Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X) - Economics (X)

The West Virginia Turnpike

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Explore the impact of the WV turnpike on the economy of West Virginia.

Experiment Highlights Effects of Poor Neighborhoods

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Hear about the factors that contribute to upward mobility with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 1, 2015.

Race Riot of 1906 | Georgia Stories

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How can we avoid repeating our past mistakes? One of the best ways is to understand what happened and why it happened so we can avoid doing the same thing in the future. One such event in Georgia's past was the race riot of 1906. As economic conditions worsened after the Civil War, poor whites joined blacks moving to Atlanta where both groups competed for work. In mid-September, a riot started in Atlanta when violent mobs of whites began randomly attacking black men, beating and killing them.

219: Modern Georgia, Part VII | Georgia Stories

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Modern Georgia is constantly finding ways to improve the way of life of its citizens. For some, that means homes built by Habitat for Humanity, which was started in Georgia. For others, it means developing recycling programs to ensure the continued health of the state. It could even mean starting a farm to provide ostrich and emu meat.

Mercantilism | Georgia Stories

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Georgia products travel and are used around the world. Ships bring in containers loaded with goods from blue jeans to televisions. According to David Schaller of the Georgia Ports Authority, in one year these containers lined up end to end would stretch from Savannah to Los Angeles. The 4.5 million tons of cargo that enter the port is distributed to consumers via highways and railways.

New Teachers Face Increasing Instability

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Find out why finding a job as a teacher is harder than ever with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from July 22, 2015.

The Causes of the 2008 Financial Crisis

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The new Wall Street practice of dispersing credit risk among multiple financial institutions, which led to the financial crises of 2008, is the focus of this video segment adapted from FRONTLINE: "Money, Power and Wall Street." Typically, when a bank makes a loan, it needs to set aside reserves of capital for that loan. However, Wall Street bank JP Morgan found a London bank, EBRD, to take on its loan risk. This allowed EBRD to get compensated for taking on the risk while JP Morgan was free to do more business with its available capital. Other banks followed suit, and, in this way, risk was dispersed across financial institutions worldwide and a new financial market was born. However, a wave of lending abuses in the mortgage industry and the reality that the risk still remained within the banking system, no matter where it was moved, ultimately led to the failure of a bank in Germany, followed by the failure of the U.S. bank Bear Stearns, and the start of the 2008 financial crisis. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE collection.

Tough Job Market Hurting Older Workers

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NewsHour Economics Correspondent Paul Solman looks at the challenges older workers face trying to secure a job, let alone retire, amid the downturn.

Newspapers in the Digital Age

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the.News reporter Antonio Neves explores changes in the newspaper business. He investigates how stories are covered and delivered and what changes in economic models are necessary to secure newspapers' continued existence. Explore how the newspaper industry has adapted to stay relevant within the Digital Age by becoming information portals and utilizing social media.

Poverty Rates Surge in American Suburbs

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on January 13, 2014.

When President Johnson declared a "War on Poverty" fifty years ago, images of the American poor focused on the inner-city and rural poor. What is the state of American poverty today? Megan Thompson reports on the less visible but growing number of poor in America's suburbs.

205: The Westward Movement, Part I | Georgia Stories

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Georgia's economic development was quickly advanced by a gold rush during the 1830s. The first segment of this episode discusses the discovery and methods of that gold rush. The second briefly touches on the modern types of currency, but primarily focuses on the need and use of a local mint for the 1830s gold miners. The episode concludes by explaining how the gold rush led to greater demand for land in Georgia, demand that lead to multiple Native American tribes being sent on the Trail of Tears.

207: The Civil War, Part I | Georgia Stories

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The Civil War was fought as much with money and morale as it was fought with weapons. The Confederacy had so little to pay its troops that, come pay day, the soldiers would often walk away with little to no money. Added to those struggles was the Northern blockade of Savannah and the South's inability to engage in international trade. Even if the Confederacy had been able to get goods out, few would have wanted to trade with them and support the war. Many Europeans, like Fanny Kemble, actively opposed slavery and wanted it to end.

114: Rise of Modern Georgia, Part III | Georgia Stories

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This episode shows some of the different roles children have played in Georgia throughout the years. The first segment discusses the importance of children on Georgia's farms, the only type of work that is able to get around the state's child labor laws. The second segment discusses child laborers in textiles factories during the Industrial Revolution. The last segment shows a different perspective on the role of children, the founding of the Girl Scouts of America.

The Tufted Bedspread Industry | Georgia Stories

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The multi-billion dollar carpet industry of Dalton, Georgia had humble origins. In 1893, 15 year-old Catherine Evans created her first tufted bedspread. By the 1920's, the production of tufted spreads had blossomed into a "cottage industry." Cotton mills produced the raw materials, and "haulers" served as middlemen between the mills, the spread makers, and the merchants. Highway 41 became known as "Bedspread Alley" for its proliferation of merchants.

Technology & Innovation | Segment 1

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In 1931, Watson laid out expansion plans that included a research center and training/sales school. This marked one of his greatest contributions to the growth of IBM and the information technology industry.

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