Elementary

Social Studies (X) - Computer Science (X) - Elementary (X)

Faces of the Oil Patch | Pudge Brewster

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Learn about Pudge Brewster who moved to North Dakota after working an oil boom in Colorado. His company began by hauling equipment to the Williston area and has since contracted with companies to haul gravel.

The Garden (Clip 3) | Exploring Monticello

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In this segment of Exploring Monticello, we learn about Jefferson's vast garden where he experimented with growing many different varieties of vegetables.

Exploring Monticello takes students into Thomas Jefferson’s home, a virtual laboratory for all kinds of ideas. Thomas Jefferson is best known for authoring the Declaration of Independence and becoming the third President of the United States, but he also had a great love for innovations which made him one of America’s first great scientists.  This LIVE interactive streaming field trip gives students the opportunity to experience scientific discovery within the context of history, and to consider the creative process inherent in making something new and innovative.

WWII and the Tuskegee Airmen | STEM in 30

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Before 1941, there weren’t any African American pilots in the United States armed forces. The Tuskegee Airmen changed that. With the United States’ entry into World War II imminent, the U.S. Army Air Corps (the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force) decided to offer training to African Americans as pilots and mechanics. Called the Tuskegee Airmen because they trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American military. This episode of STEM in 30 will look at the role African Americans played during the war and how World War II changed aviation history.

Milestones of Flight: The Lindberghs | STEM in 30

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Charles Lindbergh is probably best known for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. However, Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, also reached other milestones in aviation. In 1929 they purchased a Lockheed Sirius airplane and flew it to Asia, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the north. During a trip through Greenland, a native boy gave the Sirius its nickname: Tingmissartoq, meaning "one who flies like a big bird.” This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the Lindberghs' aviation-related accomplishments.

ISS Anniversary | STEM in 30

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In the lifetime of today’s middle school students, there hasn’t been a day without a human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS). This episode of STEM in 30 celebrates the 15th anniversary of continuous occupation of the space station and looks at the incredible accomplishments of the last 15 years.

Trading Bows and Arrows for Laptops

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Learn about a unique collaboration between the Surui tribe and Google Earth Outreach. The partnership, a result of Chief Almir Surui’s request that Google help raise visibility for his tribe, involves training the Surui people to use Internet technology to protect their forest, preserve their culture, and empower their people. Support Materials include a lesson guide and student handout.

Trading Bows and Arrows for Laptops: Carbon and Culture

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Since Chief Almir first contacted Google five years ago, their partnership has flourished. The Surui have created a cultural map in Google Earth to preserve their knowledge of their territory including plants, animals, and historic sites. They are also using Android devices equiped with ODK (Open Data Kit) to monitor illegal logging and measure the biodiversity and carbon stocks of their forest. Support Materials include a lesson guide and student handout.

Piracy or Defending | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how history is in the eye of the beholder and Americans traditionally see their economic successes as progress in this video from the Steamboat on the Red series. In the case of the steamboats, however, the Chippewa people saw the Americans as rude and in violation of international law. When the Native people attempted to enforce their land rights, they were seen as pirates in the eyes of Americans.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

E-Business | Web Security

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Learn about the importance of web security which becomes top priority with more information changing hands electronically.

E-Business | Jeffrey Bezos

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Hear about the flexibility of the internet and its shaping by new technologies and decreasing costs in these early years of development, from Jeffrey Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon.com. The rise of the Internet has provided a new market for North Dakota businesses. With shopping at a store now being as easy as typing in a web address, distance from consumers is becoming less of an issue in the business world.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kathleen Enders

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Learn why Kathleen Enders of Tioga, North Dakota, views all the change in her small town as an exciting opportunity for Tioga to grow. “Our town would die and become a ghost town if we didn’t have the change.”

Faces of the Oil Patch | Triple R Transport

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Hear the owners of Triple R Transport of Williston who have found that working within city ordinances to rezone land for their business can be frustrating and time consuming. Prior to obtaining the correct permits, they parked their trucks on their land and angered locals, but as one of the interviewees puts it, "Us being able to be here takes fifteen trucks out of the parking lot of the Wal-Mart."

John Ochsendorf, Structural Engineer

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The life and career of MIT structural engineering professor John Ochsendorf is profiled in this program from the Inspiring West Virginians series.  Lesson plans for science and social studies are included.

Edison: Invention Laboratory at Menlo Park

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Discover how Thomas Edison’s invention laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, and the team he hired to work with him, all fit into his vision of how he would become a great inventor in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. In late 1876, Edison opened a fully equipped 5,000 square foot innovation laboratory that would provide him and a small group of experimental assistants and skilled machinists a place to invent. With all kinds of chemicals, organic materials, scientific instruments, and shop tools available to them, the men worked day and night, intent on figuring out things that nobody had yet thought of. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison Collection.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Transcript

Edison: From the Telephone and Telegraph Comes the Phonograph

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Discover how one invention led to another when Thomas Edison and his Menlo Park laboratory team refined Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone and, along the way, invented the phonograph, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. Bell unveiled the telephone in the spring of 1876, prompting Edison and his team to design a device that improved on it. Then, calling on his experience as a telegrapher, Edison experimented on a device capable of recording the human voice: a phonograph. The invention was truly groundbreaking. Until then, no one had ever played back recorded sound. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison CollectionNote: The word "damn" is stated in the video.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout and a tanscript for this resource.

Student Handout | Transcript

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