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What Other Countries Can Teach Us About Good Schools

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on September 25, 2013.

Despite increases in education spending and a decade of school reform, students in the United States still lag behind their peers in many other countries when it comes to math, science and reading skills.

High School Football Players Discuss the Pressure to Stay in the Game, Despite Concussions

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Explore why, despite reports on the dangers of concussions, high school athletes feel pressured to hide their injuries in order to get back in the game with this video fromPBS NewsHourvideo from February 17th, 2014. According to the National Academy of Sciences, there are 11 recorded concussions for every 10,000 high school games and practices, twice the rate of college players. But researchers believe the number is actually much higher because many go unreported.

70 Years After Nuclear Test, New Mexico Town Fights for Compensation

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Listen to residents of a New Mexico town talk about their concerns over exposure to nuclear radiation with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from July 28, 2015.

Lillian Gordy Carter | Georgia Stories

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The mother of a president and a formidable leader in her own right, Lillian Gordy Carter set an example for all women with her determination to make the world a better place. Whether it was by serving as a nurse in the Peace Corps in India, or bridging cultural gaps in rural Georgia, her nursing skills and her compassion endeared her to many.

Mary Francis Hill Coley | Georgia Stories

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Mary Francis Hill Coley became a renowned Georgia midwife who delivered thousands of babies during her life. She was born in a Georgia where women were often treated as less than equal citizens, and where, for poor and black women, the struggle was compounded. With little, if any, formal schooling, she became an accomplished and recognized midwife, an advocate for health care who saw no racial barriers, as documented in the award winning film, "All My Babies," in 1952.

Film Clip 2 | Mimi and Dona

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In this clip, Mimi and Dona share a tender moment as they awkwardly stumble through the Lord's Prayer before bed on the night before Dona is scheduled to move out.

Basic Black - Andre Slay: Amputee, Pilot, and Marathoner

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Learn about Andre Slay's third full marathon despite having lost his right leg in a motorcycle accident several years ago, in this video from Basic Black: Black Perspectives Now.

Does Trump’s School Safety Plan Make Schools Safer? | PBS NewsHour

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On March 11, 2018, President Donald Trump shared his school safety plan, which includes arming teachers, expanding mental health, and improving the National Instant Criminal Background System. The plan does not endorse expanding background checks. Trump backpedaled on his support for raising the minimum age to buy assault weapons, and the proposed program is being criticized for not going far enough to address the problem of gun violence. Arming teachers could make schools less safe, given accuracy problems and the potential to draw more shooters to schools.

March 14, 2018 videos and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Constitution USA | Created Equal

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Peter Sagal explores the high ideals of the Declaration of Independence that “all men are created equal,” endowed with “inalienable rights,” that didn’t make it into the Constitution in 1787. The Fourteenth Amendment tries to incorporate the words of the Declaration into the Constitution. The far-reaching changes created by that amendment established new notions of citizenship, equal protection, due process, and personal liberty and today those notions are being used to fight for same sex marriage, voting rights, affirmative action, and immigration reform. 

Media Literacy | the.News

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Listen as Antonio Neves reports on the portrayal of drug usage in popular media, and hear from experts on the importance of being media literate. Discover that drugs can affect higher-order thinking by damaging the frontal lobes in the brain. Learn how to analyze mixed messages in the media about drug usage in popular culture.

Bilai Ansari's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Bilal Ansari is an African American father of three and a student in the Islamic Chaplaincy Program at Hartford Seminary. He works tirelessly in the Connecticut prison system, where inmates often convert to Islam, but where he is also the victim of a hate crime perpetrated by some of his co-workers.

Rob Pene's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Rob Pene was born in American Samoa and came to the United States on a baseball scholarship. Unsuccessful in his major-league tryouts, he pursues his passion through an urban ministry. He also writes and performs Christian rap. The sudden death of his father challenges Pene’s commitment to his chosen path.

Oyster Roast in Charleston | Original Fare

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Take a trip to the low country in South Carolina mud to find the best oysters they have to offer. Learn about the unique culture surrounding the fishing industry of the American South, and how an understanding of the local oyster biology has influenced the dining culture of the community.

The French Family | The Homefront

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Learn about the challenges of the military lifestyle for kids in this clip from The Homefront. Army Colonel Jeffrey French, his wife Kathy, and their three children Kyle (20), Sarah (19) and Annemarie (13) are currently stationed at the Army War College in Carlisle, PA—their eleventh duty station. For the kids, these moves have meant leaving friends and changing schools frequently—as many as nine, in Kyle's case. While deployed to Afghanistan in 2009-2010, Jeff's unit suffered many casualties, and several of its soldiers were found guilty of war crimes. Despite this challenging period, the Frenches remain committed to the Army—particularly their son, Kyle, who is following in his father's footsteps and is now a third year cadet at West Point.

U.S. Soldiers Returning from Afghanistan and the Challenges of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) | Iowa Soldiers Remember Afghanistan

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Many U.S. soldiers returning home after deployment in Afghanistan confront a new set of struggles. Many are challenged by the emotional distress of war and some develop Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

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