Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Elementary (X) - High (X) - U.S. History (X)

Freedom of Conscience | Dutch New York

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This segment from Dutch New York describes the experiences of both the Sephardic Jews and the Quakers as they settled in New Amsterdam in search of religious freedom. The director of New Netherland colony, Peter Stuyvesant, was not initially welcoming of the Jews and the Quakers, but ultimately was advised by his superiors in Amsterdam to allow people of all faiths to practice their religion. This video also describes how the Quakers drafted a list of grievances, later called The Flushing Remonstrance, which is one of the roots of religious freedom in America.

A Language Immersion Story

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Moises, a fictional young Spanish-speaking immigrant, faces conflicts in his English-immersion school in the United States in this video from Media That Matters: Immersion. Moises understands math concepts well, but his limited English means he does not have the vocabulary to understand the language of story problems. He struggles, along with his math teacher, to prepare for two weeks of standardized math testing.

The Effects of the Columbian Exchange

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the Columbian Exchange, the movement of plants, animals, and disease between the Americas and the rest of the world, in these video segments from Chronoscope: Exploring 1492: “Columbian Exchange." The positive and negative consequences of the Exchange became clear almost immediately. People on both sides reveled in new foods and animals that made their lives richer and easier, but suffered as well when old ways of life were disrupted.

Pocahontas Revealed

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment adapted from NOVA tells a historical version of what may have happened when John Smith was captured by the Powhatan people, and then was rescued by Native American princess Pocahontas. Although one of Smith's later accounts of the event introduced the now popular belief that Pocahontas rescued Smith for romantic love, historians also look to his earlier, different account to try to determine what really happened. One version that some historians believe may be closer to the truth is that Pocahontas was playing her appointed role in an adoption ritual. When she "rescued" Smith, she was actually adopting him into the tribe as her brother and Chief Powhatan's son.

Building, Structure, and Property Research | History Detectives

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Ten million American service men and women came home at the close of WWII, eager to turn their energies from fighting to building a modern postwar nation. An emerging network of interstate highways would encourage a new scale of housing in large new suburbs, places like Levittown, New York, where the company’s factory produced one four room house every 16 minutes in 1950. The Depression, followed by the war years, had left the nation with a critical housing shortage. Where would the army of returning GI’s live? History Detectives investigates a discovery which may offer a unique look at how necessity became the mother of invention in postwar America. Has a boxcar been used to build a couple's Lakewood home?

World War II: Activity Pack | History Detectives

Icon: 
Streaming icon

World War II was fought in the form of physical battles as well as psychological warfare. The surviving artifacts from the front lines of these struggles provide a window onto how World War II was waged. These lesson plans and videos are based on History Detectives episodes that examine how several objects played a key role in World War II, particularly the role of Japan and the Japanese in the war. They offer students opportunities to research and write about Japanese internment camps, the air war, and propaganda.

Civil War | History Detectives

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The Civil War (1861-1865) is America’s bloodiest war to date. It cost close to 1,100,000 casualties and claimed over 620,000 lives. These lesson plans and videos are based on History Detectives episodes that examine a variety of artifacts—a weapon, an early photograph, a letter, a piece of pottery—highlighting African-American involvement in the Civil War. They offer students opportunities to research and create paper or interactive biographical posters, delve into the intersection of military and social history, and survey slave art and culture.

Atomic Bomb: Donald Smith

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Donald Smith recalls propaganda during World War II in this video teaching module from the KACV's local perspective on "The War,"

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Propaganda: Wilma Clark

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video teaching module from the KACV's local perspective on "The War," Wilma Clark talks about growing up during the Dust Bowl, Great Depression, and World War II. Clark remembers the reactions of citizens to the attacks on Pearl Harbor and how many Japanese-American citizens living in California were forced to live in internment camps.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Dust Bowl: Earl Stagner's Memories

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Students will investigate the experiences of those that lived through the dust bowl with this video teaching module from the KACV's local perspective on "The Dust Bowl." Understand the mindset of the dust bowl survivors through this interview with Stagner, who talks about his memories of the days of dust.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Miller: Dealing with Dirt

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Students will investigate the experiences of those that lived through the Dust Bowl with this video teaching module from the KACV's local perspective on "The Dust Bowl." In this interview, understand the mindset of the Dust Bowl survivors through Genevieve Miller,  who discusses how they would deal with the dirt.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Propaganda: Helen Neal

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Helen Neal talks about moving to Wichita, Kansas during World War II for work in this video teaching module from the KACV's local perspective on "The War." She also recalls the Victory Gardens, which citizens were encouraged to have and watching the news reels at the theatre.

Battle of the Bulge: J. W. Armstrong

Icon: 
Streaming icon

J.W. Armstrong talks about being one of many Americans fighting during the Battle of the Bulge in this video teaching module from the KACV's local perspective on"The War".  This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

37 Weeks: Sherman On The March - Week 04

Icon: 
Streaming icon

It is mid-May, 1864. Johnston’s army is entrenched at Resaca, protecting the railroad from Union troops. Having failed at Dalton, Sherman launches his attacks. Union Colonel Benjamin Harrison’s troops capture a fort with cannons. Both armies compete for ownership; the Union prevails. Nearly trapped again by Sherman’s army, Johnston retreats south. Sherman nears Atlanta as residents grow anxious.

37 Weeks: Sherman On The March - Week 05

Icon: 
Streaming icon

It is the third week of May, 1864. Fifty miles from the city, Sherman’s men fan out across hills south of the Oostanaula. Near Cassville, Confederate General Johnston spies an opportunity to destroy an isolated column of Sherman’s army. But it never happens: Johnston finds Union soldiers on his flank. Johnston retreats south as the city readies for attack, Sherman now only thirty miles from Atlanta.

Pages