Fine Arts

Science (X) - Fine Arts (X)

Primitive Technology | Georgia Stories

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Primitive cultures living in Georgia thousands of years ago made everything they needed. Today it is important to the surviving native cultures to continue practicing the skills and sharing the traditions that ensured survival.

The Secret Life of Scientists & Engineers | Caryn Babaian

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Meet biology professor Caryn Babaian in these videos from NOVA's "The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers." Caryn uses art to help her students learn about biology and living systems.  She explains that, "The person who draws a leaf will tell you a lot more than the person who just looked at it." She is inspired by Leonardo da Vinci's notebooks. This resource is part of the NOVA: Secret Life of Scientists & Engineers Collection.

Is It Possible to Be a Scientist and an Artist?

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Meet Indre Viskontas. She has her PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience and her Masters of Music in Opera.  As a soprano opera singer, she divides her time as a professor at the University of San Francisco and the Conservatory of Music while managing a podcast and performing. 

What is Infrared Reflectography? | Detroit Institute of Arts: Virtual Field Trip

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We meet Aaron, an imaging specialist in the DIA's conservation department, who explains Infrared Reflectography and demonstrates how the technique can help us see the "underdrawings" of an artist's artwork.

Super Use

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View examples of buildings that are designed with reusable locally-obtained materials in mind.

Raleigh Studios | Fast Forward

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There are big things coming out of the little town of Senoia, Georgia—like the most popular TV show in the history of cable, for example. That’s right, it’s shot at Raleigh Studios, about an hour’s drive south of Atlanta. We go behind the scenes and talk with the experts about what it takes to create the fictional world of The Walking Dead.

Teachable Moment: Prosthetics | Fast Forward

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One of the keys for creating zombie illusions is the use of prosthetics. We find out what they are, and how they’re used in television.

Color by Nano: The Art of Kate Nichols

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Kate Nichols is an artist working in the Alivasatos Lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This video from KQED provides a description of structural color and of how it differs from chemical color.

Never Seen, Never Will | The Art Assignment

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Artist David Brooks poses the challenge to create art pieces that focus on scenes or objects that most likely won’t be seen in the duration of one’s life. He encourages artists to use their knowledge and develop a deeper connection to close and far parts of the world. Learn about the American naturalist and marine biologist, William Beebe, who inspired painters to depict the first sea creatures from the depths of the ocean. 

Inside Science | Create 3-D Objects With The Wave Of Your Hand

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Learn how mechanical engineers at Purdue University are developing a computer program that uses a camera to incorporate hand gestures and movements into software commands and explore the multitude of possibilities for this technology.

Career Connections | Sound Engineer

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Many sound engineers creatively use technology to produce audio for music, radio, film, and television. To prepare for this career path, studying media arts and science would be beneficial.

MN Original | Sculptor Alexa Horochowski

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Watch how multidisciplinary artist Alexa Horochowski’s work integrates unassuming materials such as Arctic sea kelp to create grand installations that speak to globalization and environmental decline.

Horochowski’s 2014 show, Club Disminución (or “Club of Diminishing Returns”), featured sculpture, installation, photography and video, and was created specifically for the Soap Factory. The work was inspired and informed by an artist residency in Chile.

For more MN Original resources, click here.

What Are the Most Important Science Images Ever? | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Science isn't always a visual medium, but I think it's most important moments have often been captured in photos and illustrations. I picked out some of my favorite science images from history.

Native Student Filmmakers Focus on Climate Change

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This video segment features Native student filmmakers as well as Elders talking about climate change. It begins with the student filmmakers explaining the meaning behind the film project, Where Words Touch the Earth, and why their involvement matters. Native Elders then share some of their observations of how climate has changed and the sense of responsibility Native people share not to stand idly by in the face of change. The video segment was adapted from a student video produced at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas.

The Art of Data Visualization | Off Book

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Off Book takes a look at how the practice of data visualization has gained even more importance in this digital age. From scientific visualization to pop infographics, designers are increasingly tasked with incorporating data into the media experience. Data has emerged as such a critical part of modern life that it has entered into the realm of art, where data-driven visual experiences challenge viewers to find personal meaning from a sea of information, a task that is present in every aspect of our lives.

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