Elementary

Computer Science (X) - Elementary (X)

Water: The Lifeblood | Coal as a Water Source?

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Coal Creek Station near Underwood, North Dakota is able to remove the water from the lignite they mine and then use that water in their cooling towers. They have also been able to see an increase in the plant’s efficiency by doing this. 

Water: The Lifeblood | Collaboration Between Cities and Industry to Share Water

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Once the water is used by a city, the water must be treated before it goes back into the river because that water will move downstream to another city. The city of Mankato, Minnesota partnered with Calpine (an electric utility) to meet local environmental and energy needs. 

Water: The Lifeblood | History of Energy is the Story of Water

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As a civilization, people have been using water to provide energy in turning wheels, making steam, and in turbines. 

Cynthia - Journeyman Carpenter

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Working in the construction industry, Cynthia has built a satisfying career and a lasting legacy.

This video is part of the series SciGirls Profiles: Women in STEM, which includes 12 role model videos of women who are passionate about their STEM work, hobbies, families and making the world a better place. These videos introduce students to women working in traditionally male STEM occupations, and inspire them around career exploration in fields like technology, engineering, manufacturing and trades.  Each video provides explicit strategies for overcoming barriers and finding success and joy in jobs where women are heavily underrepresented.

Dr. Bridgette Shannon – Chemist

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Bridgette’s formula for success is using her love of chemistry to develop groundbreaking products at work and create natural remedies for her family at home.

This video is part of the series SciGirls Profiles: Women in STEM, which includes 12 role model videos of women who are passionate about their STEM work, hobbies, families and making the world a better place. These videos introduce students to women working in traditionally male STEM occupations, and inspire them around career exploration in fields like technology, engineering, manufacturing and trades.  Each video provides explicit strategies for overcoming barriers and finding success and joy in jobs where women are heavily underrepresented.

JoNette Kuhnau – Traffic Engineer

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Jonette grew up far from city streets, but she’s driven to improve the way that urban transportation flows.

This video is part of the series SciGirls Profiles: Women in STEM, which includes 12 role model videos of women who are passionate about their STEM work, hobbies, families and making the world a better place. These videos introduce students to women working in traditionally male STEM occupations, and inspire them around career exploration in fields like technology, engineering, manufacturing and trades.  Each video provides explicit strategies for overcoming barriers and finding success and joy in jobs where women are heavily underrepresented.

Inventions and Science: Movable Type | The Story of China

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Learn about the early practices of printing in China during the Tang and Song dynasties with this clip from The Story of China. Books were primarily published with woodblocks, with entire pages carved into separate pieces of wood. The Chinese first invented movable type during the Song Dynasty, but the complexity of the Chinese language made it cumbersome and not cost efficient. However, publishers continued to use woodblocks.

STEM Pro Live!

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By the end of 8th grade most students have made up their minds about liking math & science. 

They've already decided if they're going to dig in and pursue higher level math & science. A big reason students choose math & science is the role models they have in their lives. Seeing a STEM professional use math and science to do innovative—and downright cool—things can inspire students to engage in science and math.

The Maricopa County Education Service Agency invites all middle school classrooms to tune in and meet one of our STEM professional role models!

HADES Expedition

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The HADES Expedition seeks to learn what lives in the deep sea and how the ecosystem is organized. Join the team as they discover the bioorganisms, sediment, and topography of the deep ocean. 

Wilbur and Orville Wright: The Process of Invention | STEM in 30

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Before they built airplanes, the Wright brothers built bicycles. This episode of STEM in 30 will be broadcast live from inside the Wright brothers’ bicycle shop at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan.  We’ll take a look at their workshop and see how their fascination with solving the problem of human flight led to the invention of the airplane.

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird | STEM in 30

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Built of titanium, the SR-71 Blackbird is the world's fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird's performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War. In this episode of STEM in 30 we’ll feature the SR-71 Blackbird on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center and explore why it was so important for reconnaissance.

3-D Printing Prosthetics Process | Move to Include

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Learn how 3-D printing has created a worldwide community of volunteers to design and print prosthetics for those with physical disabilities and provide them at little or no cost. Professor Jon Schull of Rochester Institute of Technology explains the work & RIT's part in the e-nable project. Find out how the kids that need the prosthetic help in the engineering design process.

Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Mobile Pediatric Stander Benefits Children | Move to Include

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Learn about the benefits of a mobile pediatric stander for children as an adaptive technology developed by Rochester Institute of Technology's Mechanical Engineering Program in partnership with an integrated preschool run by CP Rochester.

Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

John Gabaldon, Industrial Waste Systems Engineer

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John Gabaldon is an Industrial Waste Systems Engineer at Intel Corporation. He answers the question "Why did you become a scientist?"

 

Dr. Andrea Mammoli, Mechanical Engineer

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Dr. Andrea Mammoli from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of New Mexico answers the question "Why did you become a scientist?"

 

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