Science

Science (X) - Geography (X)

Harvesting Herring Eggs | EARTH A New Wild

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Using a method that goes back generations, fishermen in Alaska use an entirely natural method to harvest eggs from spawning herring. Use this resource to teach about sustainable farming and customs indigenous to Alaska and Canada.

Animals, Maps, and Habitats, Oh My!

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In this STEM activity from Cyberchase, students watch a video in which a habitat has been disturbed by the construction of a bike path. They then use x and y coordinates to locate items on a map and find a solution to the problem posed in the video.

Extend the learning with the related Cyberchase at-home activity Habitat Mapping Game.

Why Does Climate Change Matter?

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In this video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College, hear young Native Americans talk about climate change. Listen as they respond to the question, "Why does climate change matter?" They share their opinions about the importance of climate; their thoughts on how climate change is affecting weather, oceans, and ice; and their fears about the impacts for future generations.

A History of Colonization | Children of the Amazon: Part 5

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Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home. This excerpt deals with the incursion of the outside world into the people who lived in the forest, starting in 1907.

Contact, Disease, and Change | Children of the Amazon: Part 6

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Learn how infectious diseases impacted the Surui tribe after first contact in 1969 with colonizers and how this struggling community coped with the death and loss that followed. Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home by an outside world.

Red River Divide | Flooding

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Learn about the history and geology of the Red River of the North and the surrounding plains, including glacial Lake Agassiz, the many floods in recorded history, and disaster relief and protection in the past. Government leaders who with dealt with the 1997 flood talk about its lasting impact and the real possibility of another flood as bad or even worse in the future.

Ecotourism | Tourism in North Dakota

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Learn how ecotourism, or adventure tourism, is the new trend in vacationing. North Dakota is working to attract visitors to its wide open spaces and to encourage them to interact with North Dakotans in their everyday and recreational activities.

Underwater Lakes | Ocean Today

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The seafloor is not just flat. In fact, it includes many of the landscape features that you see on land: hills, mountains, valleys and even rivers and lakes! Underwater lakes and rivers form on the bottom of the ocean when seawater seeps up from the seafloor, dissolves the salt layer around it, and collects in the resulting depressions. Incredibly, these underwater lakes and rivers have shorelines, surfaces, and even waves! Masses of mussels line the edges of some of these lakes. The mussels have adaptations that allow them to get their nutrients from bacteria that generate energy from chemicals in the water rather than sunlight, since there isn't any. Lakes deep within the ocean and the kinds of life that thrive there are just a few of the fascinating features of the seafloor.

The Coastal Zone: Santee Delta (00:03:47)

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The Student Host takes a boat ride with a geologist from the South Carolina Coastal Council. They travel from a landing where U.S. Highway 17 crosses the Norlh Santee River, through the delta to the Atlantic Ocean.

Earth System: Drought and Air Quality

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Droughts claim more victims each year than any other natural disaster. Depending on where it occurs and how long it persists, the cost of a drought can run into the billions of dollars. Droughts cause more than economic hardship, however. As this video segment adapted from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center demonstrates, droughts have a complex web of impacts that also affect us socially and environmentally.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Navajo Elders' Observations on Climate Change

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In this video segment adapted from Navajo Technical College, two Navajo Elders speak about climate change and the differences in the environment that they have observed. They have noticed changes in the rainy season, including more violent storms, and changes in the characteristics of both wind and snow. They describe the disappearance of some plants during their lifetime and express concern about how changes in climate are negatively affecting people and animals.

Observing Changes in Snowfall

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In this video segment adapted from the College of Menominee Nation, Menominee language instructor John Teller describes the implications of climate change on the Menominee Indian Tribe, whose reservation is located in northeast Wisconsin. Teller has observed changing conditions, including snowfall that arrives later in the year. He describes how the snow and cold weather are connected both to the customs and the well-being of the Menominee Nation. Because of this, he says, the tribe must do something to protect the Earth.

Central Utah Project (Part Three) | Images of Utah

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Learn about the significance of the Central Utah Project, a water resource and electric energy development project in the central and east central part of Utah. This video is extracted from the 22-part video series The Geography of Utah, conceived and written by Albert L. Fisher, PhD of the University of Utah. The series encompasses the political, cultural, historical and sociological geography of the state of Utah. It describes the activities, the land, and the people. Much of the video material was videotaped on location throughout the state of Utah, giving the student and interested viewer valuable field trip experiences.

A Return to the Amazon | Children of the Amazon: Parts 1, 2

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Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home by an outside world. From Chief Amir Surui's embattled efforts to stop illegal loggers to the assassination of legendary rubber tapper Chico Mendes, this poetic and visually stunning film engages our senses and sympathies as global issues take on a profound human perspective.

A Rubber Tapping Invasion | Children of the Amazon: Part 4

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Rubber tapping used to be a sustainable process at the turn of the century, but the growth of industry and outside culture in the forest seeded conflict between rubber barons and the indigenous communities. Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home by an outside world.

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