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There's No Such Thing As Offline?!? | PBS Idea Channel

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From Facebook to bank accounts, you always have some sort of online presence, whether you're actively engaging in front of a screen or not. Because of this we may need to re-evaluate the very word online.

The French Family | The Homefront

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Learn about the challenges of the military lifestyle for kids in this clip from The Homefront. Army Colonel Jeffrey French, his wife Kathy, and their three children Kyle (20), Sarah (19) and Annemarie (13) are currently stationed at the Army War College in Carlisle, PA—their eleventh duty station. For the kids, these moves have meant leaving friends and changing schools frequently—as many as nine, in Kyle's case. While deployed to Afghanistan in 2009-2010, Jeff's unit suffered many casualties, and several of its soldiers were found guilty of war crimes. Despite this challenging period, the Frenches remain committed to the Army—particularly their son, Kyle, who is following in his father's footsteps and is now a third year cadet at West Point.

It Wasn't Called PTSD | Iwo Jima: From Combat to Comrades

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Iwo Jima was an unusual battle even by WWII’s tough standards. The 8-square mile island had nearly 100,000 combatants on it. In 36 days, 28,000 men died protecting or seizing this piece of volcanic rock…thousands of Japanese are still entombed there. Four out of every five men who fought on this island would either be killed or wounded. Battlefield ghosts stalk both American and Japanese survivors.  Although it was not called PTSD in 1945, it was just as destructive a condition. The men who fought on Iwo Jima describe how they coped after the war. And one fighter pilot describes the unexpected family event that brought him redemption. 

“We All Lost Somebody There” – Kenyan Foreign Minister

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on September 24, 2013.

After the terrorist group al-Shabab stormed an upscale shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, PBS NewsHour correspondent Margaret Warner sits down with Kenyan Foreign Minister Amina Mohamed to talk about the attack.

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

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Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.

Mourners Remember Victims Following Orlando Tragedy | PBS NewsHour

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Learn how mourners are remembering the victims following the Orlando tragedy with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 13, 2016.

Contact Tracing | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 5

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Find out why contact tracing is such a crucial part of controlling outbreaks of infectious disease. Tracing back to patient zero during the West African Ebola outbreak shed light on Ebola's zoonotic origins and rapid spread. Contact tracing revealed that one initial "spillover" event—contact between a Guinean child and a bat in 2015—resulted in the largest Ebola outbreak the world had ever seen.

Dodging Bullets | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 8

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The highly contagious and pandemic nature of Ebola was exposed in 2014, when an infected US diplomat flew from Liberia to Nigeria, exposing dozens of passerby and doctors along the way. Contact tracing and quarantine can contain an outbreak, but not before lives are lost in the course of getting these procedures in place. An army of contact tracers in Lagos sprung into action and prevented the outbreak from becoming a global catastophe.

Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond | Full Program

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Over the last few decades, diseases that spill over from animals to humans have been on the rise. Learn what's behind the increase, and what we can do to fight these dangerous diseases. Join scientists as they investigate the rise of spillover viruses like Zika, Ebola, and Nipah, and see what scientists are doing to anticipate and prevent epidemics around the world.

Ebola Invades | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 2

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Learn about Ebola, a virus was first recognized in Zaire in 1976, transmitted by person-to-person contact and causing isolated outbreaks. An unexpected and large outbreak occurred in 2014 in West Africa, a region that had not experienced the disease before.

Introduction to an Epidemic | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 1

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Learn about Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that hit Brazil in 2015. Over the last few decades, diseases that spill over from animals to humans have been on the rise. Soon after the onset of Zika, epidemiologists noticed an uptick in the number of babies born with microcephaly, a severe birth defect affecting the head. Were the two related? See how epidemiologists studied the unfolding outbreak to determine Zika's origins, and also to determine if the virus was responsible for the babies born with microcephaly.

Transfusion | Knocking Film Module

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This clip follows the Thomas family as they struggle to obtain a bloodless liver transplant for their son Seth. It examines the complexities of medical decision-making as family and physicians try to follow religious beliefs and save a young man’s life. Medical ethicists reflect on the Witness’s role in obtaining advancements in treatment that may benefit many people.

Seizing Their Stories | Me Facing Life: Cyntoia’s Story Film Module

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In this module, we hear Cyntoia analyze and reflect on her past sexual history and victimization as well as one step she recently took in prison in response to that past.

Welcome to Canada | Global Oneness Project

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Students watch a 19-minute documentary that tells the story of Mohammed Alsaleh, a young Syrian refugee granted asylum in Canada in 2014, who is now counseling newly arrived refugees.

In this lesson, students explore through classroom discussions the themes of cultural displacement, human rights, and resilience. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

My Love, Don't Cross That River | Lesson Plan Clips

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Jin Mo-young’s film My Love, Don't Cross that River documents the final years of a South Korean couple, 89-year-old Kang Gye-Yeol and 98-year-old Jo Byeong-Man, who have been married for 76 years. The film, which follows the couple over 15 months, explores the complex and often challenging experience of growing old and facing death. 

Through Kang Gye-Yeol and Jo Byeong-Man’s story, students will compare traditions, beliefs and rituals across cultures and generations and reflect on their own attitudes toward aging and death.

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