Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X)

Booker T. Washington | Orator, Teacher, and Advisor Video

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Freed from the bonds of slavery by the Emancipation Proclamation, Booker T. Washington worked relentlessly to become a teacher, an accomplished orator, and an advisor to two Presidents. He was considered a hero in the late 1800s, although some opposed his philosophy that equality and respect must be patiently earned. Through two primary source activities and watching a short video, students will learn about Booker T. Washington’s commitment to African American education, and assess his ideas about how to achieve equality for African Americans in the years after the Civil War.

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Jackie Robinson | Athlete and Activist Video

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Jackie Robinson was a sports hero who became a civil rights activist. When Jackie Robinson took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, he became the first African American to play Major League Baseball in the modern era. Demonstrating skill as a professional baseball player and consistent dignity both on and off the field, Robinson became an advocate for civil rights, as well as a role model. This video is a part of a lesson plan including two primary source activities and a short video below: understand how Robinson rose to prominence, and explore the importance of courage in his life.

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Simeon Benjamin

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Simeon Benjamin was born on Long Island in 1792. He moved to Elmira, NY and began investing his hard-earned fortune in this growing community. He believed that women deserved an equal chance at higher education, and used his influence and financial backing to locate the new female college. He donated nearly $80,000 to the school helping to keep tuition low and the doors open during hard times.

Queen Catharine Montour

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Catharine was the great-granddaughter or a French settler and a Huron woman. She married Seneca Indian Chief Telenemut and assumed leadership of She-que-ga village and its Seneca people after his death. Present-day Montour Falls was named by the white settlers in her honor.

West Virginia History in 10 Seconds l Minnie B. Harper

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Learn about the political career of Minnie B. Harper

Sitting Bull | Spiritual Leader and Military Leader Video

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Over the course of the 19th Century, white settlers moved westward, and the US Government brokered treaties with Native Americans and often resorted to using military force to claim land for the United States. To this day, Sitting Bull—spiritual and military leader of the Lakota tribe—is remembered as the Native American chief who took the greatest stand against the US government. Through two primary source activities and a short biographical video, students will understand the remarkable courage of this leader who stood up for his people.

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The West Virginia State Museum

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Explore the West Virginia State Museum and learn about the role of a museum director.

The West Virginia Division of Archives and History

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Learn about the work of an archivist and explore the types of artifacts, documents, and other methods they use to preserve West Virginia history.

Brattonsville: Choosing Sides | The Southern Campaign

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After the crushing defeat at Waxhaws, the people of the South Carolina backcountry had a decision to make.  Were they “Tories”—loyal to the crown; or would they become “Whigs” or “partisans” and fight the British invaders? 

General Thomas Sumter gathered militia troops in South Carolina. Militia units consisted of “civilian” farmers and sometimes included Catawba Indians and slaves. The American militia and partisans couldn’t just line up and take on the British. The British forces were too well-trained and disciplined. The Americans had to whittle away at the enemy, strike their supply lines—fight dozens of little battles, rather than one big battle. This strategy became known as “guerrilla warfare.”

In June 1780, the British had established an "outpost" at Rocky Mount, in the Catawba Valley. Lieutenant Colonel George Turnbull sent troops into what are now York and Chester counties to round up and eliminate the rebels. Captain Christian Huck, a loyalist from Philadelphia, was the leader.

In the community of Brattonsville, Martha Bratton sent a message to warn her husband, Colonel William Bratton, that Captain Huck was on his way. The message was delivered by Watt, the family’s African-American slave.

On July 12, 1780, the Patriot militia, led by Colonel Bratton, defeated the British Legion. This battle became known as the "Battle at Williamson's Plantation" or "Huck's Defeat."

Camden: Defeat and Destruction | The Southern Campaign

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On August 16, 1780, General Horatio Gates' army, joined by militia men from North Carolina and Virginia, marched south toward the British outpost in Camden, South Carolina. At the same time, Lt General Charles Earl Cornwallis's army headed north. The cavalries clashed in a battle that became known as the Battle of Camden, the largest battle in the South up to that point.

Musgrove Mill: Ray of Hope | The Southern Campaign

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August 19th 1780, three days after the Battle of Camden, another battle was fought. British Provincials from Ninety-Six were camped near Edward Musgrove’s grist mill on the Enoree River (Laurens County), with many recuperating from wounds received at the Battle of Cedar Springs.

Funding and support for the production is provided by The National Park Service, The Self Family Foundation, The George Washington Endowment Fund of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, The South Carolina State Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and a contribution from Dr. Charles B. Hanna.

VietNomz l Vietnamese Orlando

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New Country, New Culture! Central Florida embraced immigrants fleeing Vietnam after the war. Learn how Philip Nguyen and his family have bridged Vietnamese cuisine into the heart of Orlando.

Orlando Greenwood Cemetery | Central Florida Roadtrip

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You can literally take a walk through Orlando history with a visit to Greenwood Cemetery.  It is the only cemetery in the city limits of Orlando, and is home to almost all of the city’s forefathers.

Sanford Mayfair Inn l Central Florida Roadtrip

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During the time The New York Giants ran the Mayfair Inn, they also ran the golf course which later became the Mayfair Country Club and Golf Course. During the late 1950’s, PGA tour events were held here, and Arnold Palmer got his first check as a pro golfer at the Mayfair.

The Cherokee Alphabet

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Learn about the story of Sequoyah, a Cherokee man who developed an alphabet for the Cherokee language in 1821, in this video segment adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: “We Shall Remain.” Like most Native American groups at the time, the Cherokees did not have a written language. Sequoyah’s alphabet helped preserve the Cherokee language and Cherokee culture, especially after the Cherokees were forced to leave their native land by the 1830 Indian Removal Act.

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