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What Are Viruses? | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 3

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Explore how viruses grow and spread, starting first with a host organism. The more species a single virus can occupy, the more likely it is to last into the future. The strain of Ebola that terrorized West Africa does an especially effective job of infecting the human body.

Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? | Above the Noise

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Above the Noise host Shirin Ghaffary weighs the potential health risks of drinking energy drinks, and compares them to other sugary, caffeinated beverages. Energy drinks are a billion dollar industry and their popularity keeps growing despite health concerns. We are warned they are particularly dangerous for children and teens -- and there have even been reports of deaths linked to energy drink consumption. In this video we take a closer look at the science to see if energy drinks are really as bad as the hype, and what it is about them that has doctors concerned.

Julie Livingston, Public Health Historian and Anthropologist | MacArthur Fellows Program

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In this interview, 2013 MacArthur Fellow Julie Livingston explains the role of a medical historian and talks about her work examining the care and treatment of individuals suffering from chronic illnesses and debilitating ailments in Botswana. Drawing on her training in anthropology and public health, Livingston expands the historical narrative by including the emotional and social impact of illness and care on populations facing the challenges of twenty-first-century political and economic development. This resource is part of the MacArthur Fellows Program Collection.

Zika Transmission | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 6

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Zika, unlike Ebola, is less commonly spread by human-to-human contact. Instead, mosquitos are the root cause. Brazil has recently implemented mosquito controls to prevent the transmission several of viral diseases, including Zika. As the world's population grows and spreads geographically, human interaction with new wildlife opens up greater opportunity for zoonotic disease to spread.

A New Foe Emerges - Nipah | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 7

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In 1988 Southeast Asia faced it's own battle with Nipah, a fruit bat-borne disease that kills more than three quarters of those infected. Nipah is only contracted in Bangladesh between the months of December and March, and this was a puzzle at first. It turns out that it is during these months that date palm sap, a national delicacy, is collected. Fruit bats, too, drink this sap, and the sap is thus the vehicle of Nipah transmission. Jonathan Epstein monitors bats in Bangladesh in an effort to prevent Nipah from becoming a global pandemic.

Wafaa El-Sadr, Infectious Disease Specialist | MacArthur Fellows Program

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In this interview, 2008 MacArthur Fellow Wafaa El-Sadr explains how factors such as access to health care, education, social status, and economic stressors inform treatment strategies. El-Sadr is an infectious disease specialist who is working to develop effective treatment programs in impoverished and immigrant communities in Harlem, as well as in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Through her innovative work, El-Sadr is setting higher standards for health care delivery for patients facing severe economic hardship. This resource is part of the MacArthur Fellows Program Collection.

Chris Rock Discusses Integration in Baseball | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

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Comedian Chris Rock and others discuss affirmative action, home runs, and integration in baseball.

How Ebola Kills | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 4

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Meet Alhassan Kemokai, an Ebola virus survivor from Sierra Leone, as he tells the story of his battle with the brutal disease. Kemokai caught Ebola while caring for his mother when she contracted the virus. For this reason, some call Ebola a disease of love: it transmits while people care for their ailing loved ones. 

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

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Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Geospatial Revolution: Food Deserts

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Food deserts is a term used to describe a region where the population has poor access to healthy, fresh, nutritious food. They exist in both rural and urban areas and are turning into a public health concern. GIS technology is supporting the solution to this problem by vividly identifying the problem area and influencing policy-making. This video segment from Penn State Public Broadcasting’s Geospatial Revolution describes one Philadelphia community’s successful efforts at doing the same.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

Gullah Love and a Fish Fry in Myrtle Beach | Original Fare

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Learn about the Gullah Geechee food culture and the perfect low-country fish fry. Much of the southern cooking in this video was inspired by the cultural history of slaves in the American south. Those recipes have evolved into a contemporary style of cooking. Join host Kelly Cox on an early-morning fishing trip and see how to prepare the bounty: crab-stuffed flounder.

Generation Like: You Are What You "Like"

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Learn about the evolution of digital media from an industry that sought out teens to one in which teens seek out content to “like” in this video from FRONTLINE: Generation Like. As school-aged children spend more time in digital spaces, companies are able to use information that they gather from their activities. This is different from how it once was. In 2001, corporations chased kids down and tried to sell cool teen culture back to them. Today, teens tell the world what they think is cool using the social currency of their generation: likes, follows, friends, and retweets. When kids like something online, it becomes part of the identity that they broadcast to the world. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

The Faris Family | The Homefront

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Learn about the effects of war on military families in this clip from The Homefront. Over a 30-year career, Command Sergeant Major Chris Faris, the former senior enlisted leader of the United States Special Operations Command, has deployed repeatedly to combat zones, beginning with the Battle of Mogadishu in 1993, and continuing through Afghanistan and Iraq. During the period between 2002 and 2011, the longest period of time that Chris was home in any single year was 89 days. The frequency and difficulty of these deployments caused enormous stress in Chris's relationship with his wife Lisa and his daughters, a struggle that the couple openly discuss. Ultimately, by deciding to seek counseling, the Farises improved their family life—and by telling their story publicly, they hope to improve the lives of other military families as well.

FRONTLINE: Prison State | Kentucky’s Prison Overhaul

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Explore how our reliance on prison to solve social problems is creating a national crisis, and how the state of Kentucky is trying to respond, in this video adapted from FRONTLINE: Prison State. Kentucky spends more than $15 million each year incarcerating people from one Louisville housing project, Beecher Terrace. One juvenile justice commissioner suggests that we are incarcerating young people merely for their poor performance in school, problems in the home, or their unwanted behavior. A law professor states that we have invested in incarceration instead of in systems designed to help people stay out of jail and prison. In just over a decade, Kentucky’s prison growth rate jumped by 45 percent and spending by almost 220 percent—to nearly half a billion dollars. This prompted reform that includes the early release of nonviolent offenders in order to save money. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE collection.

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