Fine Arts

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X)

The Quilts of Ken Burns in 360° | Nebraska Stories

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Renowned filmmaker Ken Burns has collected quilts since the early 1970’s. In this 360 video from Nebraska Stories, take a virtual tour of an exhibit featuring his unique collection of quilts at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Empowering Girls by Changing Tradition | FILMS BYKIDS

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Learn how girls in a village in Senegal are empowered by their community’s decision to publicly abandon the traditions of female genital cutting and child marriage in this video from FILMS BYKIDS: Walk on my Own. Ndèye Fatou Fall, a 13-year-old filmmaker, tells the story of how she and other girls in her village can walk on their own by continuing their education, exploring new career opportunities, and marrying whom they choose. Support materials are available, including discussion questions and vocabulary.

FILMS BYKIDS pairs master filmmakers with teenagers from around the world to create short personal documentaries that educate Americans as they encourage understanding and engagement about globally relevant issues.

The Juvenile Justice System in the United States | FILMS BYKIDS

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Engage students in a study of the roots of crime among teenagers and solutions beyond incarceration in this video from FILMS BYKIDS: I Could Tell You ‘Bout My Life. Inspired by the “Raise the Age” movement, New York has raised the age of criminal responsibility to 18, no longer prosecuting and incarcerating 16- and 17-year-olds as adults. When Michael Martin got arrested at age 17, this law did not exist. As a result, a judge sentenced him to jail time on Rikers Island. His story is personal, but also reflects the experience of many young people who have found themselves trapped in the juvenile justice system in the United States. Support materials include a background essay, discussion questions, and links to additional classroom resources on the BYkids website.

FILMS BYKIDS pairs master filmmakers with teenagers from around the world to create short personal documentaries that educate Americans as they encourage understanding and engagement about globally relevant issues.

Integrating into a New Culture as a Refugee| FILMS BYKIDS

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Explore the challenges faced by Syrian refugees when settling in a new place in this video from FILMS BYKIDS: Out of Aleppo. Mohammad Shasho is one of the many refugees forced to leave their home in order to escape war and violence in Syria. Mohammad shares how he has worked toward integrating into a new culture in Germany and his aspiration to one day return to his homeland. Support materials include a background essay, discussion questions, and links to additional classroom resources on the Bykids website.

FILMS BYKIDS pairs master filmmakers with teenagers from around the world to create short personal documentaries that educate Americans as they encourage understanding and engagement about globally relevant issues.

 

Music in Arkansas: Origins

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Music in Arkansas: Origins tracks the development of Arkansas's rich musical heritage, beginning with the discovery of a 200 BC Hopewell panpipe and concluding as King Biscuit Time hits the airwaves in 1941 Helena. Origins explores Arkansas's role in the development of fourteen distinct musical genres, as well as how the rich Arkansas soundscape has been influenced by various shifts in culture and by Arkansas's unique geographical regions.

Introduction | Reimagining a Buffalo Landmark

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This segment introduces the Richardson Olmsted Campus, a national historic landmark created and influenced by Frederick Law Olmsted, Henry Hobson Richardson and Thomas Story Kirkbride. It took decades to build and served as the Buffalo State Asylum with a revolutionary model for treatment of people with mental illness. After decades of neglect, the campus is now being reimagined by a community dedicated to preserving it.

A Bird's Eye View | Reimagining a Buffalo Landmark

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Enjoy drone footage of the extensive Richardson Olmsted Campus in Buffalo, New York. The campus was developed by H.H. Richardson, Thomas Story Kirkbride, and Frederick Law Olmsted. Construction began in 1872, as the Buffalo State Asylum, and took decades to complete.

How Circus Bands Spread African American Music | The Circus

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Discover how cornet player and bandleader P. G. Lowery helped bring the music of black musicians into mainstream popular culture in the early 20th century, in this digital video from The Circus: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Lowery, who grew up in a musical family, trained at the prestigious Boston Conservatory of Music. At a time when American society limited opportunities for blacks, the traveling circus provided Lowery and other black musicians with better treatment and guaranteed pay.

Dream Land | Little Rock's West 9th Street

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Little Rock, Arkansas's West 9th Street was once a vibrant, African-American business and entertainment district. Taborian Hall is the only remaining historic structure on West 9th Street and stands as a living witness of the street's former glory days. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, Taborian Hall housed varied and important black businesses, including professional offices, a USO, the Gem Pharmacy and the Dreamland Ballroom. By the 1930s, Dreamland was firmly established as a stop on the "Chitlin Circuit," which showcased regional and national African-American bands and stage shows. It was also host to local musicians, dances, socials, concerts and sporting events. 

This documentary seeks to recognize, memorialize and share this history. The spirit and hard work of the people and the implications of federal programs such as Urban Renewal, school desegregation, the Housing Act of 1949 and the Eisenhower Interstate Program are explored. West 9th Street and the Dreamland Ballroom have patiently waited for their story to unfold so new audiences can connect to their historical past and unknown future. 

Major funding for the film was provided by the Arkansas Humanities Council and The Moving Image Trust Fund. 

In 2018, "Dreamland: Little Rock's West 9th Street" received a Bronze Documentary Telly Award.

For further information on Dream Land: Little Rock's West 9th Street, please visit AETN's Dream Land Webpage

Graven Image | Short Film

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Using over 100 years of archival footage, director Sierra Pettengill explores the history of the largest Confederate monument: Georgia’s Stone Mountain.

Reconstruction: The Birth of a Nation - Rewriting History through Propaganda

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The Birth of a Nation was a 1915 silent film, directed by D.W. Griffith, fictionalizing the history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. At the time of its release, it was considered a pioneering artistic achievement in the history of cinema. But, in reality, it was a racist piece of “Lost Cause” propaganda, seeking to transform the Ku Klux Klan from terrorists into heroic vigilantes who rescued the South from uncivilized blacks. 

This film rewrote the history of Reconstruction, seeking to redeem the South and erase the positive contributions and progress that African Americans had made. African American men are vilified and shown as vengeful former slaves, while the Ku Klux Klan is celebrated as protecting the country from the perils of racial equality. Not only was this portrayal untrue, it was the opposite of what actually happened. During Reconstruction, the Klan terrorized and assaulted countless numbers of African Americans in order to intimidate them from exercising their basic rights, including voting. 

The NAACP, founded in 1909, strongly opposed the film and even sought to have it banned. But their protests were not successful. The film screened widely, even at the White House for President Woodrow Wilson. Not long after the film's release, the KKK was reborn. 

During the 20th century, many Americans learned about Reconstruction through the distorted viewpoint in films like The Birth of a Nation. The film is considered the greatest blockbuster of the silent film era. Thomas Dixon, who wrote the book The Clansman, on which The Birth of a Nation was based, reveled in its success. "The real purpose of my film was to revolutionize Northern audiences that would transform every man into a Southern partisan for life."

306 Hollywood | Lesson Plan Clips

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“Archaeology is the study of past cultures through the material (physical) remains people left behind.” (archaeological.org) Artifacts uncovered by archaeologists inform the narratives of history studied by every student in today’s schools. This lesson invites students to wonder about how scientists travel the path from a random item left behind to conclusions about how people lived or what they believed. Using the film 306 Hollywood as a model, students will be asked to create “catalogs” of “artifacts” representing their own lives or communities.

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