Fine Arts

Fine Arts (X)

Musical Concepts - Violin

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Benjamin Sung is the concertmaster of the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra and has been playing the violin since he was three years old. He enjoys the range of expression that is possible with the violin, a member of the string family, and demonstrates an excerpt from an opera. Mr. Sung also introduces the parts that make up a violin.

Musical Concepts - Viola

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Tim Nelson plays the viola in the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony. In this clip, he explains that he chose the viola at a very young age and has been playing it since orchestra was available in his public school. Because the viola is larger than the violin, the strings are longer and the instrument has a deeper and mellower sound, and to demonstrate, Mr. Nelson plays a short piece by Schubert.

FM Symphony Orchestra Young People's Concert: Introduction to the String Family

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Jane Linde Capistran explains the various instruments in the string family. She has the orchestra demonstrate how the size of the instrument determines the instrument’s pitch.

Dance | What's Good

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Harness the science of movement as you learn about the physics of rotation with break-dancers Tori Torsion, B-Girl Eren and B-Boy Evol; make time to dance, twirl, climb, run, jump, or slide with your kids, as these early experiences with forces and motion will ignite their curiosity and provide a foundation for future science study.

For use at home with your children, see our Science of Movement Lesson Plan!

Chompers | Media Arts Toolkit

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Chompers is a trio of abstract coyotes with levers to lift and lower their heads and open their mouths so that they can appear to be howling at the moon. They were built by the artists at Opera-Matic, a neighborhood art group from Chicago that specializes in community engagement. Opera-Matic was invited to bring Chompers to the BLINK festival in Cincinnati. The BLINK festival was a celebration of light and art with a focus on interactivity. The “coyotes” were a big hit with festival-goers, especially children. They are mounted on recycled ice cream bikes for easy mobility in parades.

Kinetic Kauchii DekoSofa | Media Arts Toolkit

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You may have never thought of pedaling your sofa down the street to visit your neighbors, but that was the idea behind DekoSofa, a kinetic, multimedia sculpture that traveled around BLINK, a festival of art and light held in Cincinnati. Festival-goers were invited to join one of the artists on the three-person mobile sofa, complete with coffee table and chandeliers. The entire rig was decorated with neon lights in the style of Japanese dekotora trucks (decorated trucks) and included a multimedia mural of a creature crawling out of the Chesapeake Bay.

Dance Creation | PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC™

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Dance can take many forms, as Pinkalicious™ and her brother, Peterrific™, discover in this video excerpt from the PBS KIDS series PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC™. Delighted with Robotta, the robot that they have made, Pinkalicious and Peterrific decide to imitate her by matching Robotta's movements. As they sing a song they made up called "I Want to Move Like a Robot," Pinkalicious and Peterrific move their bodies like machines and make up a song about their dance. This resource is part of the PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC™ Collection.

For use in the classroom, see Dance Creation Lesson Plan.

The Pool | Media Arts Toolkit

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The Pool is an interactive light sculpture that creates magic in public spaces by bringing together art, technology, and participation. Consisting of hundreds of circular pads arranged in concentric circles, The Pool invites people to walk, run, jump, and dance on the pads to cause ripples of changing light.

Duke

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This video segment from Weston Woods presents the story of Duke by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney, and is about Duke Ellington, one of the founding fathers of jazz. When Duke Ellington was young, his parents wanted him to learn to play the piano. Although he began lessons, he was soon lured away by his love of baseball. Later, as a teenager he heard the new musical style called "ragtime" and he was inspired once again to learn to play piano. Soon, he created his own style of music using "hops" and "slides" on the piano. He became a popular entertainer with a flair that attracted many fans.

Anansi's Rescue from the River | African/African-American Culture

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In this video, storyteller Nana Yaa Asantewaa performs the story “Anansi’s Rescue from the River.” The Anansi tales are told by the Ashanti people of Ghana, West Africa, and have been passed down through the generations by oral tradition.

Cluck Old Hen/I Had a Rooster | Early America

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Mike Seeger sings two folk songs about animals in traditional Southern style to maintain their distinct flavor. Both feature the banjo, a traditional gourd banjo on “Cluck Old Hen” and today’s steel-string banjo on “I Had a Rooster.” Seeger talks about the gourd banjo’s origins in Africa, discusses how it is made, and compares it to the modern steel banjo.

ZOOM | Kid Musician: Mexico's Guitar Town

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Perfecting the frequency at which a guitar vibrates is important to creating pleasant-sounding guitar music. However, for many, including the boy featured in this ZOOM video segment and the others in his "guitar-crazy" town, guitar music goes beyond simple sound vibrations. Follow along as Andres prepares for the citywide guitar competition and describes the practice and passion behind his beautiful musical performance.

Bubble Prints

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In this video, watch as children make bubble prints with water, a straw and paper. Bubble Prints is a hands-on science exploration for young children and their teachers, parents or caregivers.

Ann Weber: Visual Arts (Sculpture)

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For more than a decade, cardboard has been Ann Weber's material of choice. It's lightweight, plentiful, and free. Armed only with a stapler, Ann has transformed discarded boxes into large-scale sculptures with round, organic forms. She started her career by running a fine porcelain business in New York City where she made plates and bowls. Transitioning from ceramics to working with cardboard has given Ann the freedom to create on a monumental scale. Original air date: April 2003.

Check out the entire collection of KQED SPARK videos here! 

The Problem Solved Song | Peg + Cat

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In this clip that corresponds to the activity Count Your Chickens, Peg and Cat sing a song to celebrate solving the problem.

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