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Evidence Response Team | FBI: Inside the Crime Lab

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Dorian meets with a FBI special agent at the crime scene to learn about the Evidence Response Team and their process of collecting evidence.

Scientist Profile: Jock Doc

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Dr. Joel Boyd is an orthopedic surgeon and head team physician for the WNBA's Minnesota Lynx and the NHL's Minnesota Wild. Dr. Boyd uses both medical science and engineering techniques to help athletes perform their best.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

SciGirls | Turtle Mania 04: Share

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Gathering data is but a portion of an inquiry investigation; the ultimate challenge is what to do with all that information. In this video clip from SciGirls: Turtle Mania, the girls gather up all the data from their turtle population study and basking platform test. They then interpret their observations, reach their conclusions and set about constructing a coherent and hopefully persuasive presentation. To truly get the most out of their investigation, it’s vital to remain open to new ideas even while sharing their final results.

Geoambiente: Acuicultura seg. 3

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En este segmento,  GeoAmbiente se traslada a Cabo Rojo para conocer de cerca un proyecto de maricultura para el cultivo en cautiverio de colirubias y arrayaos que persigue crear nuevas oportunidades de empleo. El Dr. Edgardo Ojeda, extensionista marino del Programa Sea Grant de la Universidad de Puerto Rico e investigador principal del proyecto de maricultura para colirubias y arrayao explica el desarrollo del proyecto, usando sistemas de re-circulación en acuicultura comercial, y las oportunidades que ofrece el mismo a la economía local.

In this segment, GeoAmbiente (Geoenvironment) goes to Cabo Rojo to learn about an aquaculture project that farms fish such snappers (colirubias) and red snappers (arrayaos) in captivity.  This project aims to create new job opportunities. Dr. Edgardo Ojeda, marine extension agent of the Sea Grant Programme of the University of Puerto Rico and principal investigator of the aquaculture project for snappers (colirubias) and arrayaos explains the project development which uses commercial aquaculture recirculation systems and the opportunities that such systems offer to the local economy.

 

What Can We Do to Prevent Marine Debris? | Ocean Today

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Unless people change the way they consume and dispose of products, the marine debris problem will continue to get worse. Plastic is one of the main types of ocean trash and hurts the environment, the economy, and health. For example, plastic bags can sink to the seafloor and suffocate coral reefs, a littered beach can mean lost tourism dollars, and people can get sick by eating fish contaminated with plastic particles. By working together, people can design solutions that prevent trash from entering the ocean in the first place. Cities, businesses, communities, homes, schools all over the world and you can all contribute to the ultimate solution: prevention.

Could Eating Insects Solve World Hunger?

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Learn about a source of protein made from insects in this video from SciTech Now. The need for efficient, environmentally-friendly ways to feed a growing population has led some people to research entomophagy, which refers to eating insects. Students at Cornell University have developed a food product made of mealworm protein known as C-fu. They see C-fu as one solution to the problem of global hunger and malnutrition.

The support materials include a graphic organizer, discussion questions, and an infographic activity.

Biomorphic Robots

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In this video from SciTech Now, see how the University of South Florida’s Biomorphic Robotics Lab is turning to the animal kingdom for inspiration in developing biomorphic mimics. One day soon, these robotic creations may be able to provide unique solutions for dealing with challenging situations such as search-and-rescue and hazardous waste.

Why We Fart | MIT's Science Out Loud

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Behind every fart (and poop) is an army of gut bacteria undergoing some crazy (and crazy useful) biochemistry. Learn what they have in common with beer brewing, and why we'd want to know about this science anyway...

Scientists Develop Technology to Study Antarctic Waters

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See how scientists from Rutgers University engineered two technologies for measuring environmental conditions in Antarctica in order to better track penguin foraging in this video from SciTech Now.

The associated activity, "Engineering to Collect Environmental Data in Challenging Environments," helps students to identify various components important in the engineering of these two technologies.

Maggie Werner-Washburne, Biologist

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Dr. Maggie Werner-Washburne is a Regents Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico. She
answers the question "Why did you become a scientist?"

 

Dr. Michaelann Tartis, Chemical Engineer

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Dr. Michaelann Tartis is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Chemical Engineering at New Mexico Tech. She
answers the question "Why did you become a scientist?"

Scientist Profile: Forest Canopy Researcher

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When Forest Canopy Researcher Nalini Nadkarni was young, she studied dance and biology. Now she puts on climbing gear and spends her time high up in the forest canopy of Washington State. The canopy is one of the last frontiers on Earth, and Nalini is studying how some plants in the canopy--called epiphytes--survive without having their roots in the ground. (Spanish version also available)

Migration Tracking

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This DragonflyTV segment follows a group of students from the Montana Outdoor Science School as they track animals both traditionally and through the use of infared cameras. They remove fencing and debris to create safer paths for migrating animals, and discuss how tracking the movement of large animals can help scientists and engineers to better understand and protect migration routes.

Worm Farm

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Kevin's been fascinated with garbage since he was really little. He wanted to put an end to landfills and make it easier for people to recycle. How? Worms decompose organic waste! How can worms help us with our garbage?

ROVs

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This DragonflyTV segment demonstrates how deep-sea remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) can help us assess the health of coral reef ecosystems. It also illustrates how ROVs help us to investigate areas it would be otherwise impossible to see.

 

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