Social Studies

Science (X) - ELA (X) - Social Studies (X)

Historic Relationships Between Dogs and Humans

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from Nature, we learn that dogs were the first creatures to be domesticated. Ancient people thought of dogs as creatures of magic and as spiritual guardians. Dogs were often sacrificed and buried with people to protect them with their magical powers. In Mexico today, hairless Xolo (SHOW-low) dogs are believed to heal pain. Around the world dogs are useful to people for protection because of their bark, which acts as an alarm and can intimidate strangers. Barking dogs are a stronger deterrent for burglars than a burglar alarm.

Animal Shelter Photographer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Fishing for Data in the Radioactive Waters off Fukushima

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from March 6, 2014 will help students understand the dangerous repercussions of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in 2011. Hear the opinions from scientist and Japanese fishermen to learn about radioactivity levels in the water and fish.

The Sled Dogs of the Arctic Circle | Nature

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this Nature video, we learn how the Inuits of the Arctic Circle rely on their dogs. Existing on a diet of snow and seal blubber (fat), these dogs pull the sleds of the Inuits and protect them from wild animals. Multiple dogs pull together to maintain the stability of the sled. Sled dogs sometimes run the equivalent of five marathons (5 x 26.2 miles = 131 miles) per day. They will be the first to fall through the ice if there is a crack, but they recover from the cold plunge quickly. The dogs have evolved to master the harsh environment.

The Hunting Dogs of Papua New Guinea

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from Nature describes the history and uses of the dogs of Papua New Guinea. Men from the Akepangi tribe set out to hunt at dawn. They believe the dogs they take with them have supernatural abilities to track down prey. The dogs are called the singing dogs because they howl but do not bark. In the hunt, the dogs find an opossum in the canopy (upper layer of vegetation). The dogs are more valuable to the hunters than their bows and arrows. The tribe believes the dogs tell them where the evil spirits lie in the jungle.

Mining and the Environment | Wild Nevada

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Will mining ever become obsolete? What are some benefits of mining to the state of Nevada?  Learn some of the Pros and Cons of mining in Nevada as told to Wild Nevada by Sean Pitts, Director of the East Ely Railroad Depot Museum. Nevada’s fourth graders are expected to understand the industries in Nevada that impact them. Mining is an important industry in Nevada. However, there are controversial issues concerning mining that are important to explore, analyze, and discuss. Students will have a better understanding of the effects of mining in Nevada both economically and environmentally.

Social and Historical Perspectives of Dogs

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from Nature, learn about the evolution of dogs. More than 750 million people share their lives with dogs today. This video explores theories of how dogs became a domestic pet. One theory is ancient people tamed wild wolves. This theory is challenged by the idea that wolves evolved themselves into a different species. Biologist Raymond Coppinger believes human garbage heaps may have caused wolves to be drawn to feed on them. Competition among the wolves may have caused them to transform into "dogs,” that were not frightened of humans who came to the dumps.

The Challenges of Breeding Pandas in Captivity

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Zookeepers at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington D.C. were overjoyed when a female giant panda gave birth to her second cub. But a week later, the cub died unexpectedly. PBS NewsHour spoke with Pierre Comizzoli, a reproductive physiologist with the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and Mei Xiang's "personal gynecologist," about the challenges of breeding pandas in captivity. This video and teacher's guide are from PBS NewsHour Extra.

Finally Ebola-Free, Officials Say Guinea Not Safe Yet | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn why officials in Guinea are slow to celebrate the disappearance of Ebola with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from December 29, 2015.

President Visits Alaskan Arctic, Renames Mount McKinley

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Find out why President Obama is visiting the Arctic with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 1, 2015.

Astronaut Scott Kelly Returns to Earth After Year in Space | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch astronaut Scott Kelly's return to earth after one year in space with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 2, 2016.

Facebook Mood Experiment Angers Users

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Help students understand the controversy over Facebook's psychological study of user behavior with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from July 2, 2014. Many Facebook users were upset by news that the social media network manipulated incoming content for hundreds of thousands of people without telling them. The manipulation was conducted for a study -- published in a respected scientific journal -- measuring how attitudes were affected by either positive or negative posts.

Adam Savage of Myth Busters on Why Science Matters | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In a special episode of Above the Noise, host Shirin Ghaffary asked the host of the popular TV show MythBusters, Adam Savage, about why he participated in the March for Science in San Francisco on April 22. Savage is a passionate advocate for science. He says that much of the current opposition to science in this country comes from the belief that it’s an “elitist, provocative way of looking at the world. When in fact, it’s just an attempt to look at the world clearly.” In addition to supporting scientists, Savage says it’s also crucial to teach media literacy so that young people learn how to separate fact from fiction in the media.

New Study Predicts Major Extinction Event in Earth’s Near Future

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Students will analyze a new scientific hypothesis that predicts a major extinction on Earth within the next 100 years with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from June 2, 2014. According to new research published in the journal Science, plant and animal extinctions are happening at a rate 1,000 times greater than before humans walked the Earth.

Is New Orleans Prepared for the Next Katrina?

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Find out what has been done to prepare New Orleans for the next big storm with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from August 25, 2015.

Pages