Economics

Middle (X) - Economics (X)

Hot Jobs: Cyber Security Analysts Fight Crime/Science Matters

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Learn about the exciting opportunities for and vital roles played by Cyber Security Analysts in the growing field of Cyber Security. Watch this Science Matters video to learn what it means to be a Cyber Security Analyst and see if this job could be the right fit for you.

For more information about Hot Jobs from Science Matters, click here.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Caleb Frye

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Caleb Frye of the Williams County Sheriff’s Department speaks about how his job has changed with the population growth in the oil patch.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Howard Klug (Major Problems)

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Hear Williston, North Dakota city commissioner Howard Klug who explains that the city has two major problems: employees and infrastructure. There simply aren’t enough people to fill open service industry positions and positions with the city government. The documentary film "Faces of the Oil Patch" describes the new visage of the oil patch, the areas in and around Williston, Watford City, Tioga, Stanley, New Town, Parshall, and Fort Berthold;in the words of the people who live and work in these communities. The narratives and video are woven together with visual images captured by noted still photographer Wayne Gudmundson to show everyday life and the changing vernacular landscape of northwestern North Dakota.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kasha Mason

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Learn about the typical housing arrangements for oil patch workers, as Kasha Mason of Mississippi explains why she prefers the term “lodge” to “man-camp” for the housing facility she runs, because of the controversy that has surfaced surrounding the multi-unit housing facilities.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Nathan Jermison (Growing Pains)

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Tioga mayor Nathan Jermison knows that the people and towns of northwestern North Dakota are hesitant to “stick their necks out for infrastructure needs” because they’ve been burned in the bust of the 80s.

Layover in Atlanta: The Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport | Georgia Stories

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 Flying came into vogue at the turn of the century. Asa Candler built a speedway on 300 acres of cotton fields near the village of Hapeville where popular auto races and flying shows were staged. Cities need good transportation features to prosper and Atlanta was already a railroad hub in the South. Local pilots urged that an airport be built but aviation was thought to be a fad. It was not until 1927 when the city of Atlanta bought the speedway and the federal government made Atlanta an airmail stop that the airport really took off. Through the years new terminals were built and billions were pumped in the economy.

New Cargo | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how, beginning in the late 1880s and early 1900s, the cargo transported on the steamboats changed from buffalo robes and furs to hard spring wheat, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. As a result, grain elevators were built along the banks of the river, and farmers were able to get their crops to market fairly quickly.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

E-Business | The Dos and Don'ts of E-Business

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Hear about the “do’s and don’ts” of doing business on the internet, from a representative of Microsoft Great Plains. The rise of the Internet has provided a new market for North Dakota businesses. With shopping at a store now being as easy as typing in a web address, distance from consumers is becoming less of an issue in the business world.

People and Businesses | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how communities began to develop on the banks of the Red River along the steamboats’ route in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. With new, cheaper means of transportation come people—first workers, then settlers, then merchants. 

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Eric Spaulding

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“It's about trying to make as much money as you can while you’re up here,” said trucker Eric Spaulding of Indiana. He also explains how many hours a trucker can work in a day and discusses the consequences that lack of experience can cause.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Gary Koschmeder

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Learn about Gary Koschmeder, originally from Iowa, he is the general manager of the Cenex station in Stanley, North Dakota, which is now affectionately known as “Bakken Central.”

Faces of the Oil Patch | Glenda Baker Embry (Bust)

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Students will learn about the oil industry that has created a wealth of high-paying jobs in western North Dakota, but that has caused problems for local business owners: a lack of employees.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kirk Carmody

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Learn about Kirk Carmody who works in the oil fields five days a week and sells trucks on Saturdays at the Williston Ford dealership. He notes that nearly every business in Williston has a ‘help wanted’ sign in the window, but there isn’t anybody to work non-oilfield jobs.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Nathan Jermison (Tioga)

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"This oil industry is running 250 miles per hour, and all the towns around us are running about 25,"explains Tioga, North Dakota, mayor Nathan Jermison. The people of Tioga once wanted to attract people to the small town, but the oil industry has brought too many too quickly, causing a strain on utilities and services.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Owen Miledge

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Owen Miledge of Williston, North Dakota, explains the rhythm of working on an oil rig and the professionalism that is required of the people who work on that rig. He explains how the complex-looking pieces of the rig compare to smaller tools that employees can relate to.

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