sent by Madam Marie Curie to save the life of the first Native American doctor as she lay dying of cancer. 

The Unleashing of the Dragon: Hiroshima | Uranium: Twisting the Dragon's Tail

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Learn about acute radiation sickness, in this clip from Uranium: Twisting the Dragon's Tail. August 6, 1945. A Uranium bomb is dropped on the city of Hiroshima. People closest to the blast were instantly vaporized in the tremendous heat. Thos who were not killed in the initial blast and fire began to die in the coming weeks due to the radiation. Listen to Derek explain how Wilfred Burchett, was the first Western journalist to go into the city and document the suffering of 'acute radition sickness' for the world.

Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki | The Bomb

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Learn how the decision to use nuclear weapons happened in this clip from �The Bomb.� After years of massive effort, the bomb became a reality at the successful Trinity test but the fearsome effects of the bomb worried scientists. The Japanense were losing the war and refused to surrender. Watch to find out how President Harry Truman found himself responsible for ending the war and had to make the hard decision between droppping the bomb or continuing their military plan.

Thomas Jefferson and the Giant Moose | It's Okay to Be Smart

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America’s first great science battle wasn’t the space race or the atom bomb, it was fought between Thomas Jefferson, a French nobleman, and in the middle… a giant moose. Some people call Jefferson our only scientist-President, and T.J. himself said that “Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuits of science, by rendering them my supreme delight.”

Finding Your Roots | Founding Mothers

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In this video segment from the PBS series Finding Your Roots, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. traces Maggie Gyllenhaal's Jewish ancestors back thousands of years to the four "founding mothers" in Jewish history. The segment explains why DNA allows Professor Gates to trace Gyllenhaal's family back so far.

West Virginia | Three Rivers: The Bluestone, Gauley and New

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3 Rivers: the Bluestone, Gauley, and New documents the economic, social, and political impact of the rivers on Southern and Central West Virginia.  Included in Teachers Resources is a cross-curricular unit which addresses the West Virginia Content Standards and Objectives for 8th grade West Virginia Studies.  The video is divided into 4 chapters: Introduction, Bluestone, Gauley, and New.  Curriculum is available under the Resource tab by the content area.

Welcome (中国欢迎您) from the First Lady

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Join First Lady Michelle Obama as she discusses her upcoming trip to China and invites students to follow her journey.

Guilford Courthouse | The Southern Campaign

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The Battle of Guilford Courthouse was fought on March 15, 1781. This battle decided the outcome for the Carolinas because even though Cornwallis won, technically, he lost 25% of his force.

Ninety Six: End Game | The Southern Campaign

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Ninety Six was a small frontier town near Greenwood, South Carolina—an essential part of the geography of British strongholds designed to seal off Charleston and the low country from French, Spanish, and Indian attack. At the “Star Fort” in Ninety Six, a band of Loyalists held their ground, waiting to see what would happen.  

On May 21, 1781, General Greene and approximately a thousand troops marched south towards Ninety-Six, to lay siege to the Star Fort.  It is was the longest field siege of The American Revolution. It lasted 28 days.

Kings Mountain: The Turn of the Tide of Success | The Southern Campaign

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Kings Mountain is a rocky wooded hill on the border of North and South Carolina. On October 7, 1780, a thousand Patriots surrounded and attacked the British troops and Loyalist soldiers. This battle would become a major victory and turn the tide for the Patriots.

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